HistoryKWANZAA, the African-American cultural holiday conceived and developed by Dr. MaulanaRon Karenga, was first celebra...
Kwanzaa has definite principles, practices and symbols which are geared to the social andspiritual needs of African-Americ...
Why Celebrate Kwanzaa?Whenever new information is presented to an individual or a group of people, the informationmust be ...
Primary Symbols of Kwanzaa  I.    MKEKA (M-kay-cah)        The Mkeka is a straw mat on which all the other items are place...
to the family and community. For all acts, thoughts and values are invalid if they do not        in some way benefit the c...
A principle is a rule or law that governs conduct in a given situation. The Nguzo Saba are theset of principles/values by ...
Origin of the Flag of Pan-Africanism and/or Black Nationalism Red is for the Blood. Black isthe Black People. Green is for...
Kwanzaa is a family affair and seeks to reinforce the bonds between parents and children, andto teach parents and children...
RBG Street Scholars Think Tank                                                      December, 2009           o     Begin u...
The Kwanzaa Song can be repeated as often as is wished for elevation of the spirits.THE KWANZAA SONGKwanzaa is a holidayKw...
BONUS PAGE / A KWANZAA GIFT/ 10 FREE KWANZAA MIXTAPE MP3 DOWNLOADS                      RIGHT CLICK AND SAVE AS TO DOWNLOA...
The RBG Kwanzaa (Nguzo Saba) Booklet for Download-with Mp3s Included
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The RBG Kwanzaa (Nguzo Saba) Booklet for Download-with Mp3s Included

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The RBG Kwanzaa (Nguzo Saba) Booklet for Download-with Mp3s Included

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The RBG Kwanzaa (Nguzo Saba) Booklet for Download-with Mp3s Included

  1. 1. HistoryKWANZAA, the African-American cultural holiday conceived and developed by Dr. MaulanaRon Karenga, was first celebrated on December 26, 1966. Kwanzaa is traditionally celebratedfrom December 26 through January 1, with each day focused on Nguzo Saba, or the sevenprinciples. Derived from the Swahili phrase "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first fruits",Kwanzaa is rooted in the first harvest celebrations practiced in various cultures in Africa.Kwanzaa seeks to enforce a connectedness to African cultural identity, provide a focal point forthe gathering of African peoples, and to reflect upon the Nguzo Saba, or the seven principles,that have sustained Africans. Africans and African-Americans of all religious faiths andbackgrounds practice Kwanzaa.Kwanzaa was born out of the whirlwind of social and political changes of the sixties decade. Thesixties represent one of many eras during which the African and African-American struggle forfreedom and self-identity reached its historical peak, spawning multiple revolutionarymovements.By creating Kwanzaa, African-Americans sought to rectify the cultural and economic exploitationperpetrated against us during the months of October, November, and December (the Christmasseason). During this season, corporate America typically ignored the quality of life concerns ofAfrican-Americans, yet encouraged participation in the commercialism of Christmas.Additionally, African-Americans did not observe a holiday that was specific to our needs. Areview of the major holidays celebrated in the United States would reveal that not one relatedspecifically to the growth and development of African-Americans. The development of Kwanzaaassumed a reassessment, reclaiming, recommitment, remembrance, retrieval, resumption,resurrection, and rejuvenation of the "Way of Life" principles recognized by African-Americans.These principles have strengthened African-Americans during our worldwide sojourn.Today, Kwanzaa is recognized by millions throughout America and the world. It is celebratedoften in community settings provided by homes, churches, mosques, temples, communitycenters, schools, and places of work. Kwanzaa allows us to celebrate the season withoutshame or fear of embracing our history, our culture, and ourselves.IntroductionKwanzaa is a spiritual, festive and joyous celebration of the oneness and goodness of life,which claims no ties with any religion.The focus of Kwanzaa is centered around the seven principles (Nguzo Saba) with particularemphasis on the unity of our Black families. It is a time for gathering of our families, and for arededication to manifesting the principles of Kwanzaa (Nguzo Saba) as a way of life for BlackAmericans.Nguzo Saba 24|7|365 1
  2. 2. Kwanzaa has definite principles, practices and symbols which are geared to the social andspiritual needs of African-Americans. The reinforcing gestures are designed to strengthen ourcollective self-concept as a people, honor our past, critically evaluate our present and commitourselves to a fuller, more productive future.Kwanzaa is a way of life; not just a celebration. As a living social practice, it is a week of actualremembering, reassessing, recommitting, rewarding and rejoicing. For evaluation of ourselvesand our history, we relate to our past, reassess our thoughts and practices, and recommitourselves to the achievement of Black liberation and the betterment of life for all BlackAmericans.Finally, the concept of Kwanzaa, the African-American holiday, is to help Black Americans relateto the past in order to understand the present and deal with the future.This is on-line Kwanzaa Information Center is designed to provide you with vital information tohelp in your understanding of the concept of Kwanzaa.Nguzo Saba 24|7|365 2
  3. 3. Why Celebrate Kwanzaa?Whenever new information is presented to an individual or a group of people, the informationmust be accurate, clear and have a specific meaning for that particular individual or particulargroup. Therefore, the information should be presented in a specific format and should includecertain factors. These factors are:Focus Sense of DirectionThe center of an activity or the area of attention. The way and manner in which the event will take form.It is important to relate to the past in order to To practice the principles in our lives that helped ourunderstand the present and deal with the future. A ancestors to endure oppression, slavery and racism.people will never look forward to posterity who never Emphasize Unity of the Black family.looked backward to their ancestors.Purpose GoalsThe plan, intention or reason for an activity or event. The things that will be achieved.To maintain a history. History is Knowledge, Identity To develop self and facilitate a positive Black self-and Power. esteem by exposing individuals to "KWANZAA", a culturally desirable pattern of principles, to help them live their lives and to encourage the highest level of positive Black self-esteem and spiritual development. To establish a culturally oriented "WAY OF LIFE."A symbol is an item or an object that already has aname and represents something significant. It isrenamed to give significance to a new group ofpeople or person. The Evergreen tree family areevergreens from January to October of each year,around the middle of October they becomeChristmas trees, thus representing a symbol ofChristmas.The symbols of Kwanzaa serve as instructive andinspirational objects that represent and reinforcedesirable principles, concepts and practices asreflective of both traditional and modern conceptswhich evolved out of the lives and struggles ofAfrican-American people.Nguzo Saba 24|7|365 3
  4. 4. Primary Symbols of Kwanzaa I. MKEKA (M-kay-cah) The Mkeka is a straw mat on which all the other items are placed. It is a traditional item and therefore symbolizes tradition as the foundation on which all else rests. II. KINARA (Kee-nah-rah) The Kinara is a candle-holder which holds seven candles and represents the original stalk from which we all sprang. For it is traditionally said that the First-Born is like a stalk of corn which produces corn, which in turn becomes stalk, which reproduces in the same manner so that there is no ending to us. III. MSHUMAA (Mee-shoo-maah) The seven candles represent the Seven Principles (Nguzo Saba) on which the First- Born sat up our society in order that our people would get the maximum from it. They are Umoja (Unity); Kujichagulia (Self-Determination); Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility); Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics); Nia (Purpose); Kuumba (Creativity), and Imani (Faith). IV. MUHINDI (Moo-heen-dee) The ear of corn represents the offspring or product (the children) of the stalk (the father of the house). It signifies the ability or potential of the offsprings, themselves, to become stalks (parents), and thus produce their offspring -- a process which goes on indefinitely, and insures the immortality of the Nation. To illustrate this, we use as many ears of corn as we have children which again signifies the number of potential stalks (parents). Every house has at least one ear of corn; for there is always the potential even if it has not yet been realized. V. KIKOMBE CHA UMOJA (Kee-coam-bay chah-oo-moe-jah) The Unity Cup symbolizes the first principle of Kwanzaa. It is used to pour the libation for our ancestors; and each member of the immediate family or extended family drinks from it in a reinforcing gesture of honor, praise, collective work and commitment to continue the struggle began by our ancestors. VI. ZAWADI (Sah-wah-dee) The presents (gifts) represent 1) the fruits of the labor of the parents, and 2) the rewards of the seeds sown by the children. Parents must commit their children to goodness which to us is beauty. We must commit them to good acts, good thoughts, good grades, etc., for the coming year and reward them according to how well they live up to their commitments. Goodness, again, is beauty and beauty is that which promises happinessNguzo Saba 24|7|365 4
  5. 5. to the family and community. For all acts, thoughts and values are invalid if they do not in some way benefit the community.VII. KARAMU The feast symbolizes the high festive celebration that brings the community together to exchange and to give thanks to the Creator for their accomplishments during the year. It is held on the night of December 31 and includes food, drink, music, dance, conversation, laughter and ceremony.Secondary Symbols of Kwanzaa I. NGUZO SABA (En-GOO-zoh Sah-BAH) Symbolizes the seven principles of Kwanzaa which were developed by Maulana Ron Karenga. The Nguzo Saba are social principles dealing with ways for us to relate to each other and rebuild our lives in our own images. II. BENDERA YA TAIFA The flag of Black Nationalism symbolizes the struggle of Liberation. The Red represents the blood of our ancestors; Black is for the collective color of all Black people, and Green reminds us of the land, life and new ideas we must continue to strive to obtain. III. TAMBIKO Symbolizes the libation by which honor is given in a special way to our ancestors and a call to carry out the struggle and the work they began. It clearly symbolizes the recognition of and respect for the contributions of those before us, our history and the models it offers us to emulate. IV. HARAMBEE Symbolizes a call to unity and collective work and struggle. The word means Lets pull together! V. HABARI GANI Whats the news; whats happening Swahili term used when greeting others. VI. KWAHERI Swahili term used as an expression of parting with good wishes and an expectancy to meet again.Nguzo Saba 24|7|365 5
  6. 6. A principle is a rule or law that governs conduct in a given situation. The Nguzo Saba are theset of principles/values by which Black Americans must order their relations and live their lives,if they are to make decisions about their lives and begin to build a new world and a new peopleto develop it. As a product of tradition and reason of history, the Nguzo Saba responds tocurrent needs which can be the method used by Blacks to solve the problems on every levelwhich confronts us as a people. Thus, the Nguzo Saba are social and spiritual principles,dealing with ways for us to relate to each other and rebuild our lives in our own images.Nguzo Saba (social and spiritual principles) I. UMOJA (UNITY) (oo-MOE-jah) - To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race. II. KUJICHAGULIA (SELF DETERMINATION) (koo-jee-cha-goo-LEE-ah) - To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves. III. UJIMA (COLLECTIVE WORK AND RESPONSIBILITY) (oo-JEE-mah) - To build and maintain our community together and to make our brothers and sisters problems our problems and to solve them together. IV. UJAMAA (COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS) (oo-JAH-mah) - To build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and to profit together from them. V. NIA (PURPOSE) (nee-AH) - To make as our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness. VI. KUUMBA (CREATIVITY) (koo-OOM-bah) - To do always as much as we can, in the way that we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than when we inherited it.VII. IMANI (FAITH) (ee-MAH-nee) - To believe with all our hearts in our parents, our teachers, our leaders, our people and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.Nguzo Saba 24|7|365 6
  7. 7. Origin of the Flag of Pan-Africanism and/or Black Nationalism Red is for the Blood. Black isthe Black People. Green is for the Land.Red, Black and Green are the oldest national colors known to man. Theyare used as the flag of the Black Liberation Movement in America today,but actually go back to the Zinj Empires of ancient Africa, which existedthousands of years before Rome, Greece, France, England or America.The Red, or the blood, stands as the top of all things. We lost our landthrough blood; and we cannot gain it except through blood. We must redeem our lives throughthe blood. Without the shedding of blood there can be no redemption of this race. However, thebloodshed and sorrow will not last always. The Red significantly stands in our flag as a reminderof the truth of history, and that men must gain and keep their liberty, even at the risk of bloodshed. The Black is in the middle. The Black man in this hemisphere has yet to obtain land which is represented by the Green. The acquisition of land is the highest and noblest aspiration for the Black man on this continent, since without land there can be no freedom, justice, independence, or equality. The colors were resurrected by the Hon. Marcus Garvey, Father of African Nationalism,as the symbol of the struggling sons and daughters of Africa, wherever they may be. Since the1950s, when the independence struggle began to reap fruit, the Red, Black and Green havebeen plainly adopted by Libya, Kenya and Afghanistan. Other African States have included thecolors Black and Red, combined with yellow or white.The colors were established in 1920 as the banner of the Universal Negro ImprovementAssociation (UNIA), and adopted as the symbol of Africans in America at the convention of theNegro Peoples of the World. It is a symbol of the devotion of all African people to the liberationof the African Continent, and the establishment of a Nation in Africa ruled by descendents ofslaves from the Western World.In addition, with the formation of the Republic of News Africa, it has become the symbol ofdevotion for African people in America to establish an independent African nation on the NorthAmerican Continent.Thus, the colors were not chosen at any limited convention of Black persons; but, have been, incenturies past, and are now the emblem of true Black hope and pride, as embodied in alltheories of Pan-Africanism and Black Nationalism.PledgeWE PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE RED, BLACK, AND GREEN, OUR FLAG, THE SYMBOLOF OUR ETERNAL STRUGGLE, AND TO THE LAND WE MUST OBTAIN; ONE NATION OFBLACK PEOPLE, WITH ONE GOD OF US ALL, TOTALLY UNITED IN THE STRUGGLE, FORBLACK LOVE, BLACK FREEDOM, AND BLACK SELF-DETERMINATION.Nguzo Saba 24|7|365 7
  8. 8. Kwanzaa is a family affair and seeks to reinforce the bonds between parents and children, andto teach parents and children new views and values that will aid them in self-consciousness andproviding support and defense for our people. Therefore, Kwanzaa is the time when BlackAmericans get together to give thanks, and to enjoy the blessings of living and acting togetheras a family. I. The following schedule should be used in preparing your family to participate in the Kwanzaa celebration. o December 12 - Begin to schedule meetings with family members to assign tasks for the Kwanzaa Celebration. o December 19 - Gather and arrange Kwanzaa symbols and any other decorations. Arrange the symbols on a low table or on the floor. 1. Spread the Mkeka (Straw Mat). 2. Place the Kinara (Candle Holder) in the center of the Mkeka. 3. Place the Muhindi (Ears of Corn) on either side of the Mkeka. One ear of corn for each child in the family. 4. Creatively place the Zawadi (Gifts), Kikombe Cha Umoja (Unity Cup); Tambiko (Water and Soil), and a basket of Mazao fruit on the Mkeka. II. 1. Hang up a Bendera Ya Taifa (Flag of the Black Nation). It should be facing the East. 2. Place Mishumaa Saba (Seven Candles) in the Kinara. Remember the Mishumaa should be red, black and green. Use any creative match you desire. Examples - Three Red; Three Green; One Black; Two Red; Two Green; Three BlackNguzo Saba 24|7|365 8
  9. 9. RBG Street Scholars Think Tank December, 2009 o Begin using the greeting "Habari Gani" and the response "Nzuri Kwanzaa, Nguzo Saba". Note, the response changes on the first day of Kwanzaa to Umoja, on the second day to Kujichagulia, etc. o A week of fasting, from sunrise to sunset, to cleanse the body, discipline the mind and uplift the spirit is suggested. III. On the first day of Kwanzaa (December 26) the Mtume (leader or minister) calls the family together. When everyone is present, the Mtume greets them; Habari Gani, and the family responds Umoja. THus the Kwanzaa celebration has begun. The celebration is conducted in the following order, substituting each principle for the response on its respective day. o A prayer is offered by a member of the family (all standing). o Harambee (Lets Pull Together) is a call for unity and collective work and struggle of the family.  Each member raises up the right arm with open hand and while pulling down, closes the hand into a fist.  Harmabee is done in sets of seven in honor and reinforcement of the Nguzo Saba. The Kwanzaa Song can be used at this time. The Mtume briefly talks about the concept of Kwanzaa, using the theme or focus ofKwanzaa as a sense of direction. The Tambiko (Libation) is performed by an elder. The elder should pour the libationusing juice or water from the Tambiko set up in honor of our ancestors. Harambee Symbol. Greeting should be done by the family member (preferably a youth) assigned the lightingof Mshumaa (candle). Lighting Ceremony is performed by the Youth. The Youth should light the Mshumaa(candle) for the principle of the day (i.e. Umoja (Unity) on the first day of Kwanzaa). After thelighting, the principle of the day should be discussed by every member participating in theceremony. The discussion should focus on each members understanding of the principle andtheir commitment and responsibility to practice that principle for the betterment of self, familyand Black people.. Harambee. A story, song or an object that is reflective of the principle for the day (i.e. Umoja (Unity)- Black Frying Pan) and a Scripture reading related to the principle is essential in reinforcing themeaning of that principle. Share Zawadi (Gifts). In Kwanzaa gifts are played down and spiritual and socialrejuvenation is played up. Hand made gifts are strongly encouraged over commercialpurchases. Items related to the Black heritage or items that have a special meaning that willhelp the person through the next year are strongly recommended. The gifts should be reflectiveof a commitment to education and the riches of our cultural heritage and a sign of the strugglefor liberation for Black people. The gifts can be fruits shared each night by members. The giftscan be given to the children in one of two ways: 0. One gift can be given each day to reinforce the principle for that day, or 1. On December 31st. during the Karamu (Feast), all gifts can be given. Karamu (Feast) is held on the night of December 31st. and includes food, music, dance,etc. Harambee. Closing Prayer.Nguzo Saba 24|7|365 9
  10. 10. The Kwanzaa Song can be repeated as often as is wished for elevation of the spirits.THE KWANZAA SONGKwanzaa is a holidayKwanzaa, Kwanzaa, KwanzaaIs an African holidaySeven PrinciplesSeven CandlesSeven Black days for the African KWANZAA YENU IWE NA HERI (HAPPY KWANZAA)!!!RBG Street Scholar, December 2009This booklet for download was created using data from: http://www.melanet.com/kwanzaa/whatis.htmlNguzo Saba 24|7|365 10
  11. 11. BONUS PAGE / A KWANZAA GIFT/ 10 FREE KWANZAA MIXTAPE MP3 DOWNLOADS RIGHT CLICK AND SAVE AS TO DOWNLOAD MP3s 1. play BRO. CADENCE — TRACK 1 2. play BRO. CADENCE — Track 2 3. play BRO. CADENCE — Track 3 4. play BRO. CADENCE — Track 4 5. play BRO. CADENCE — Track 5 6. play BRO. CADENCE — Track 6 7. play BRO. CADENCE — Track 7 8. play BRO. CADENCE — Track 8 9. play BRO. CADENCE — Track 9 10. play BRO. CADENCE — Track 10Nguzo Saba 24|7|365 11

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