SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind               By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III                  Chapter Extract- REAW...
Page 2 of 8      SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind               By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III                      ...
Page 3 of 8              By :Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III, Foreword by Wade W. Nobles SBA: The              Reawakening of the...
Page 4 of 8To reawaken the African mind we must ensure that the goal of our educational andsocialization processes is to u...
Page 5 of 8We cannot advance because we have:No unified spiritual base that respects and compliments our different religio...
Page 6 of 8from the right or the left, liberals or conservatives, Democrats or Republicans, view the veryexistence of Afri...
Page 7 of 8African Identity Through SANKOFAThe concept of SANKOFAStudy is a requirement for our redemption. Yet, every dis...
Page 8 of 8transmission, while oral communication is another. Deep thought can and must precede both.African teachers must...
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SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING

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SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING

  1. 1. SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING Compiled and designed by RBGStreetScholar for, study, sharing and download
  2. 2. Page 2 of 8 SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING RBG Afrikan- Centered Cultural Development and Education Wikizine Dedication video to Dr. Asa G. Hilliard III "SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind is a key. It is a roadmap. It is a call to destiny…. With SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind, Dr. Hilliard…helps us to comprehend why education is so critical to African liberation and advancement. Within his opening thoughts, Asa inextricably links the mind (spirit), with culture and education. He notes that to reawaken the African mind, one must ensure that the goal of education, and the socialization process must be to understand and live up to African cultural principles, values and virtues.” --Wade W. Nobles, Ph.D. (From the Foreword)SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING
  3. 3. Page 3 of 8 By :Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III, Foreword by Wade W. Nobles SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind. Revised Edition, September 1998 Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III was the Fuller E. Callaway Professor of Urban Education at Georgia State University. Dr. Hilliard is a noted educator, psychologist, and historian... Read Dr. Hilliards Full BiographyExtraxts: REAWAKENING"To counter the MAAFA , Africans must go through a WHMY MSW, a Kemetic term whichmeans the repetition of the birth, or a reawakening. The WHMY MSW is also a healing. Butbefore any substantial healing can take place we Africans must begin at the beginning andperuse the wisdom of our ancestors. Numerous African civilizations have left the legacy of aholistic socialization process built firmly on a spiritual foundation. In these paradigmatic Africansocieties, spirituality could not be seaparated from education, science, politics, health, nature,culture or anything else present in the society. This holistic approach can be useful in healingAfrican people today.We Africans, however, have not viewed our problem holistically. After years of living underconditions of extreme oppression, we have settled for limited definitions of our problem. Aclassic example may be taken from the period of the civil rights movement. The evil and grossinjustice of slavery and segregation violated the civil rights of African people and had to beaddressed. However, the necessary task of fighting for civil rights was insufficient to allow forthe healing of our people. Our healing requires a greater conceptual frame than that provided bycivil rights.First, we must see ourselves as an African people, or we will be unable to develop this criticalframe.Second, we must understand not only the role that white supremacy has played in oursubjugation, but also the role that we ourselves have played by not practicing self-determinationin our struggle to counter the MAAFA.SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING
  4. 4. Page 4 of 8To reawaken the African mind we must ensure that the goal of our educational andsocialization processes is to understand and live up to the principle of MAAT.MAAT is a Kemetic term that represents the singular whole for the concepts oftruthjusticeorderrighteousnessbalancereciprocityand harmonyAncient African socialization processes show us that communitiies can function and beproductive when everyone, young and old, has a sense of purpose and value that contributes tothe communitys well being. The principle of MAAT provides one such approach that Africanscan follow.To arrive at MAAT, however, requires SBA, another Kemetic term which refers toteachings, wisdom and study.Our Present Condition....No matter where Africans are - on the continent or in the diaspora - our condition is the same.We are on the bottom and descending. The MAAFA continues to take its toll. We areunconscious, unorganized, unfocused, and lost from our purpose. Our strongest visibleleadership is in hot pursuit of minimal narrow goals like, integration, civil rights, jobs, voterregistration, etc. We seek minimal adjustment and temporary comfort by assimilating towhatever the political, economic and cultural order may be, even when that order is itself inchaos, or driven by values that are anti-African.... When we "dream," we often do not dreamoriginal dreams; we merely seek relief from pain. As a result, the dream does not encompass ameaningful plan or strategy which is connected to moblization......We do not know who we are, cannot explain how we got here, and have no sense of ourdestiny beyond mere survival. Most of us hope to hitch a ride on someone elses wagon with nothought whatsoever as to where that wagon may be going. We have no destination of our own.Ask our leadership, ask our women, men or children on the street what our agenda is. Ask themwhat plans Africans have and what we want to build for ourselves within the next five, ten,twenty-five, seventy-five or one-hundred years? We are so used to having others make long-term plans for us that the idea of our own five-year plan is petrifying to us. As the 20th centurycomes to a close, why do we remain in such a vulnerable and debased condition? Certainly, theconscious and confined oppression of our enemies is a factor, but several other factors havecontributed to our present condition and prevent us from reaching our full potential as a people.SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING
  5. 5. Page 5 of 8We cannot advance because we have:No unified spiritual base that respects and compliments our different religions.No global view of ourselves as one people.No geopolitical view of our conditions as a people.No collective aim.No structures for socializing the masses of our children.No structure communicating these things to our masses...... To understand our present condition in the world, we must also understand genocide . TheGeneral Assembly of the United Nations adopted the Genocide Convention in 1948 (Patterson,1970). Article II of the Convention defines "genocide" as Any of the following acts comitted withintent to destroy in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group as such:A) Killing members of the groupB) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;C) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physicaldestruction in whole or in part;D) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;E) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another (Patterson, p. xii)......By this definition, African people are clearly victims of genocide. The genocidal practices ofslavery, lynching, colonization, etc. are easy to identify, but the more recent institutionalized andcovert forms of genocide produced by legal systems, educational systems, public healthsystems, etc., are difficult to distinguish. There is no public outcry over these latter forms ofgenocide for two primary reason:(1) active propaganda disseminated through the media keeps the masses of people ignorant of,and agents in, their own genocide;and(2) lack of media access slows those who are knowledgeable about genocidal practices fromsharing that knowledge with and empowering others.Genocide, as defined above, is both physical and cultural. Both forms of genocide are visited onAfricans. Physical genocide tends to be practiced most often by the so-called ultra right. Thislargely involves well-known processes of segregation physical oppression that have historicallyled to the elimination of many Africans. Cultural genocide is practiced mainly by the left.Historically, it was referred to as "whitening," and was practiced most frequently in LatinAmerican countries where it continues to be used today (Hilliard & Martin, 1995).Cultral genocide is in some ways, the ultimate vehicle for the elimination of a people because itsgoal, unlike that of the physical form of genocide, remains hidden......Both physical and cultural genocide of Africans involve decisions by non-African elites todominate and destroy the African community (Hilliard & Martin). White policymakers, whetherSBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING
  6. 6. Page 6 of 8from the right or the left, liberals or conservatives, Democrats or Republicans, view the veryexistence of Africans as a problem.Thus only African themselves can wake up, prepare, and insure that Africans remain presentand fully able to maintian a quality standard of life"SBA to SIA: Learning"Every member of the community should participate in SBA. SBA meansteachinglearningwisdomand study or collectively, deep thought.Deep thought is universal among Africans. Respect for deep thought is reflected in Africanlanguages and especially in terminology about words (i.e. Nommo in Bantu, "So" in Dogon,Cinni in Sonjay {kwame note: Songhai/Songhoi} A study of proverbs, metaphors, and stories inAfrican societies shows that deep thought was the rule. SBA is thus, one way of naming Africandeep thought. It is both a noun and verb; it is deep thought and deep thinking. It is the word forteach and study with a slight change in determinative, for clarification of meaning.In my opinion, the language of KMT (called Egypt by the Greeks) is the most beautiful in theworld. It is alphabetic, and ideographic or symbolic at the same time. It is full of multiplemeanings, simple and complex at the same time. It embodies the deepest of ]thoughts, usingKMT and other African environments (i.e., plants, animals, people, tools, buildings, etc.), toconvey deep thought. The language of KMT was called MDW NTR (divine speech) and onetried to produce MDW NFR (beautiful speech) {Carruthers, 1996}SBA is our best effort at transliterating the glyphs in international phonetic alphabetic terms. Wedo not know the correct pronunciation. By convention, the vowelless MDW NTR is supplied withvowels that we guess approximate the original Coptic (a mixture of later versions of MDW NTRand Greek) is as close as we can come to the ancient sounds.The term SBA first appears in Kemetic texts during the pyramid age (old Kingdom). It appearsagain in the Literacy Age (11th Dynasty of the Middle Kingdom). In that text from the tomb of anIntef Per Aa (Pharoah), SBA is precisely deep thought, which Greek students of African priestswould call Sophia (b, p, or f as labials are spelled in Greek ph, so that SBA becomes SPHAAn important element of SBA is SANKOFA the Akan word that means which becomes sophia(Obenga, 1992). go back and fetch it. We must know and understand our past in order to moveforward. This does not mean that we should live blindly in the past, but it means that we mustuse the valuable wisdom that our ancestors left for us. Part of understanding what is happeningto us in the MAAFA requires that we know where we came from. We can only learn where wecame from if we practice SBASBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING
  7. 7. Page 7 of 8African Identity Through SANKOFAThe concept of SANKOFAStudy is a requirement for our redemption. Yet, every discipline that we study must locate itselffirmly within the African tradition. This defines us as a people. While we must be aware of othertraditions in order to appreciate the whole human story, we must be aware of how thosetraditions intersect with African traditions. It makes no sense for an African to begin anintellectual quest from someone elses standpoint.seems clear enough, but we cannot fully appreciate its value to Africans until we confront afundamental question: "Whether to be African or not to be?" That is the fundamental questionEverything else we do flows from this basic point. We are either African or we are nothing;whether we are on the continent or in the diaspora We cannot claim our heritage when it isexpediant for us and ignore it when it is not. This only creates confusion.African Students. All African people must be students. In many ancient African schools,students would spend almost a lifetime in formal training or apprenticeships learning all facets ofsubjects. The purpose of education was not to speed through a four year program to get a joband "get paid" but rather to become a better person and to learn how to live in harmony withnature, utilizing whatever skill you have. Greater understanding was earned through SBA, thestudy of MDW NTR and NFR. MDW NTR means "the word of the divine," and MDW NFRmeans "good speech," or "the beautiful word." Jacob Carruthers (1995) has referred to thecombination of MDW NTR and MDW NFR as "African deep thought." Without African deepthought the WHMY MSW or "reawakening" would be impossible.The healing process for people of African descent can only be initiated as a consequence of ourengagement in deep thought. Our WHMY MSW requires deep thought about our culturalessence, our cosmology and metaphysics, our geopolitics, and our strategies for long-rangedevelopment, among other things. We cannot evade our responsibility to study. We have amassive task before us. This time we must get it right.African Teachers What do African teachers owe African people? It is part of the reality of thetimes that our children will be taught, not only by Africans, but by others in formal and informalinstitutions (i.e., the schools, the media, etc.). Based on the past, we can expect leittle morethan "schooling" from the larger societies of which we are a part - not education for ourtransformation.African teachers should, first and foremost, be on a quest to practice SBA.MDW NTR texts, theGeez and other Ethiopian texts, and the Meroitic script of Nubia/Sudan. We also have WestAfrican texts, as shown by Obenga (1995) and Niagoran-Bouah (1984; 1985). African teacherscannot ignore our awesome oral tradition, which has been given too little respect (Chinweizu,1987). We will miss powerful sources of information and understanding if we accept the alienview that deep thought may be captured only in written form. The written text is one form ofSBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING
  8. 8. Page 8 of 8transmission, while oral communication is another. Deep thought can and must precede both.African teachers must study African education and socialization practices from the continent anddiaspora. But, while doing this, we must remember that schooling, education and "socialization"are inadequate if we do not study African deep thought. Within African deep thought, theconcepts of schooling, education and socialization were integrated into the larger process ofhuman transformation - the process of becoming more like the divine. The process oftransformation incorporated different conepts and approaches depending on the time and place.For example, traditional child-rearing practieces (Gerber, 1958, Pearce, 1977; Ainsworth, 1967)provide foundations and strategies that can be used on children today. As I suggest in Chapter5, African traditional schools, sometimes referred to as "Bush Schools," also provide ideas forcurricular development (Harley, 1960s; Warfield-Coppock, 1990). There is something dreadfullywrong with an education/socialization process that leaves us ignorant of our past, strangers toour people, apes of our oppressors, and creatures of habitual, shallow thought, and trivialvalues. Therefore, there must be an independent African effort to guarantee that our childrenand our communities develop the perspectives, purposes, skills and the knowledge to functionin ways that enhance our survival and development. African teachers must understand Africanhistory, practices, spirituality and theories in education and socialization...By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III, Foreword by Wade W. Nobles SBA: The Reawakening of theAfrican Mind. Revised Edition, September 1998 Also see: Free Your Mind (Return to the Source- African Origins, Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, IIISBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind By: Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III Chapter Extract- REAWAKENING

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