INTRODUCTION to the RBG Honorable Dr. Amos N. Wilson Studies Collection
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

INTRODUCTION to the RBG Honorable Dr. Amos N. Wilson Studies Collection

on

  • 482 views

Access the RBG Communiversity Dr. Amos N. Wilson Video Player here

Access the RBG Communiversity Dr. Amos N. Wilson Video Player here

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0E8B95FA3F4871B2

Statistics

Views

Total Views
482
Views on SlideShare
480
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

https://twitter.com 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    INTRODUCTION to the RBG Honorable Dr. Amos N. Wilson Studies Collection INTRODUCTION to the RBG Honorable Dr. Amos N. Wilson Studies Collection Document Transcript

    • INTRODUCTION to the RBG Honorable Dr. Amos N. Wilson Studies Collection INTRODUCTION to the RBG Honorable Dr. Amos N. Wilson Studies Collection “…He found the historical romanticism (black firsts / "Egyptian Obsession") and contributionism (gifts to oppressive systems/"Black History Month") in excess, reactionary and an affront to the realization of Afrikan growth, development and advancement (Pan-Afrikanism)…” Click for full size poster/ statement keepsake Open Video Player
    • INTRODUCTION to the RBG Honorable Dr. Amos N. Wilson Studies Collection OPEN the Studies Collection Amos Wilson (1941 - 1995) Dr. Amos Nelson Wilson (1941 - 1995) Former Social Caseworker, Psychological Counselor, Supervising Probation Officer, Training Administrator in the New York City Department of Juvenile Justice, Assistant Professor of Psychology at the City University of New York, Master Teacher, Organizer, and Author. The late, Honorable Dr. Wilson was born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi in 1941. Familiarly referred to as Brother Amos, he provided the average person with an acute analysis of where we are and the things that affect us. He served as a council to energize our race and those in positions of influence as to how to carry out their leadership responsibilities. Dr. Wilson's activities transcended academia into the fields of business, owning and operating various enterprises in the greater New York area. Wilson transitioned in 1995 and could've been found lecturing with the elders mentioned...he admired Dr. Chancellor Williams. However, because of his understanding of consciousness (trained as a developmental psychologist/clinical psychologist and MUCH MORE!), his comprehension per personality/identity/culture/socialization/pedagogy, etc., (esp., Psycho-history: how historical experiences--natural and social--shape the individual and the group), gave him another insight that many (really most) are now "catching-up" with today. He predicted and prescribed endless well-though out works as to the black American's and to a lesser degree, the global black "collective's," dire reality. He found the historical romanticism (black firsts/"Egyptian Obsession") and contributionism (gifts to oppressive systems/"Black History Month") in excess, reactionary and an affront to the realization of Afrikan growth, development and advancement (Pan-Afrikanism). These are his body of work: Developmental Psychology of the Black Child Awakening the Natural Genius of Black Children Black-On-Black Violence: The Psychodynamics of Black Self- Annihilation in Service of White Domination Understanding Black Adolescent Male Violence: Its Remediation and Prevention The Falsification of Afrikan Consciousness: Euro-centric History, Psychiatry and the Politics of White Supremacy Afrikan-Centered Consciousness Vs. The New World Order Blueprint for Black Power: A Moral, Political, and Economic Imperative for the Twenty-First Century (his last text before transition)