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Intellectual Warfare-Professor Jacob H. Carruthers -Jedi Shemsu Jehewty
Intellectual Warfare-Professor Jacob H. Carruthers -Jedi Shemsu Jehewty
Intellectual Warfare-Professor Jacob H. Carruthers -Jedi Shemsu Jehewty
Intellectual Warfare-Professor Jacob H. Carruthers -Jedi Shemsu Jehewty
Intellectual Warfare-Professor Jacob H. Carruthers -Jedi Shemsu Jehewty
Intellectual Warfare-Professor Jacob H. Carruthers -Jedi Shemsu Jehewty
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Intellectual Warfare-Professor Jacob H. Carruthers -Jedi Shemsu Jehewty

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Intellectual Warfare-Professor Jacob H. Carruthers -Jedi Shemsu Jehewty

Intellectual Warfare-Professor Jacob H. Carruthers -Jedi Shemsu Jehewty

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  • 1. RBG Blakademics July, 2010 Intellectual Warfare Professor Jacob H. Carruthers -Jedi Shemsu JehewtyBy: Jacob Carruthers, A scholarly work several years in the making, Intellectual Warfare testifies that the foundation of modern Western thought, theory, and practice can be traced back to ancient African thought, theory, and practice. Dr. Carruthers exposes the African influence on Greek and Roman thought and its influence on the development of modern Western society, then establishes the urgency to defend and honor the role of Ancient African civilizations on this major event In the pages of Intellectual Warfare , Dr. Carruthers exposes fallacies and reestablishes new and undistorted ways of viewing the formation of Western society and how classic 1
  • 2. RBG Blakademics July, 2010literature shaped the contemporary world in intricate and sometimes startlingly andbrutally honest and uncompromising detail. He is not satisfied with simply challengingthe reader to think about things differently, but goes further citing specific examples andoffering instruction on how to begin to retrain oneself to think about the origins ofmodern society in other terms. The esteemed scholar and defender of African centeredthought is ever vigilant and provocative in the pages of this text. He separates this latestwork from other such critical efforts by expanding the text with instruction forimplementing new ways of looking at the educational curriculum to ensure the challengeto improve education can be taken up by future generations. He offers insight into howto incorporate the reexamination of classical African literature in the education system. OPEN PLAYLIST 2
  • 3. RBG Blakademics July, 2010 African Centered Education By Dr. Jacob H. CarruthersThe African centered curriculum has emerged as the leading thrust in the movement to reformeducation in the United States. The western civilization cultural monopoly of modern educationis undergoing revision and moving toward more balanced multicultural content in the wake ofthe momentum caused by the African centered education project and its predecessor, the BlackStudies movement.The African centered education campaign is related to the chronic failure of the educationsystem to provide equal educational results and opportunities for African Americans. But even ifAfrican American students were equally successful in terms of education achievements, theAfrican centered curriculum would still be necessary. Indeed African American students whoexcel in school are as deprived of cultural equality as are those who fail. Thus self-esteem asconventionally understood is not a central issue because many African Americans includingmost high achievers have positive self-concepts. What many African Americans including highachievers suffer from is the pervading negative image of African peoples of whom they aredescendants. One would expect that improving the image of ones social or ethnic group wouldhave a positive effect on ones self image.Indeed all students suffer from these negative images of Africa and its people. Such deprivationis criminal in view of the fact that the negative images are the product of intellectual fabricationsthat were designed to justify racial exploitation and injustice especially slavery, colonialism,segregation and the denial of economic, social and political equality to persons of Africandescent. The problem of teaching about Africa is thus deeply embedded in the curriculumphilosophy which is the turn based upon modern European philosophy.The lowest point of modern western philosophy was the inclusion of arguments for whitesupremacy and "Negro" inferiority in philosophical writings during the 18th and 19th centuries.The prestige of some of the thinkers compounds the evil. David Hume (On National Character),Charles Montesquieu (The Spirit of the Laws), and George Hegel (The Philosophy of History) 3
  • 4. RBG Blakademics July, 2010were the forerunners for writers like Thomas Carlyle (The Nigger Question) and JosephGobineau (The Inequality of the Human Races) who were in turn forerunners of Adolph Hitler.The modern fabricators of the doctrine of white supremacy firmly attached the insidiousargument to the concept of western civilization. The result was the creation of the idea that thewhite race had performed a cultural miracle and broken with the superstitious cultures of remoteantiquity. According to this, the ancient Greek pioneers had provided a mighty foundation for thedevelopment of the highest culture known to humankind. Thus civilization in is true form startedamong Europeans while the other continental cultures were still retarded in barbarism ofsavagery. The evolutionary cultural hierarchy that emerged placed African culture firmly on thebottom and European or western civilization at the top. Thus while all cultures other than thewestern European one were degraded, Africa occupied a unique position. Africans wereremoved from history through this worldview. Africa as Hegel put it "is no historical part of theworld" (Hegel, p.99). Indeed the differences between the civilizations originating on the Eurasiancontinent and Africa are mostly depicted as qualitative and not merely attributed to a stage ofdevelopment.In view of the western philosophical project of historical and cultural genocide against Africanpeoples, the African centered curriculum is essential. The first and most important reason is torestore the truth to the curriculum. The falsification of the role of Africa in world history andcivilization results not only in a deformation of African history but the history of the world,especially since Africa has played such a decisive part in the events that comprise world history.The correction of this mutilation is surely in the interest of humanity, if the truth is at all relevantto human development.A second reason is the necessity of developing a framework for cultural equality as we moveinto the 21st century. The next century which marks the beginning of a new millennium willdoubtless witness the transition of world power from one center of gravity (the western one ) toanother (the eastern one). Such a transition is perhaps destined to be even more dramatic thanthat of the 16th century which witnessed the reverse. The children now in school will live theirlives in the 21st century which will be characterized by multicultural challenges not faced inprevious centuries. Even today the multicultural world is exploding as long suppressed culturesare now demanding dignity and power in the world arena. The road to multicultural equality andrespect cannot even begin until Africa is restored to its proper historical and cultural position.A third reason for the necessity of the African centered curriculum is the fact that any culture(especially one which has been suppressed) needs its own apparatus for its restoration,maintenance and development. The main reason western culture has been dominant isbecause Europeans have controlled political, economic and social power including educationalpolicy for the last several centuries. Even so some cultures have fared better in this regardbecause the west was not able to gain complete educational hegemony. Japan is a goodexample.A fourth reason for the African centered curriculum is the peculiar capability of the Africancentered education movement to provide the leadership in educational reform. The Africancentered education project and its predecessor, the Black Studies movement, have developedthe open ended critique of western education which is a necessary aspect of the reform ofeducation. These movements have also spawned the organizational bases to effectively worktoward the implementation of the changes. Without this critique and the organizational pressuremulticulturalism would remain an abstraction capable of being used to perpetuate the 4
  • 5. RBG Blakademics July, 2010Eurocentric and anti-African curriculum. Indeed many so called proponents of multiculturalismare demonstrating such contradictions today. Dianne Ravitch is a prime example of theproblem.A final reason for the African centered curriculum is the nature of the population composition inthe United States. This country is composed of a variety of ethnic and racial groups. As such thecountry should properly be conceived of as the United States of various ethnic, national andracial groups. The Eurocentric curriculum, more or less, serves the cultural interest of mostEuropean ethnic groups. It does not serve the cultural interest of most people of Africandescent. Since population patterns are such that most African Americans live in predominantlyAfrican American communities and attend predominantly African American schools, it is logicalthat they should be taught from an African perspective if they so choose.The African Foundations programs of the Kemetic Institute are designed to provide assistanceto communities, schools, and teachers who opt to move in the direction of African centerededucation. Our programs will also assist those who are attempting to teach correctly aboutAfrica. When the African foundation is firmly in place, the teaching about the African Americanexperience will be successful.(Winter 1995)Works by Dr. Jacob Hudson CarruthersCompiled by Runoko RashidiCarruthers, Jacob H. Science and Oppression. Chicago: Kemetic Institute, 1972.Carruthers, Jacob H. "Futurity and the Black Race in the Western Hemisphere." BlackBooks Bulletin 4, No. 2 (Summer 1976): 40-43.Carruthers, Jacob H. Review of Cultural Unity of Black Africa, by Cheikh Anta Diop. InBlack Books Bulletin 5, No. 4 (1977): 46-48.Carruthers, Jacob H. "Writing for Eternity." Black Books Bulletin 5, No. 2 (1977): 32-34.Carruthers, Jacob H. "Cheikh Anta Diop: The Man Who Refuses to be Forgotten, Part I."The Black American, 14-20 Jun 1979: 30-31.Carruthers, Jacob H. "Cheikh Anta Diop: The Man Who Refuses to be Forgotten, Part II."The Black American, 21-27 Jun 1979: 30-34.Carruthers, Jacob H. "African Political Thought: A Question of the Foundation, Part I." TheBlack American 18, No. 25 (1979): 30-31.Carruthers, Jacob H. "African Political Thought: A Question of the Foundation, Part II." TheBlack American 18, No. 26 (1979). 5
  • 6. RBG Blakademics July, 2010Carruthers, Jacob H. "Reflections on the History of the Afrocentric Worldview." BlackBooks Bulletin 7, No. 1 (1980): 4-7.Carruthers, Jacob H. "Maat: The African Universe." Journal of Black Studies 1, No. 1(Summer-Fall 1982): 27-33.Carruthers, Jacob H. "Orientation and Problems in the Redemption of Ancient Egypt."Journal of Black Studies 1, No. 2 (1983).Carruthers, Jacob H. Essays in Ancient Egyptian Studies. Foreword by Maulana Karenga.Los Angeles: University of Sankore Press, 1984.Carruthers, Jacob H. The Irritated Genie: An Essay on the Haitian Revolution. Chicago:Kemetic Institute, 1985.Carruthers, Jacob H. "The United Two Lands." Journal of Black Studies (Fall 1985): 40-50.Carruthers, Jacob H. "A Legend in His Own Time, Diop Put Africa in Proper Perspective."The Final Call, 30 Aug 1986: 26.Carruthers, Jacob H. "The Wisdom of Governance in Kemet Restoration. Edited by MaulanaKarenga and Jacob H. Carruthers. Los Angeles: University of Sankore Press, 1986: 3-29.Carruthers, Jacob H. Who Were the Ancient Egyptians? Chicago: Carruthers, 1991.Carruthers, Jacob H. "Outside Academia: Bernals Critique of Black Champions of AncientEgypt." Journal of Black Studies 22, No. 4 (1992): 459-76.Carruthers, Jacob H. African or American: A Question of Intellectual Allegiance. Chicago:Kemetic Institute, 1994.Carruthers, Jacob H. "Reflections on the Founding of the Association for the Study ofClassical African Civilizations." Kemetic Institute 2, No. 4 (1994): 1.Carruthers, Jacob H. Mdr Ntr: Divine Speech (A Historiographical Reflection on AfricanDeep Thought from the Time of the Pharaohs to the Present). Foreword by John HenrikClarke. London: Karnak House, 1995.Carruthers, Jacob H. "The Elders Staff Tell Our Children: Renew the Instructions of TheirMothers and Fathers." Louisiana Weekly, 14-20 Oct 1996: Page 10, Section A.Carruthers, Jacob H., Rekhety Wimby, and Roosevelt H. Roberts. Kemetic Name Book.Chicago: Kemetic Institute, 1987.Carruthers, Jacob H., and Maulana Karenga, eds. Kemet and the African Worldview:Research, Rescue and Restoration. Los Angeles: University of Sankore Press, 1986. 6 Tutorial designed by RBG Street Scholar

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