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The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
The center for human rights and constitutional law
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The center for human rights and constitutional law

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  • 1. The Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law 256 S. Occidental Blvd. Los Angeles, California 90057
  • 2. The Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law <ul><li>We are a non-profit, public interest legal foundation dedicated to aggrandize and protect the civil, constitutional, and human rights of immigrants, refugees, children, and the poor. </li></ul><ul><li>We support the disenfranchised individuals who are often overlooked by society. We have a vast spectrum of people we sponsor and support. </li></ul>
  • 3. Our Mission <ul><li>We want to focus our work on the holistic constitutional rights of immigrants, refugees, and children, class action litigation of issues with broad impact on indigent minority and ethnic communities, technical support and training for advocates and immigrant communities, and international human rights cases and campaigns. </li></ul>
  • 4. Inputs <ul><li>It is imperative for us to receive funding because of the money we use to support those who cannot defend themselves because of their own lack of money, and to keep our staff updated on all salient law issues </li></ul><ul><li>We also need inspired and motivated volunteers to help curtail the violation of human rights in our legal system. </li></ul>
  • 5. Outputs <ul><li>We helped more than 130 individuals in the past year pay for their attorneys in court. </li></ul><ul><li>We have a homeschool for homeless youth which consists of a variety of different classes including music, art, and dance. </li></ul><ul><li>We help and find different opportunities for minorities to find jobs that can sustain their family </li></ul><ul><li>We address both policy issues relating to the treatment of unaccompanied migrant children, as well as mechanisms for the delivery of direct non-governmental community-based services to such children. </li></ul>
  • 6. Outcomes <ul><li>We believe that with the use of our organization, people will be able to exercise their rights and have a fair chance in court. </li></ul><ul><li>We want to give individuals an opportunity to be represented by an esteemed attorney, even if it is to our own cost. </li></ul><ul><li>We want to give the youth an opportunity to have an education and grow up in a safe environment. </li></ul>
  • 7. Process <ul><li>The Center for Human Rights & Constitutional Law is effective because it is committed to delivering relevant and useful support services to legal services field offices, community-based organizations, and pro bono private counsel serving low-income residents of California. We examine different ideas on how we can better improve our system, and thus protect the rights of human beings more efficiently and effectively. We have researchers constantly analyzing and accurately interpreting evidence in order to prepare ourselves for the future. </li></ul>
  • 8. Community Need <ul><li>We have remained dedicated to defending and advancing the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. </li></ul><ul><li>We accept cases and projects based on principle and the value of the struggle itself, not solely by using a calculus of victory. </li></ul><ul><li>Some people in our society just cannot pay for the national average billing rate, a staggering $284 an hour, according to www.research.lawyers.com </li></ul>
  • 9. Shuttleworth Foundation Shuttleworth Foundation The Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law Inspired by: 1.) The idea that it is people who change the world for the better 2.) That if we are rigorously open about ideas and practices, more people will copy them and make the world a better place in a shorter period of time. 1.) We truly understand that it is people who change the world. Not only do we use people in our workforce to instill change, we change the lives of others knowing that they, too, have the potential to change the world. 2.) To an outsider, it may seem like our approach is ridiculous and far-fetched, however, we believe that being more open and putting our “chips all-in”, we believe we will be more effective. Which is why we defend “pro bono” as well as support many children with no charge to them. We often absorb the cost of the top tier attorneys who are not willing to defend “pro bono”, which is practically unheard of in our society.
  • 10. Shuttleworth Foundation cont. Shuttleworth Foundation The Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law 1.) Provides funding for dynamic leaders who are at the forefront of social change 2.) Looking for an institution in need for some support through an innovative social investment model. 1.) We believe that we are the social innovators that the Shuttleworth Foundation is looking for. We have a unique approach to an often overlooked problem in our society. We are the “dynamic leaders” in our society that spearheads social change. 2.) We maximize growth because we are constantly looking for willing and motivated individuals who would volunteer or intern for our company. With more growth means more money, which we are in need of
  • 11. Critical Thinking <ul><li>Critical thinking is a monumental part of our organization. We need to be constantly thinking of new ways to improve our organization. Our staff is consistently thinking creatively while exploring consequences to help make our organization stronger and more effective. The people that comprise our organization are articulate and critical thinkers and communicators. We have published the essays articles that shed light and perspective on the issues taken up by the Center. </li></ul>
  • 12. Critical Thinking cont. <ul><li>Our interns and staff will always encounter opportunities and seek improvements in our company. Our interns will have the chance to attend real court cases as well as have the opportunity to pursue law themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>Our attorneys will have to think critically in order to prevent underprivileged individuals for going to jail innocently. We believe that we need to make salient arguments in order to grow in knowledge. </li></ul>
  • 13. Critical Action <ul><li>At The Center, we believe that we can maximize growth by informed action and help our society in need. In order to take informed action, we need to research and practice different and efficient ways to help and protect the civil, constitutional, and human rights of immigrants, refugees, children, and the poor. </li></ul>
  • 14. Critical Reading <ul><li>At the Center, we need to be constantly in critical reading in order to keep updated about all the changes in the law, as well as different ways to protect people from unjust or corrupt laws. We need to organize ideas and be critical of all the changes of the laws. </li></ul><ul><li>We need to be able to paraphrase what we read in order to explain it better to citizens who do not know the law jargon. </li></ul>
  • 15. Critical Reading cont. <ul><li>The writers in our center periodically write in-depth reports on critical issues that affect our litigation. We have authored reports on jail expansion in upstate and suburban California, torture at Guantánamo, extraordinary rendition, and resettlement issues and concerns of ex-detainees, among others. We believe that these reports will instill Critical Reading to those in our society so they will be more aware of what is going on in their own society. </li></ul>
  • 16. My Personal Involvement <ul><li>Growing up as one of a few Koreans in a mainly Hispanic community in La Palma, CA, discrimination became normal to me. All Koreans were assumed to be affiliated with “KK”, a Korean gang originated in the La Palma/Buena Park area. The first human reaction to gangs would be discontent, or even hatred. However, growing up and having a family-like connection, or “brotherhood”, I believe we were completely misunderstood. With genuinely decent and good people having been discriminated their whole lives, they had no choice but to band together in order to protect themselves. Throughout my seemingly long life I have made relationships with people that I cannot imagine the “normal people” making. I saw many people go to jail for more than 25 years for gang affiliation, a mere 3 year punishment according to the California Penal Code, because they had weak defense attorneys, and mainly because of their image. I believe that this organization is helping those who really need help and reaching out to people who cannot afford to have good attorneys, and being trampled on by the rich, elite class. </li></ul>
  • 17. How you can get involved <ul><li>The Center offer a variety of different ways for people who share the same mission as us to lend a hand to the cause. With the permission from some academic institutions, we give academic credit to law students who volunteer at our organization. We also offer internships and job opportunities to those who wish to make a career with our organization. We also gladly accept any amount of donation. In order to get involved, you can visit http://centerforhumanrights.org. Every penny is appreciated and will go a long way in the journey to make our government just. </li></ul><ul><li>With any questions, you can email [email_address] , or call (213) 388-8693 </li></ul>

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