Snack Foods in the U.S., 4th Edition

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Snack Foods in the U.S., 4th Edition

  1. 1. Snack Foods in the U.S., 4th EditionPublished: June 2011No. of Pages: 257Price: $ 3300U.S. retail sales of packaged snacks rose to nearly $64 billion in 2010, and Packaged Factsprojects sales to approach $77 billion by 2015, a total market increase of over 20%. Despitethe lingering effects of global recession, American consumers are snacking more than ever,thanks to less frequent restaurant dining, frenzied lifestyles that encourage on-the-goeating, and a growing tendency to replace meals with several smaller snacks. Additionally,marketers have responded to concerns about the growing impact of obesity on the health ofthe nation, and have made great strides in developing healthier snack foods that still tastegood. While value is still one of the primary drivers of snack purchases, the economy hasrecovered to an extent that consumers are once again making health, convenience, andeven indulgence top priorities as well.This fully updated Packaged Facts report U.S. Snack Market examines the market forpackaged sweet and salty snacks within the context of broader food industry trends in newproduct development and marketing. To accommodate the complexities of the U.S. marketwithin shifting socioeconomic contexts, the report investigates not only the sales data, newproduct introductions and market positioning strategies, but also the lifestyle patterns thatcontribute to the rise and fall of snacking trends. This completely revised edition provides anomnibus approach to the market, examining snacks via two broad classifications, sweet andsalty/savory, while providing greater detail for dozens of categories and segments in whichmarket activity dictates closer inspection.Browse All: Food Market Research ReportsA new feature of this study is data from Packaged Facts’ new Food Shopper Insights Survey,conducted in March 2011. Gauging the shopping patterns and attitudes of adults who haveshopped for groceries within 24 hours of being surveyed, these data paint a detailed pictureof U.S. snack trends by broader consumer health goals and nutrition concerns, ingredientconcerns such as low-sugar and gluten-free, purchase motivators such as “family favorite”and “product looked appetizing,” snack occasions and timing (e.g., “between meals,”weekday vs, weekend, at home vs away from home), brand loyalty by product type, store-brand appeal, and coupon usage. Additional data sources include multi-year ExperianSimmons Market Research Bureau data, which provides a detailed look at category-leveland brand penetration levels; InfoScan Review data, which quantifies marketer and brandshares across numerous product categories; and new product tracking data from Product
  2. 2. Launch Analytics, a Datamonitor service. In addition, category-specific marketer and brandfocus discussions help to define the relationship between consumer attitudes and productdevelopment.Table Of ContentsChapter 1: Executive SummaryIntroductionScope of ReportTwo Classifications: Sweet and Salty/SavoryReport MethodologyMarket Size and CompositionU.S. Snack Market Approaches $64 BillionSnacking as a Way of Life“Better-for-you” Snack Products in High DemandSalty/Savory Increases Share of Snacks MarketSalty/Savory Snacks Top List of Dollar GrowthFigure 1-1: Share of SymphonyIRI-Tracked Snack Sales by Classification: Sweet vs.Salty/Savory, 2006 vs. 2010 (percent)Supermarkets Account for 41% of Snack MarketCompetitive TrendsMultinational Conglomerates DominateMergers and AcquisitionsKraft/CadburyDiamond Foods/Kettle Foods/PringlesSnyder’s-LanceLink Industries and JBSPrivate-Label Sales Outpace Market GrowthHershey and Mars Are Dominant Forces in Chocolate CandyMars Leads in Non-Chocolate CandyKraft Accounts for One-Third of Cookie SegmentGeneral Mills and Clif Are Leaders in Food BarsGeneral Mills Corners Over Half of Dry Fruit Snacks MarketFruit Cups/Bowls Marketers Experience LossesFrito-Lay Is Potato Chip PowerhouseTortilla/Tostada Chip Segment Loses SteamKraft’s Ritz on Top in CrackersKraft’s Planters King of Snack Nuts Despite LossesPrivate Label Claims Half of Nutritional Snacks/Trail Mixes SalesPopcorn and Rice/Popcorn CakesDried Meat SnacksMarketing and New Product TrendsNew Snack Product Introductions RecoverSweet Categories Lead in New Product Intros“Natural” Tag Tops Claims ListHealth-Related Claims Reclaiming Lost GroundSpecial Diets Tags Steadily IncreaseKraft Leads in 2010 Product IntroductionsConsumer Trends
  3. 3. Majority of Americans Seek Healthy LifestylesFigure 1-2: Consumer Psychographics: Physical Health and Fitness, March 2011 (percent ofU.S. grocery shoppers)Potato Chips Are Most Frequently Purchased Snack TypeFigure 1-3: Snacks Usually/Normally Purchased: By Product Type, March 2011 (percent ofU.S. grocery shoppers)Majority of Shoppers Stick to National/Name Brand SnacksAfternoon, Evening, At-Home Snacks the Most PopularChapter 2: The MarketIntroductionScope of ReportTwo Classifications: Sweet and Salty/SavoryReport MethodologyMarket Size and CompositionU.S. Snack Market Approaches $64 BillionTable 2-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Snack Foods, 2006-2010 (in billions of dollars)Salty/Savory Increases Share of Snacks MarketFigure 2-1: Share of SymphonyIRI-Tracked Snack Sales by Classification: Sweet vs.Salty/Savory, 2006 vs. 2010 (percent)Figure 2-2: Share of SymphonyIRI-Tracked Snack Sales: By Sweet Category, 2006 vs. 2010(percent)Figure 2-3: Share of SymphonyIRI-Tracked Snack Sales: By Salty/Savory Category, 2006vs. 2010 (percent)Candy Tops in Sweet Snacks Market ShareSalty Snacks Dominate Salty/Savory ClassificationTable 2-2: Share of SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales of Sweet Snacks by Product Category,2009 vs. 2010 (percent)Table 2-3: Share of SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales of Salty/Savory Snacks by ProductCategory, 2009 vs. 2010 (percent)Dollar and Volume Sales Keep PaceTable 2-4: SymphonyIRI-Tracked Retail Sales of Snack Foods by Dollar and Volume Growth,2009-2010 (in millions of dollars and pounds)Salty/Savory Snacks Top List of Dollar GrowthTable 2-5: Selected Snack Food Segments by Dollar Growth/Loss in SymphonyIRI-TrackedDollar Sales, 2009-2010 (in millions of dollars)Table 2-6: SymphonyIRI-Tracked Retail Sales of Snack Foods by Segment, Classificationand Category, 2009-2010 (in millions of dollars)Supermarkets Account for 41% of Snack MarketFigure 2-4: Share of U.S. Snack Market Sales by Retail Channel, 2010 (percent)Market OutlookSlow Economic Recovery Influences SpendingConsumers Remain ThriftyTable 2-7: Consumer Attitudes: “Price Not Main Factor in Purchases” and “Spending More onConsumer Products,” February 2011 (percent)Table 2-8: Responses to Statements Related to Grocery Spending, February 2011 (percent)Food Costs Stabilize, But May Rise AgainTable 2-9: Consumer Price Index for Food at Home and Selected Snack Categories: 2001-2010Stealth Downsizing
  4. 4. Specialty Snacks Still AffordableA Culture of SnackingStudies Examine Kids’ Snacking HabitsKids’ “Better For You” Snacks High in Sugar, FatReformulation Not Enough?Eating HealthyHealthy Snacks in DemandGluten-Free and Other Allergy ConcernsPortion Control and ConvenienceNatural and OrganicTable 2-10: Consumer Opinion on Natural and Organic Products, February 2011 (percent)Environmental Concerns“Green” PackagingFood SafetyU.S. Snack Market to Reach $77 Billion in 2015Table 2-11: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Snack Foods, 2010-2015 (in billions of dollars)Chapter 3: Competitive TrendsMultinational Conglomerates DominateMergers and AcquisitionsKraft/CadburyDiamond Foods/Kettle Foods/PringlesSnyder’s-LanceLink Industries and JBSOther AcquisitionsPrivate-Label Sales Outpace Market GrowthTable 3-1: SymphonyIRI-Tracked Retail Sales of Private-Label Snack Foods byClassification, Category and Segment, 2009-2010 (in millions of dollars)Illustration 3-1: Wholesome Goodness Cereal BarsTrend Overview by ClassificationTrends in Sweet SnacksCandy Dominates Sweet ClassificationTable 3-2: Share of Sweet Classification Sales by Category, 2009 vs. 2010 (percent)Candy Sales by SegmentFigure 3-1: Share of Chocolate Candy Sub-Category Sales by Segment, 2009 vs. 2010(percent)Figure 3-2: Share of Non-Chocolate Candy Sub-Category Sales by Segment, 2009 vs. 2010(percent)Hershey Dominant Force in Chocolate Sub-CategoryTable 3-3: Top Marketers and Brands of Chocolate Candy Box/Bag/Bar > 3.5 oz. bySymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Table 3-4: Top Marketers and Brands of Chocolate Candy Box/Bag/Bar < 3.5 oz. bySymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Table 3-5: Top Marketers and Brands of Sugar-Free Chocolate Candy by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Mars Leads in Non-Chocolate CandyTable 3-6: Top Marketers and Brands of Non-Chocolate Chewy Candy by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Table 3-7: Top Marketers and Brands of Sugar-Free Diet Candy by SymphonyIRI-TrackedSales and Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)
  5. 5. Cookies and Bakery SnacksFigure 3-3: Share of Cookies and Bakery Snacks Category Sales by Segment, 2009 vs. 2010(percent)Kraft Accounts for One-Third of Cookie SegmentTable 3-8: Top Marketers and Brands of Cookies by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and MarketShare, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Food BarsFigure 3-4: Share of Food Bars Category Sales by Segment, 2009 vs. 2010 (percent)General Mills Increases Lead in Granola Bar SegmentTable 3-9: Top Marketers and Brands of Granola Bars by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales andMarket Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Gains Across the Board in Nutritional/Intrinsic Health Value Bar SegmentTable 3-10: Top Marketers and Brands of Nutritional/Intrinsic Health Value Bars bySymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Fruit SnacksFigure 3-5: Share of Fruit Snacks Category Sales by Segment, 2009 vs. 2010 (percent)Raisins Best-Selling Dried Fruit VarietyTable 3-11: Types of Dried Fruit by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Segment Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)General Mills Corners Over Half of Dry Fruit Snacks MarketTable 3-12: Top Marketers and Brands of Dry Fruit Snacks by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Salesand Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Fruit Cups/Bowls Marketers Experience LossesTable 3-13: Top Marketers and Brands of Fruit Cups by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales andMarket Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Trends in Salty/Savory SnacksSalty Snacks Maintain Hold on Classification SalesFigure 3-6: Share of Salty/Savory Classification Sales by Category, 2009 vs. 2010 (percent)Salty SnacksFigure 3-7: Share of Salty Snacks Category Sales by Segment, 2009 vs. 2010 (percent)Frito-Lay Potato Chip PowerhouseTable 3-14: Top Marketers and Brands of Potato Chips by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales andMarket Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Tortilla/Tostada Chip Segment Loses SteamTable 3-15: Top Marketers and Brands of Tortilla/Tostada Chips by SymphonyIRI-TrackedSales and Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)CrackersFigure 3-8: Share of Crackers Category Sales by Segment, 2009 vs. 2010 (percent)Kraft’s Ritz Is Best-Selling “All Other Crackers” BrandTable 3-16: Top Marketers and Brands of All Other Crackers by SymphonyIRI-TrackedSales, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Kellogg Sees Greatest Dollar Growth in Crackers with FillingsTable 3-17: Top Marketers and Brands of Crackers with Fillings by SymphonyIRI-TrackedSales, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Nut SnacksFigure 3-9: Share of Nut Snacks Category Sales by Segment, 2009 vs. 2010 (percent)Kraft’s Planters King of Snack Nuts Despite LossesTable 3-18: Top Marketers and Brands of Snack Nuts by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales andMarket Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Private Label Claims Half of Nutritional Snacks/Trail Mixes Sales
  6. 6. Table 3-19: Top Marketers and Brands of Nutritional Snacks/Trail Mixes by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Popcorn and Rice/Popcorn CakesFigure 3-10: Share of Popcorn and Rice/Popcorn Cakes Category Sales by Segment, 2009vs. 2010 (percent)Table 3-20: Top Marketers and Brands of RTE Popcorn/Caramel Corn by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Dried Meat SnacksFigure 3-11: Share of Dried Meat Snacks Category Sales by Segment, 2009 vs. 2010(percent)Table 3-21: Top Marketers and Brands of Jerky by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and MarketShare, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Table 3-22: Top Marketers and Brands of All Other Dried Meat Snacks by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2010-2011 (in millions of dollars)Chapter 4: Marketing and New Product TrendsNew Snack Product Introductions RecoverTable 4-1: Number of U.S. Food Product Introductions: Overall, Sweet Snacks andSalty/Savory Snacks, 2000-2010Sweet Categories Lead in New Product IntrosTable 4-2: Number of U.S. Snack Food Product Introductions by Product Category, 2006-2010“Natural” Tag Tops Claims ListTable 4-3: Top Product Claims/Tags for U.S. Snack Food Product Introductions, 2010(number and percent)Natural-Related Claims Going StrongTable 4-4: Number of New Snack Food Product Introductions by Top Natural-RelatedPackage Tags/Claims, 2008-2010Health-Related Claims Reclaiming Lost GroundTable 4-5: Number of New Snack Food Product Introductions by Top Health-RelatedPackage Tags/Claims, 2008-2010Special Diets Tags Steadily IncreaseTable 4-6: Number of New Snack Food Product Introductions by Top Special Diet-RelatedPackage Tags/Claims, 2008-2010Kraft Leads in 2010 Product IntroductionsTable 4-7: Top Ten Leading U.S. Marketers of Snack Foods Based on Number of Stock-Keeping Unit (SKU)Introductions, 2006-2010U.S. Leads Global Snack Food IntroductionsTable 4-8: Number of Snack Foods Introductions by Country, 2006-2010 (number ofreports)Trends in Sweet SnacksBite-Sized Snacks Make Big ImpactIllustration 4-1: Reese’s MinisFocus on Hershey.Illustration 4-2: Hershey’s DropsIndulgence Meets Better-For-YouIllustration 4-3: Think Thin Chocolate Covered Strawberries BarFocus on Kraft FoodsNot Your Grandmother’s Fruit
  7. 7. Illustration 4-4: Hershey’s Extra Dark Chocolate with PomegranateSweet and Salty Snacks Combine Two Favorite TastesIllustration 4-5: Pretzel M&M’sMore Than Functional: SuperfoodsIllustration 4-6: Odwalla Blueberry Swirl Superfood BarConvenience: On-the-Go SnackingIllustration 4-7: General Mills Simply Fruit Roll-UpsTrends in Salty/Savory SnacksSweet on NutsIllustration 4-8: Nutorious Nut Confections Cranberry Orange TangoFocus on PlantersIllustration 4-9: Planters Chili Lime AlmondsBold Is BetterIllustration 4-10: Terra Exotic Harvest ChipsIllustration 4-11: Ruffles Molten Hot Wings Potato ChipsBrand Profile: Walmart’s World TableIllustration 4-12: World Table Tortilla ChipsTaking Popcorn to the Next LevelIllustration 4-13: 479° PopcornFocus on Popcorn, IndianaIllustration 4-14: Popcorn, Indiana Chip’InsMarketers Deliver Lower Sodium SnacksIllustration 4-15: Triscuit Hint of SaltFocus on Frito-Lay (PepsiCo)Cross-Market TrendsInterest in Natural and Organic Products Remains StrongIllustration 4-16: Safeway’s O Organic SnacksGeneral Mills’ Small Planet Foods DivisionMarket for Gluten-Free Snacks ExplodesMarketers, Mother Earth Benefit from Environmental InitiativesFocus on Diamond Foods’ Kettle ChipsIllustration 4-17: Kettle Chips Bio-BeetleTrends in Kids SnacksIllustration 4-18: Goldfish Flavor Blasted GrahamsIllustration 4-19: Fresh & Easy Goodness for Kids Multigrain ChipsBrand Profile: PepsiCo/Tropicana TropolisIllustration 4-20: Tropicana Tropolis FlavorsChapter 5: Consumer TrendsShopper InsightsMethodologyMajority of Americans Seek Healthy LifestylesFigure 5-1: Consumer Psychographics: Physical Health and Fitness, March 2011 (percent ofU.S. grocery shoppers)Groceries and Consumer Health GoalsFigure 5-2: Consumer Psychographics: Healthy Eating and Dieting, March 2011 (percent ofU.S. grocery shoppers)Low Sugar, High Fiber Are Most Popular Healthy Product PositioningsFigure 5-3: Purchasing of Food and Beverage Products by Selected Package Labels/Claims,March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)
  8. 8. Shopper Use of Grocery CouponsFigure 5-4: Types of Coupons Used During Grocery Shopping Trips, March 2011 (percent ofU.S. grocery shoppers who use coupons)Table 5-1: Sources of Coupons Used During Grocery Shopping Trips, March 2011 (percent ofU.S. grocery shoppers who use coupons)Potato Chips Are Most Frequently Purchased Snack TypeFigure 5-5: Snacks Usually/Normally Purchased: By Product Type, March 2011 (percent ofU.S. grocery shoppers)Figure 5-6: Percent of Snacks Purchased on Sale: By Product Type, March 2011 (percent ofU.S. grocery shoppers)Figure 5-7: Planned vs. Impulse Snack Purchases: By Product Type, March 2011 (percent ofU.S. grocery shoppers)Table 5-2: Response to Question “Did you choose a product that you usually buy?”: BySnack Product Type, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)Majority of Shoppers Stick to National/Name Brand SnacksTable 5-3: Type of Brand Purchased During Grocery Shopping Trips: By Snack Product Type,March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)Table 5-4: Price Comparison of Snack Products Purchased, Compared to Similar Products,March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)Table 5-5: Motivations (Other Than Price/Promotion) for Selection of Snacks Purchased: ByProduct Type, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)Snacking PatternsAfternoon, Evening Snacks Are Most PopularTable 5-6: Meals/Snacks Typically Eaten: Overall and by Gender, March 2011 (percent ofU.S. grocery shoppers)Table 5-7: Mealtime and Snacking Patterns: By Gender, March 2011 (percent of U.S.grocery shoppers)Table 5-8: Patterns for Snacking Alone or with Others: Weekdays vs. Weekends, March2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)At-Home Snacks More PopularTable 5-9: Patterns for Snacking at Home or Away from Home: Weekdays vs. Weekends,March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)Table 5-10: Patterns for Snacking in Home Kitchen or Elsewhere in Home: Weekdays vs.Weekends, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)Table 5-11: Patterns for Snacking at Table, at Kitchen Counter, or Elsewhere in Home:Weekdays vs. Weekends, March 2011 (percent of U.S. grocery shoppers)Usage Trends and Demographic Patterns: Sweet SnacksCookies Most Popular Sweet CategoryTable 5-12: Usage Overview for Sweet Snack Products: 2006, 2008 and 2010 (percent ofU.S. households)Who’s Eating CookiesTable 5-13: Demographic Indexes for Cookies: Overall and By Selected Brands, 2010 (U.S.households)Who’s Eating CandyTable 5-14: Demographic Indexes for Candy: Overall and by Selected Brands, 2010 (U.S.households)Who’s Eating Food Bars and Fruit SnacksTable 5-15: Demographic Indexes for Food Bars and Fruit Snacks, 2010 (U.S. households)Usage Trends and Demographic Patterns: Salty/Savory SnacksPotato Chips Most Popular Salty/Savory Category
  9. 9. Table 5-16: Usage Overview for Salty/Savory Snack Products: 2006, 2008 and 2010(percent of U.S. households)Who’s Eating Potato ChipsTable 5-17: Demographic Indexes for Potato Chips: Overall and by Selected Brands, 2010(U.S. households)Who’s Eating CrackersTable 5-18: Demographic Indexes for Crackers: Overall and by Selected Brands, 2010 (U.S.households)Who’s Eating Corn/Tortilla Chips and Cheese SnacksTable 5-19: Demographic Indexes for Corn/Tortilla Chips and Cheese Snacks: Overall andby Selected Brands, 2010 (U.S. households)Who’s Eating PretzelsTable 5-20: Demographic Indexes for Pretzels: Overall and by Selected Brands, 2010 (U.S.households)Chapter 6: Looking AheadTrends and OpportunitiesSnacking as a Way of Life“Better-for-you” Snack Products in High DemandLow-Sodium Trend Increases MomentumGrowing Number of Products Target Special Dietary NeedsStricter Guidelines for NaturalSnacks Get SmallerPrivate-Label Products Sustain Consumer Interest“Green” Concerns Once More a PriorityPackaged Snacks Compete with FreshRetailers Expand Snack SelectionSmall Format Stores Regain Lost GroundNatural and Organic Food Continues Move to MainstreamMass Merchandisers Morph Into SupercentersC-Stores and Drugstores Battle for On-the-Go Snack ShareE-Marketing Snack FoodsSocial Networking: Facebook, Twitter, Then…Location-Based Social Media: Yelp, Foursquare and Google PlacesFocus on Savings: Groupon, Woot and BlippyWhat’s Next: Social Media Aggregators and Mobile ConnectivityAppendix: Addresses of Selected MarketersAbout Us:ReportsnReports is an online library of over 100,000+ market research reports and in-depthmarket research studies & analysis of over 5000 micro markets. We provide 24/7 online andoffline support to our customers. Get in touch with us for your needs of market researchreports.Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/marketsreports
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