Rollout of non residential smart meters in the uk

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Check for Discount on Rollout of Non-Residential Smart Meters in the UK report by Datamonitor.

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Rollout of non residential smart meters in the uk

  1. 1. Rollout of Non-Residential Smart Meters in the UKThe report discusses the economics of introducing smart metering technology to the non-residential sector in the UK, including the total market at the macro level and the cost/benefitanalysis at an individual customer site level. The objective is to give suppliers and marketparticipants an understanding of the scale of the challenge and to enable them to invest in thetechnology with confidence.Features and benefits  Facilitate business planning through a clear understanding of the size and timing of the smart metering challenge in the non-residential sector.  Define your medium- to long-term investment requirements by taking into account the size and composition of your customer base.  Understand, at a customer site level, the drivers of the costs and benefits of installing a smart meter for different customer profiles.  Understand the pricing options for different customer categories, enabling efficient sharing of the economic benefits of smart meters.  Identify the critical success factors for a successful and efficient rollout of smart meters across your customer base.HighlightsThere are almost 4 million non-residential electricity and gas customers in the UK who arecovered by the government mandate to install a smart or advanced meter over the next few years.It is suppliers’ responsibility to drive customer take-up, although they will need to rely on"carrots" rather than "sticks" in doing so.Up to 95% of eligible non-residential sites are expected to have a smart meter installed by 2020.This represents an investment commitment of more than £500m, to be contested by equipmentvendors and meter installation and IT services contractors. Some 80% of those funds are likely tobe spent in the four years between 2014 and 2017.With the new smart metering technology, most non-residential customers will be able to realizesubstantial cost benefits through a reduction in their energy spend. More benefits will beavailable for electricity customers by shifting some consumption to off-peak times of day,provided that suppliers offer tariffs incentivizing them to do so.Your key questions answered  How many smart meter installations should I plan for, and how much are they going to cost, given my projected customer base?
  2. 2.  How should I time the rollout across my customer base: wait until there is more certainty in later years, get an early start or build up an even pace?  Which of my customer sites should I target first, based on the cost/benefit balance?  Which levers can I engage to minimize the deployment costs and maximize the ongoing benefits?  Which pricing mechanisms should I offer customers with a smart meter, to maximize the benefits to them and me? Can I recoup the investment?Buy your copy of this report @ http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/184107-rollout-of-non-residential-smart-meters-in-the-uk.htmlReport Details:Published: July 2012No. of Pages: 65Price: Single User License: US$ 2900 Corporate User License: US$ 7250Table of contentsAbout the authorDisclaimerEXECUTIVE SUMMARYOpportunity sizingRollout economicsLevers of a successful rolloutOpportunity sizingSummaryIntroductionSize of addressable customer baseMandatory targetsCurrent installed baseInstalled base forecastAchievable penetration ratesTechnology choiceRamp-up timingsMarket valueRollout cost structureUnit cost estimatesVendor opportunity
  3. 3. Rollout economicsSummaryIntroductionCustomer benefitsSources of customer benefitIllustrative customer scenariosSupplier benefitsSources of supplier benefitIllustrative supplier scenariosBenefit sharingTariff innovations for electricity customersTariff rises for gas customersInvestment scenariosBase case scenariosPrice sensitivitiesLevers of a successful rolloutSummaryIntroductionCritical success factorsTaxonomy of critical success factorsOutcome sensitivities of critical success factorsRecommendationsRecommendations for suppliersRecommendations for other market participantsList Of TablesTable: Electricity customer type definitions (conceptual), 2012Table: Switchover targets by customer type (conceptual), 2012–19fTable: Number of SME electricity and gas sites in the UK (million units), 2012eTable: Number of smart/advanced meter installations (million units), 2020fTable: Deployment phasing strategies (percentage of total per annum), 2012–19fTable: Cumulative smart/advanced meter installations (million units), 2012–20fTable: Estimated unit costs of on-site equipment (£), 2012–20fTable: Projected installation costs per site (£), 2012–20fTable: Annual supplier capex (£m), 2012–20fTable: Customer benefit scenario, SME 3–4 electricity user (£ per annum), 2014f–20fTable: Customer benefit scenario, SME 3–4 gas user (£ per annum), 2014f–20fTable: Supplier benefit scenario, SME 3–4 electricity user (£ per annum), 2014f–20fTable: Supplier benefit scenario, SME 3–4 gas user (£ per annum), 2014f–20fTable: Scenarios of benefit allocation, typical electricity site (£ per annum), 2014f–20fTable: Scenarios of benefit allocation, typical gas site (£ per annum), 2014f–20fTable: Base case investment scenarios (£ per site), 2014f–20f
  4. 4. Table: NPV and break-even of converting a typical electricity site (£), 2014f–20fTable: NPV and break-even of converting a typical gas site (£), 2014f–20fTable: NPV of total benefit per site vs suppliers market share (£), 2014f–20fTable: NPV of total benefit per site vs to take-up rate (£), 2014f–20fTable: NPV of total benefit per site vs first-time installation rate (£), 2014f–20fTable: NPV of total benefit per site vs reduction in consumption (£), 2014f–20fTable: NPV of total benefit per site vs peak/off-peak substitution (£), 2014f–20fTable: NPV of total benefit per site vs WACC (£), 2014f–20fList Of FiguresFigure: Number of SME electricity and gas sites in the UK (million units), 2012eFigure: Number of smart/advanced meter installations (million units), 2020fFigure: Deployment phasing strategies (percentage of total per annum), 2012–19fFigure: Cumulative smart/advanced meter installations (million units), 2012–20fFigure: Smart metering cost structure (conceptual), 2012–20fFigure: Non-residential on-premises hardware configuration (schematic), 2012–20fFigure: Estimated unit costs of on-site equipment (£), 2012–20fFigure: Projected installation costs per site (£), 2012–20fFigure: Annual supplier capex (£m), 2012–20fFigure: Customer benefit scenario, SME 3–4 electricity user (£ per annum), 2014–20fFigure: Customer benefit scenario, SME 3–4 gas user (£ per annum), 2014–20fFigure: Supplier benefit scenario, SME 3–4 electricity user (£ per annum), 2014–20fFigure: Supplier benefit scenario, SME 3–4 gas user (£ per annum), 2014–20fFigure: Scenarios of benefit allocation, typical electricity site (£ per annum), 2014–20fFigure: Scenarios of benefit allocation, typical gas site (£ per annum), 2014f–20fFigure: Base case investment scenarios (£ per site), 2014f–0fFigure: NPV and break-even of converting a typical electricity site (£), 2014f–20fFigure: NPV and break-even of converting a typical gas site (£), 2014f–20fFigure: NPV of total benefit per site vs suppliers market share (£), 2014f–20fFigure: NPV of total benefit per site vs take-up rate (£), 2014f–20fFigure: NPV of total benefit per site vs first-time installation rate (£), 2014f–20fFigure: NPV of total benefit per site vs reduction in consumption (£), 2014f–20fFigure: NPV of total benefit per site vs peak/off-peak substitution (£), 2014f–20fFigure: NPV of total benefit per site vs WACC (£), 2014f–20fContact: sales@reportsandreports.com for further details.

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