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Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S.
 

Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S.

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    Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S. Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S. Document Transcript

    • Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S.Published: May 2011No. of Pages: 252Price: $ 3300Many of the more than 43 million kids have become quite food savvy as a result of watchingTV cooking shows with their foodie parents and being exposed to new foods while travelingand eating out. This has created both opportunities and challenges for developers andmarketers, as kids have become more willing to explore new foods, but at the same timemore discriminating when it comes to food selection. Marketers’ greatest concern used towas the gatekeeper, who ultimately made the decision to purchase a product. But today,the little foodies of the world expect more from what they are being served … more in termsof presentation, taste, and quality.Fact is, the kids’ food market is a broad and complex one, spanning numerous categoriesand product segments. In Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S., Packaged Factsqualifies a food as being a kids’ food when it has a taste kids love; nutrition kids need; orentertainment kids crave. Ideally the product possesses all three of these characteristics.This is accomplished through formulation, packaging, and marketing.There are a number of reasons why food marketers are developing products specifically forthe 2- to 12-year-old age group. For starters, this demographic represents about one-seventh of the population. It is also the most influential demographic for marketers. Life-long dietary habits are established during this 10-year age span, and brand loyalty begins.These factors and more are influencing the $10 billion market for children’s food andbeverages.Scope of ReportThis report focuses on retail-packaged food and beverage products, or simply foods,targeted to children in the 2- to 12-year-old age group. Packaged Facts divides the kidsmarket into three segments:• 2- to 5-year-olds, or preschoolers;• 6- to 9-year-olds, or younger kids; and• 10- to 12-year-olds, or tweens.
    • Report MethodologyThe information contained in this report was obtained from primary and secondary research.Primary research entailed consultations with food and beverage market sources and on-site examination of retail venues. Secondary research included extensive Internetcanvassing and research- and data-gathering from relevant consumer business and tradepublications; company reports including annual reports, press releases, and investorconference calls; company profiles in trade and consumer publications; government reports;and other food and beverage market reports by Packaged Facts.Our consumer demographics analysis draws primarily on data compiled by ExperianSimmons, New York. Each year, Experian Simmons surveys a large sample of consumersabout their personal and household buying habits. The results cited in this report are basedon the Spring 2010 survey (April 2009 to June 2010), and on a sample size of 23,572adults, which represents approximately 115 million households. Of these households, 22%,or 25,085, have children under the age of 12-years old.Additionally, data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)provides insight into children and the obesity epidemic. Data on new product introductionsare based on Product Launch Analytics, a Datamonitor service. Various sales estimates anddata pertaining to marketers of children’s food and beverage products are partially derivedfrom figures based on SymphonyIRI sales tracked through U.S. supermarkets and grocerystores, drugstores, and mass merchandisers (including Target and Kmart, but excludingWalmart) with annual sales of $2 million or more.Market Insights: A Selection From The ReportTraditional vs. Better-for-You SharesThe $10 billion kids market can also be broken down into traditional and better-for-youproducts. Packaged Facts estimates that in 2010, 40%, or $4 billion of the kids foodmarket, could be described as having some better-for-you element. This includes productswith claims such as "made with whole wheat" and "lower sugar." The other 60%, or $6billion of products, are described as traditional. The primary sub-category that keeps thetraditional segment in the lead is ice cream/novelties. Even most fruit chews/gummies nowsport a "contains 100% of the Daily Value for vitamin C" claim, while about a half of asepticjuice/fruit drinks are now described as "lower sugar." Packaged Facts anticipates that thisshare of sales will flip-flop by 2015. [Figure 3-3]"The Power of Protein at the Breakfast Table"Thats the phrase used to introduce the section of Sara Lees 2010 annual report that isdevoted to the Jimmy Dean brand, which is named after the country singer and sausage
    • entrepreneur whose business the company acquired in the 1980s. Sara Lee describes thebrand as a "protein breakfast platform."According to Packaged Facts Frozen Foods in the U.S., 3rd Edition (January 2011), JimmyDean corners the breakfast hand-held market, with a year-over-year gain of $43 million forthe 52 weeks ending October 5, 2010 in channels tracked by SymphonyIRI; a total of $214million in sales; and a 57% share of the breakfast hand-held category. And FrozenConvenience Foods in the U.S. (Packaged Facts, December 2010) reports that Sara Lee alsoleads the breakfast entrees category. Together, the Jimmy Dean products grew 5% in the52 weeks ending July 11, 2010 to reach sales of $133 million. That constituted a 35% shareof breakfast entrees. The main difference between Sara Lees fortunes in the two categoriesis that while it leads in frozen breakfast entrees, it completely dominates in frozen breakfasthand-helds.Where Consumers Buy Kids Foods and BeveragesIn terms of purchasing kids foods, Packaged Facts estimates that the majority of Americashops traditional supermarkets (60%) followed by mass merchandisers (25%). However,just as mainstream America shops a variety of retail outlets, so do parents purchasing kidsfoods. In fact, thanks to organic/natural/specialty foods stores efforts to appeal to parentswith "more-healthful" kids products, this outlet is giving more traditional venues someserious competition when it comes to kids foods. It controls 10% of the market.Club stores have a mere 3% share of dollar sales of kids foods, as offerings are mostlylimited to juice boxes and some snacks. All other channels make up the remaining 2%share.Kids foods, as defined in this report, are often too segmented for many of these otherchannels to carry many SKUS, if any. [Figure 6-4]Table Of ContentsChapter 1: Executive SummaryIntroductionScope of ReportReport MethodologyWhat Makes a Food a Kids’ Food?Retail Channels CoveredWhy Target Kids?The Regulatory EnvironmentThe MarketA Conservative Assessment: 2010 Sales Hit $10 Billion
    • Table 1-1: Total U.S. Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages, 2005-2015 (in millions ofdollars)Kids’ Market Broken Down Into 7 Categories, Plus “Other”Figure 1-1: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages, Dollar Sales and Percent Share byCategory, 2010Traditional vs. Better-for-You SharesThe MarketersGeneral Mills Is a Market PowerhouseCampbell Soup Shakes the SaltConAgra Encourages Kids to Play with Their FoodNestlé Focuses on NutritionSara Lee Gets to the Meat of the MatterFresh & Easy Is a Committed “Green” GrocerStonyfield Farm’s “Yo” Brands for YoungstersNature’s Path Grows a Business From the (Organic) Ground UpAnnie’s Helps You “Eat Responsibly, Act Responsibly”Ians Natural Foods Blazes Trail in Allergy-sensitiveMarketing OverviewFood Advertising to Kids in the 21st CenturyMany Options on How to Reach KidsMarketing to KidsKids AdvertisingReaching Kids via Online Games, Texting, and MoreThe MarketplaceThe New Food ShopperWhere Consumers Buy Kids’ Foods and BeveragesFigure 1-2: U.S. Retail Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages, by Outlet, 2010Safeway Leads in the Private Label Kids’ Food SectorThe ConsumerKids’ Population Totals 43.4 MillionA Bunch of Little FoodiesYounger Kids’ Population to Experience Below-Average GrowthTable 1-2: Select Age Group Projections, 2010 vs. 2015
    • Number of Hispanics Under Age 14 to increase 14% by 2015Table 1-3: Change in Population of Kids Under the Age of 14, by Race and Hispanic Origin,2010 vs. 2015 (in thousands)The Prevalence of Obesity Among Today’s KidsFigure 1-3: Prevalence of Overweight Children, Ages 6 to 11, by gender, 1963-2004Parents Will Choose Natural for Their KidsOrganic Reigns with Parents, TooWhat Parents Will Buy For Their KidsTable 1-4: Percent of Adults Who Purchased Select Kids’ Foods, Fall 2010The Impact of the Recession on Kids’ Food PurchasesTable 1-5: How the Recession Has Impacted Purchases, Fall 2010New Products and TrendsUnique Nutritional Needs Drive InnovationKids’ Foods and Beverages Are BoomingTable 1-6: Total Number of Product Lines and SKUs Introduced to the U.S. MarketplaceTargeted to Kids, 2005-2010Single-Serving Is the Leading ClaimIngredients to NoteChapter 2: The ProductsKey PointsProducts AnalyzedScope of ReportWhat Makes a Food a Kids’ Food?Making the CutCandy Is a Treat, Not a Food for This ReportFoodservice Not a FocusRetail Channels CoveredWhen Kids Started Getting Their Own Foods and BeveragesProducts for Kids
    • Why Target Kids?Kids Population Totals 43 MillionTable 2-1: Size of Kids Population as Percent of Total U.S. Population, 2008Table 2-2: Size of Kids Population by Single Year of Age, 2- to 12-year-olds, 2008Kids Population to Remain SteadyTable 2-3: Selected Age Groups as Percent of Total Population, 2010 vs. 2015Government Influence on Kids’ ProductsAround One-Third of These Kids Are Overweight or ObeseWhite House Task Force on Childhood ObesityThe Task Force ReportExploring the Five Areas of the Task Force ReportGetting Children a Healthy Start on LifeEmpowering Parents and CaregiversProviding Healthy Food in SchoolsImproving Access to Healthy, Affordable FoodGetting Children More Physically ActiveNext Steps for Federal AgenciesThe Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010Federal RegulationsThe Regulatory EnvironmentLabeling NomenclatureProvide the Facts: Nutritional Information MustsProducts Exempt from Nutrition LabelingNutrition Regulations in FoodserviceFDA Calls On Food Industry to Correct Labeling ViolationsTable 2-4: Kids’ Products Receiving FDA Labeling Violation LettersKellogg to Pay Millions in Kids’ Attention Class Action SettlementHealth, Nutrient Content, and Structure/Function ClaimsSignificant Scientific Agreement Health ClaimsQualified Health Claims
    • Nutrient Content ClaimsStructure/Function ClaimsLabeling AllergensMarketing Label ClaimsFat ContentLocally ProducedOrganicNo Added HormonesOmega-3 Fatty AcidsHealthyNaturalChapter 3: The MarketKey PointsMarket Size: Yesterday, Today and TomorrowA Conservative Assessment: 2010 Sales Hit $10 BillionTable 3-1: Total U.S. Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages, 2005-2015 (in millions of dollars)Figure 3-1: Total U.S. Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages, 2005-2015 (in millions of dollars)Market CompositionKids’ Market Broken Down Into 7 Categories, Plus “Other”Table 3-2: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages, Dollar Sales and Percent Share by Category,2010Figure 3-2: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages, Dollar Sales and Percent Share by Category,2010Traditional vs. Better-for-You SharesFigure 3-3: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages, Percent Share by Better-for-You Description,2010The Beverage BusinessTable 3-3: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Beverages, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share,2010
    • Figure 3-4: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Beverages, by Percent Share of Dollar Sales,2010Table 3-4: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Beverages, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (inmillions of dollars)Figure 3-5: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Beverages, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (inmillions of dollars)It’s a Cold Cereal World for KidsTable 3-5: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Cereal, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share,2010Figure 3-6: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Cereal, by Percent Share of Dollar Sales, 2010Table 3-6: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Cereal, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (in millionsof dollars)Figure 3-7: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Cereal, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (in millionsof dollars)Dairy Is a Natural for KidsTable 3-7: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Dairy Products, by Dollar Sales and PercentShare, 2010Figure 3-8: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Dairy Products, by Percent Share of DollarSales, 2010Table 3-8: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Dairy Products, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (inmillions of dollars)Figure 3-9: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Dairy Products, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (inmillions of dollars)Frozen Foods Are All About ConvenienceTable 3-9: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Frozen Foods, by Dollar Sales and PercentShare, 2010Figure 3-10: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Frozen Foods, by Percent Share of DollarSales, 2010Table 3-10: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Frozen Foods, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (inmillions of dollars)Figure 3-11: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Frozen Foods, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (inmillions of dollars)Shelf-Stable Meals Are All About Shapes
    • Table 3-11: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Meals, Shelf-Stable, by Dollar Sales andPercent Share, 2010Figure 3-12: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Meals, Shelf-Stable, by Percent Share ofDollar Sales, 2010Table 3-12: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Meals, Shelf-Stable, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (in millions of dollars)Figure 3-13: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Meals, Shelf-Stable, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (in millions of dollars)Opportunities with Fruits and VeggiesTable 3-13: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Produce, by Dollar Sales and Percent Share,2010Figure 3-14: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Produce, by Percent Share of Dollar Sales,2010Table 3-14: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Produce, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (inmillions of dollars)Figure 3-15: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Produce, by Dollar Sales, 2005-2015 (inmillions of dollars)Snack Attack: Bars for Kids Are Driving GrowthTable 3-15: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Snacks, Salty and Sweet, by Dollar Sales andPercent Share, 2010Figure 3-16: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Snacks, Salty and Sweet, by Percent Share ofDollar Sales, 2010Table 3-16: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Snacks, Salty and Sweet, by Dollar Sales,2005-2015 (in millions of dollars)Figure 3-17: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages: Snacks, Salty and Sweet, by Dollar Sales,2005-2015 (in millions of dollars)The Other CategoryShare of Market Changes Slightly in 2015Table 3-17: U.S. Kids’ Foods and Beverages, Dollar Sales and Percent Share by Category,2010 vs. 2015Chapter 4: The MarketersKey Points
    • Selection CriteriaGeneral Mills Claims Leadership in Healthier Kids’ CerealsA Powerhouse in Kids’ Cereal, Yogurt, and Fruit SnacksFigure 4-1: Fruit Roll-Ups Simply Fruit WildberryCampbell Soup Shakes the SaltA Distinguished Tradition of Promoting Kids’ Health and Well-beingSoup Sales Are Lukewarm…Table 4-1: Campbell Soup Company, Net Sales By Reportable Segment, 2010 vs. 2009 (inmillions of dollars)Table 4-2: Select Campbell Products by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales, Soup and CannedPasta (52 Weeks Ending Oct 3, 2010 vs. Year-Ago Sales)But Pepperidge Farm Performs SwimminglyTable 4-3: Select Pepperidge Farm Goldfish Products by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales (52Weeks Ending Oct 3, 2010 vs. Year-Ago Sales)Condensed Soups: “Great taste, new look, easier to find.”Figure 4-2: Pepperidge Farm Goldfish Colors Neon CrackersConAgra Encourages Kids to Play with Their FoodKid Cuisine Offends the Prevention InstituteFigure 4-3: KCs Flip n Dip PancakesFigure 4-4: Chef Boyardee Whole Grain ABC & 123 With MeatballsKazoozles Aside, Nestlé Focuses on NutritionA Truly Novel NoveltySara Lee Gets to the Meat of the MatterTable 4-4: Top Marketers and Brands of Kids’ Bread by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales 52Weeks Ending Oct 3, 2010 vs. Year-Ago Sales“The Power of Protein at the Breakfast Table”Jimmy D’s Protein-tastic Breakfast vs. Crabby, Slo-mo, DimwitFigure 4-5: Jimmy Ds Breakfasts
    • Fresh & Easy Is a Committed “Green” GrocerFigure 4-6: Fresh & Easy Goodness for KidsStonyfield Farm’s “Yo” Brands for YoungstersStonyfield Innovates With “Made from Plants” Yogurt CupFigure 4-7: Stonyfield Farms’ “Made from Plants” Yogurt CupsNature’s Path Grows a Business From the (Organic) Ground UpAnnie’s Helps You Eat Responsibly, Act ResponsiblyQuality Is Guaranteed by Bernie, Rabbit of ApprovalMonitored Sales Are Small, but StrongTable 4-5: Select Annie’s Homegrown Products by SymphonyIRITracked Sales, by Categoryand Product (52 Weeks Ending Oct 3, 2010 vs. Year-Ago Sales)Annie’s Welcomes the Year of the RabbitFigure 4-8: Annie’s Organic Honey Wheat Pretzel Bunnies and Gluten FreeSnickerDoodle Bunny CookiesIans Natural Foods Blazes Trail in Allergy-sensitiveExpansion: An Acquisition…and a MergerAn Emerging Retail PresenceTable 4-6: Select Ian’s Natural Foods Products by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales, byCategory: 52 Weeks Ending Oct 3, 2010 vs. Year-Ago SalesAn Uncommon Onion Ring and Other InnovationsFigure 4-9: Ian’s Gluten-Free Crispy Golden Battered Onion RingsChapter 5: Marketing OverviewKey PointsMarketing Kids’ FoodsFood Advertising to Kids in the 21st Century
    • Many Options on How to Reach KidsBackground on Marketing to KidsVoluntary Presents the ProblemGroups Take ActionKids Advertising Initiative LaunchedStudy Shows Characters Influence Kids, So Do Limit Their UseSample AdsTable 5-1: Advertising Initiative Participants Advertising to Kids and the Foods Approved forAdvertising, 2010Figure 5-1: Lunchables AdFigure 5-2: Kid Cuisine AdFigure 5-3: Campbell’s Healthy Kids Soup AdFigure 5-4: PediaSure AdFigure 5-5: Stonyfield YoBaby AdMarketing Action PlansAction Occurs in 2010, Hopefully Policy Implemented in 2011Proposing Strict Nutrition Standards on Foods Marketed to ChildrenCSPI Threatens to Sue McDonald’sResearch Says Toys Are Not the Driver to Eat at McDonald’sKids’ Meals in San Fran Stay HappyCSPI’s Next StepsDetails on the Interagency DocumentStandard I: Foods Exempt from Standards II and IIIStandard II: Meaningful Contribution to a Healthful DietStandard III: Nutrients to LimitWhy the Delay on the Guidelines?FTC Might Not Be Able to Enforce but It Can Get ToughFTC Gets Nestlé to Drop Deceptive ClaimsKellogg to Pay Millions in Kids’ Attention Class Action SettlementFTC Subpoenas 44 Companies
    • Table 5-2: Marketers Receiving FTC Subpoenas, 2010Don’t Expect FTC to Quiet DownEfforts Are Slowly Paying OffReaching Kids via Online Games, Texting, and MoreChapter 6: The MarketplaceKey PointsThe Retail MarketplaceRetail Distribution MethodsDirect Delivery AdvantagesThe Cost of Face-To-Face BusinessAdvantages of Warehouse DeliverySmaller Marketers Work through BrokersWhere Consumers ShopThe New Food ShopperMethodologyShopping Options Are PlentifulSo Where Are Consumers Shopping?Different Types of Retail OutletsClub Stores:Convenience Stores (C-stores):Discount Stores:Dollar Stores:Drug Stores:Ethnic Food Stores:Natural/Organic/Specialty Foods Stores:Limited Assortment Discount Store:Supercenter:Other:Supermarket:Supermarket Is the Most Frequented ChannelTable 6-1: Primary Store Channel Shopped, percent share, 2005-2010Figure 6-1: Primary Store Channel Shopped, 2006-2010
    • Strategies for Saving on Food PurchasesEating at HomeShop at Secondary StoresSwitching Primary StoresMoney-Saving TacticsFigure 6-2: Money-Saving Measures When Planning the Grocery Trip, 2006-2010Figure 6-3: Economizing Behaviors Inside the Store, 2009-2010Retailers Experience Tough TimesDifferentiating to Attract ShoppersCompeting on Health and Wellness and SustainabilityWho Are the Leading Retailers?Table 6-2: Top-20 U.S. Food and Beverage Retailers, by Dollar Sales and Store Count, 2009(ranked by estimated annual ACV for supermarkets sales)Where Consumers Buy Kids’ Foods and BeveragesFigure 6-4: U.S. Retail Sales of Kids’ Foods and Beverages, by Outlet, 2010Analysis of Kids’ Foods in the Windy CityTable 6-3: Retail Price of Select Kids’ Beverages, by Marketer/Brand, Description/ProductSize, and Price/Retail Outlet, 2010Table 6-4: Retail Price of Select Kids’ Cereals, by Marketer/Brand, Description/Product Size,and Price/Retail Outlet, 2010Table 6-5: Retail Price of Select Kids’ Dairy Products, by Marketer/Brand,Description/Product Size, and Price/Retail Outlet, 2010Table 6-6: Retail Price of Select Kids’ Boxed or Canned, by Marketer/Brand,Description/Product Size, and Price/Retail Outlet, 2010Table 6-7: Retail Price of Select Kids’ Frozen Foods, by Marketer/Brand, Description/ProductSize, and Price/Retail Outlet, 2010Table 6-8: Retail Price of Select Kids’ Produce—Fresh and Shelf-Stable, by Marketer/Brand,Description/Product Size, and Price/Retail Outlet, 2010Table 6-9: Retail Price of Select Kids’ Snacks—Savory a nd Sweet, by Marketer/Brand,Description/Product Size, and Price/Retail Outlet, 2010Table 6-10: Retail Price of Select Kids’ Miscellaneous Foods, by Marketer/Brand,Description/Product Size, and Price/Retail Outlet, 2010
    • Warehouse ClubsMulti-Packs and Family-Size ProductsTable 6-11: U.S. Kids’ Foods: Suggested Club-Store Prices of Selected Products, 2010Private Label Offers Price BreaksSafeway Leads in Private LabelTable 6-12: U.S. Kids’ Foods: Comparative Retail Price of 100% Juice in 6.75-ounce Shelf-Stable Boxes, Private Label vs. Branded, 2010Table 6-13: U.S. Kids’ Foods: Comparative Retail Price of Less-Sugar Juice in 6.75-ounceShelf-Stable Pouches, Private Label vs. Branded, 2010Table 6-14: U.S. Kids’ Foods: Comparative Retail Price of Yogurt in 2.25-ounce Tubes,Private Label vs. Branded, 2010Table 6-15: U.S. Kids’ Foods: Comparative Retail Price of Macaroni & Cheese Shapes in 5.5-ounce Box, Private Label vs. Branded, 2010Private Label PlayersWhole Foods Kills 365 KidsFresh & Easy Is All About Private LabelRetailers’ Efforts in Marketing to KidsKids Have the Power to Increase Retailers’ ProfitsKids’ Food Marketers Are Attracted to Kid-Friendly StoresBabyzone.com’s Retailer Report CardAlbertsonsAndronico’sGiant EagleHarris TeeterHy-VeePublixRaley’sWegman’sWeis MarketsWhole Foods MarketFoodservice OverviewFirst Lady Asks Restaurants to Help Kids Eat BetterSchool Foodservice Cleans Up Its Act
    • Better Beef, and MoreSchwan’s Reduces Sodium in PizzaTyson’s All-in-One Asian ChickenVending Machine Program Offers Better-for-You ChoicesIncentive to Install MachinesChapter 7: The ConsumerKey PointsDemographic DetailsKids’ Population Totals 43.4 MillionTable 7-1: Size of Kids Population by Single Year of Age, 2- to 12-year-olds, 2008Table 7-2: Kids as Percent of Total U.S. Population, 2008A Bunch of Little FoodiesPalates MatureBoys Predominate in Kids’ PopulationTable 7-3: Percent of Males and Females by Selected Age Groups, 2009Younger Kids’ Population to Experience Below-Average GrowthTable 7-4: Select Age Group Projections, 2010 vs. 2015Table 7-5: Selected Age Group Projections as Percent of Total Population, 2010 vs. 2015Non-Hispanic White Kids Are More than Half of Kids’ PopulationTable 7-6: Population of 2- to 12-Year-Olds by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2008 (inthousands)Table 7-7: Change in Population of Kids Under the Age of 14, by Race and Hispanic Origin,2010 vs. 2015 (in thousands)The Obesity EpidemicThe Prevalence of Obesity Among Today’s KidsFigure 7-1: Prevalence of Overweight Children, Ages 6 to 11, by gender, 1963-2004Something Had to Be DoneSources of Empty CaloriesBehaviors Differences in Homes With and Without Overweight Kids
    • Healthy-Weight Homes Shop Certain Channels Less FrequentlyWhat’s in the Fridge and on the TableUnderstanding Parents’ Knowledge of NutritionParents Rank Other Behaviors Above Attention to CaloriesTop Messages that Parents Say Would Change Their BehaviorUse Characters on Nutrient-Rich Foods…Not JunkWhat Kids WantWhat Motivates Kids When It Comes to FoodKids Want Fun Ingredients Added to Their FoodsHow Appearance Appeals to KidsGender Preferences with GraphicsAnd When It Comes to Breakfast Cereal…According to Their ParentsKids Are Eating More Fruits and VeggiesFoodservice Produce TrendsParents Will Choose Natural for Their KidsOrganic Reigns with Parents, TooKey FindingsA Natural Choice: 100% Fruit JuiceNot Natural, But OK for Some Parents: No-Calorie SweetenersWhat Parents Will Buy For Their KidsTable 7-8: Percent of Adults Who Purchased Select Kids’ Foods, Fall 2010The Impact of the Recession on Kids’ Food PurchasesTable 7-9: How the Recession Has Impacted Purchases, Fall 2010Where Parents Will Shop For Kids’ FoodsTable 7-10: Percent of Adults Who Shop Select Retail Channels for Kids’ Foods, Fall 2010Parents’ Opinions of Kids’ FoodsTable 7-11: Parents’ Opinions of Kids’ Foods, Fall 2010Simmons Consumer SurveyWhat the Numbers SayShopping AttitudesTable 7-12: Attitudes on Shopping with Kids, by percent, 2006-2010Are Kids’ Foods Really Kids’ Foods?
    • Frozen FoodsTable 7-13: Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Frozen Foods, 2010Grain-Based ProductsTable 7-14: Percent of U.S. Households Using Select Grain-Based Products, 2010YogurtTable 7-15: Percent of U.S. Households Using Yogurt Products, 2010Chapter 8: New Products and TrendsKey PointsKids: A Product Development OpportunityUnique Nutritional Needs Drive InnovationKids’ Foods and Beverages Are BoomingTable 8-1: Total Number of Product Lines and SKUs Introduced to the U.S. MarketplaceTargeted to Kids, 2005-2010Products Sport Many Tags and ClaimsSingle-Serving Is the Leading ClaimA Note on Natural and OrganicTable 8-2: Total Number of Product Lines Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace Targeted toKids, by Tag or Claim on Packages, 2005-2010Table 8-3: Top-10 Tags or Claims on U.S. Foods and Beverages Targeted to Kids, 2005-2010Ingredients to NoteThe Rice Krispies FiascoIn-Demand Nutrients for Growing ChildrenFortification and Formulation ChallengesFormulating Healthier Kids’ BeveragesOpportunities to Improve HydrationMilk as a Beverage BaseDairy Ingredients Have Many ApplicationsSchool Milk ReformulatingWatch out Apple, Kids Get the BeetMoms Say Make Produce More AppealingNew Product IntroductionsFrom Breakfast to Late-Night Snack
    • Powerhouse PlayersPerdue Rolls Out Whole Grain Chicken NuggetsLunchables Get a MakeoverFigure 8-1: Lunchables—Chicken StripsKraft Is Committed to ImprovementCampbell Soup Reduces SodiumGeneral Mills Give 25% of Its Products a Nutrition MakeoverSome Large Marketers Recognize Opportunity in Kids-Only MarketJimmy Dean Cooks Up Kids’ Breakfast LineDisney and Beech-Nut Roll Out Winnie the Pooh FoodsFigure 8-2: Beech-Nut DisneyGreek Yogurt Maker Goes After Kids’ MarketFigure 8-3: Chobani ChampionsComplete Yogurt MealsFigure 8-4: YoBaby 3 in 1 MealsOutrageous Pudding Formulated for KidsFigure 8-5: Cowrageous PuddingKids’ Belly’s Best FriendFigure 8-6: GoodBelly KidsHain Celestial Is an Innovation Leader with Kids’ FoodsSmaller Players’ Innovations Typically Target Kids OnlyFirst Functional Kids’ Bottled Water Now Available in SchoolsPower Milks Formulated for Kids’ NeedsFigure 8-7: Mega Moo MilkSnack SolutionsCrazy CondimentMeals for the Family, Munchies for the Kids
    • Veggies Patties for Little PittersPeace of Mind with Peas of MindFigure 8-8: Peas of MindPrivate Label ThrivesFresh & Easy Gets Good for KidsFigure 8-9: fresh&easy GoodnessTrends in School Foodservice ProgramsThe Food Channel Makes Observations, TooOther Noteworthy Roll OutsTable 8-4: New Kids’ Foods in the U.S. Marketplace, 2009-2010Figure 8-10: Wicked SourFigure 8-11: Gia Russa KidsFigure 8-12: GoodHeart Steamable Kid’s MealsFigure 8-13: Bake with Me!Figure 8-14: DeBoles Kids Only PastaFigure 8-15: Jolie RavioliFigure 8-16: Kids Organic Frozen MealsFigure 8-17: Eating Right Kids CerealAbout Us:ReportsnReports is an online library of over 100,000+ market research reports and in-depthmarket research studies & analysis of over 5000 micro markets. We provide 24/7 online andoffline support to our customers. Get in touch with us for your needs of market researchreports.Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/marketsreportsOur Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/ReportsnReports/191441427571689Contact:Mr. Priyank7557 Rambler road,Suite727,Dallas,TX75231Tel: + 1 888 391 5441E-mail: sales@reportsandreports.comhttp://www.reportsnreports.comVisit our Market Research Blog