Mind mapping 2012

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  • A mind map starts in the middle with the central idea, asillustrated by this supernova. It’s an expression of radian thought.
  • What is a mind map?Mind mapping is a thinking tool that reflects what goes on in your head. It’s a graphic technique that generates and organizes ideas using associations through a graphical representation. illustrates ideas/concepts and their connections. Mind Mapping was developed by Tony Buzan in the 1970s. He has a company and software called iMindMap and he’s even trademarked the phrase ‘mind maps’. -Central idea-Branches (curvilinear not straight) are reflections of how the brain thinks (imagination & association)-Have one word per branch as it allows more freedom & creative-We use colourto stimulate both sides of the brain (it tends to be processed by the right side of the brain); it helps differentiate themes; more engagingWeuse images/symbols-a pic is worth a thousand words-teaching tool
  • Einstein once said something to the effect of, “you cannot solve problems by thinking within the same framework or mindset that discovered the problems.” The implication is that you need to step into another mindset, another level of thinking. So how do we step into another mindset, as Einstein implies we should? One possible method is mind-mapping, which arguably triggers a much more natural way of thinking and problem solving.The literature reports that ‘geniuses’ think and often work using mind mapping, as they use Flexibility in their thinking. A Creative Genius is flexible in thought, opinion and in the decisions they make on a daily basis. Flexibility naturally encourages “outside the box” thinking which expands possibilities and opportunities.Possibility Thinker: A Creative Genius persistently thinks about the possibilities that are available to them at any one moment in time. They fully understand that focusing on “possibilities” will expand opportunities, conversely, paying attention to “limitations” will only attract a greater array of problems into their lives.Risk Taker: A Creative Genius fully understands that without “risk” there can be no worthwhile rewards. They therefore take risks by thinking differently, by taking chances, and by utilizing creative techniques and strategies in a unique, untried and unorthadox manner.Focused: A Creative Genius is fully focused and locked mentally on the goals they seek to achieve. They dare not break this lock until the moment their objectives are fully realized within their physical reality.Imaginative: A Creative Genius utilizes the full capacity of their imagination to bend the laws of reality to find the answers and opportunities they need to overcome the challenges in their life.Dedicated: A Creative Genius is fully committed and dedicated to the outcomes and objectives they seek to achieve. They simply will not allow distractions or circumstances to push them off course. If however they do get sidetracked, than they are quick to adjust their sails to the changing winds and alter their course accordingly.Patient: A Creative Genius realizes that creativity is a process that involves patience and careful preparation. They don’t try to force answers, instead they proactively make slight adjustments in their approach to open up new perspectives and understandings that will unlock the solutions and opportunities they have been searching for.Proactive: A Creative Genius is constantly moving forward towards their objectives. This doesn’t mean being “action oriented” 24/7. However, it does mean focusing your body and mind on tasks and activities that keep you moving forward towards your goals consistently every single day. They always ask themselves “Is this activity taking me closer to my goals, or is it pulling me away?” The answer redirects their thinking and actions towards their creative objectives.Courageous: A Creative Genius is courageous in action and thought. They are always willing to try new things and break the rules and boundaries limiting the average mind. And it is for this reason that the impossible becomes possible within their perspective of reality.Independent: A Creative Genius is an independent thinker and doer. Yes, they seek other perspectives, ideas and opinions, however in the end, it is their independence that allows for the flow of unique, insightful and creative ideas.Intuitive: A Creative Genius is a very intuitive soul. They fully understand that some answers can only be realized when they have an intuitive understanding of the world and the problem they are facing.Persistent: A Creative Genius is fully aware if they persistent long enough over a consistent period of time, that every problem can be solved in a surprising and creative way. For this reason they bring forth a resilient attitude to every challenge confronting their reality.Curious & Playful Nature: A Creative Genius approaches every task or activity in a curiously playful manner. Reminiscent of a child learning something new for the very first time. A Creative Genius fully appreciates that only curiosity and playfulness is able to relax their mind and bring forth its fullest creative potential.mind maps offer a hybrid textual/ visual method of brainstorming or simply recording thoughts, mind mapping used properly is usually far more effective for breaking through a creative block than, say, making a linear list.Apologies to the neuroscientists here. Mind maps are used to generate, visualize, structure, and classify ideas, and as an aid to studying and organizing information, solving problems, making decisions, and writing.The elements of a given mind map are arranged intuitively according to the importance of the concepts, and are classified into groupings, branches, or areas, with the goal of representing semantic or other connections between portions of information.Right hemisphere provides us with spatial perception, colour, dimension and more. Left hemisphere provides us with logic, linear reasoning, words, lists, analysis and more.Our brain manages all information output whether it be thoughts, images, memories, music, or sensations. The brain processes information in different ways from lists, codes (mneumonics), numbers, sequences, colours, images, etc. Buzan says that all bits of information we receive can be represented as a central sphere with branches that represent related concepts, each of which has its own network of links/connections.Mind maps use visualization, association, making things outstanding, imagination, colour, rhythm, and holism which increases our ability to rememberMind mapping is widely accepted by people who are primarily right brained (creative people). Many geniuses (Leonardo (falling to right side), Einstein (falling to left side)) are ambidextrous, using both sides of their brains equally.Note taking (listening) doesn’t let key ideas stand out as all look the same (colour, letters). No obvious relations between items.A picture says How to mind mapThink in terms of keywords or symbols that represent ideas and wordsHave a central concept/idea/task…Use single wordsConnecting lines must be curvilinear (Buzan says that straight lines are limiting and rigid)Mind maps are used to generate, visualize, structure and classify ideas-are study aids-good for brainstorming (put problem/issue in centre)-create a process diagram-clarifies ideas-organizing aide-improves memory-increases reasoning ability-preparing presentations-outlinesMind maps help us use our mind more effectivlyCan use paperOr post-it notesOr software (free and paid)
  • Mind mapping uses the full range of cortical skills – word, image, number, logic, rhythm, colour and spatial awareness in a uniquely powerful technique
  • Einstein once said something to the effect of, “you cannot solve problems by thinking within the same framework or mindset that discovered the problems.” The implication is that you need to step into another mindset, another level of thinking. So how do we step into another mindset, as Einstein implies we should? One possible method is mind-mapping, which arguably triggers a much more natural way of thinking and problem solving.The literature reports that ‘geniuses’ think and often work using mind mapping, as they use Flexibility in their thinking. A Creative Genius is flexible in thought, opinion and in the decisions they make on a daily basis. Flexibility naturally encourages “outside the box” thinking which expands possibilities and opportunities.Possibility Thinker: A Creative Genius persistently thinks about the possibilities that are available to them at any one moment in time. They fully understand that focusing on “possibilities” will expand opportunities, conversely, paying attention to “limitations” will only attract a greater array of problems into their lives.Risk Taker: A Creative Genius fully understands that without “risk” there can be no worthwhile rewards. They therefore take risks by thinking differently, by taking chances, and by utilizing creative techniques and strategies in a unique, untried and unorthadox manner.Focused: A Creative Genius is fully focused and locked mentally on the goals they seek to achieve. They dare not break this lock until the moment their objectives are fully realized within their physical reality.Imaginative: A Creative Genius utilizes the full capacity of their imagination to bend the laws of reality to find the answers and opportunities they need to overcome the challenges in their life.Dedicated: A Creative Genius is fully committed and dedicated to the outcomes and objectives they seek to achieve. They simply will not allow distractions or circumstances to push them off course. If however they do get sidetracked, than they are quick to adjust their sails to the changing winds and alter their course accordingly.Patient: A Creative Genius realizes that creativity is a process that involves patience and careful preparation. They don’t try to force answers, instead they proactively make slight adjustments in their approach to open up new perspectives and understandings that will unlock the solutions and opportunities they have been searching for.Proactive: A Creative Genius is constantly moving forward towards their objectives. This doesn’t mean being “action oriented” 24/7. However, it does mean focusing your body and mind on tasks and activities that keep you moving forward towards your goals consistently every single day. They always ask themselves “Is this activity taking me closer to my goals, or is it pulling me away?” The answer redirects their thinking and actions towards their creative objectives.Courageous: A Creative Genius is courageous in action and thought. They are always willing to try new things and break the rules and boundaries limiting the average mind. And it is for this reason that the impossible becomes possible within their perspective of reality.Independent: A Creative Genius is an independent thinker and doer. Yes, they seek other perspectives, ideas and opinions, however in the end, it is their independence that allows for the flow of unique, insightful and creative ideas.Intuitive: A Creative Genius is a very intuitive soul. They fully understand that some answers can only be realized when they have an intuitive understanding of the world and the problem they are facing.Persistent: A Creative Genius is fully aware if they persistent long enough over a consistent period of time, that every problem can be solved in a surprising and creative way. For this reason they bring forth a resilient attitude to every challenge confronting their reality.Curious & Playful Nature: A Creative Genius approaches every task or activity in a curiously playful manner. Reminiscent of a child learning something new for the very first time. A Creative Genius fully appreciates that only curiosity and playfulness is able to relax their mind and bring forth its fullest creative potential.OBSCURE MANUSCRIPTSIn spite of their advanced nature (or due to it), Leonardo’s mechanical achievements did not contribute to the developmentof science and technology and did not influence technological progress in the early phase of modern history.His drawings were either obscure to his contemporaries and their offspring or totally unknown and remained so for300 years. But in the 19th century, engineers were able to appreciate Leonardo’s grasp of the mechanical.More than 5,000 pages of his manuscripts are still available today. Apart from some superficial mentions ofLeonardo and his works in some almanacs in the 16th century, these drawings are the only sources of his scientificresearch that have survived as far as we know.Leonardo did not publish or otherwise distribute the contents of his notebooks. He did not wish for anybody tosee or use his manuscripts. Apart from some drawings he produced for presentation to potential clients, his noteswere intended for internal use, as some sort of mind maps. He even took up the habit of laying down the (often justfragmentary) textual explanations next to the actual drawings in mirror writing. In other words, he wrote from rightto left so the finished text was the mirror image of normal writing, as shown in the illustration; he did so presumablyin order to prevent possible business rivals from stealing his ideas.
  • Another page from a Leonardo notebook
  • This is the first-known sketch by Charles Darwin of an evolutionary tree describing the relationships among groups of organisms. This drawing, with the most ancient forms at the bottom and their descendants branching off irregularly along the trunk, reveals that Darwin understood all plants and animals are related. Above his tree Darwin wrote firmly, "I think." The original lives at Cambridge University Library
  • Isaac Newton’s sketch for a reflecting telescope and its component parts
  • Demo various egs. That are listed at the link, above.Mention Univ of Dundee uses mind maps in curriculum yrs 1, 2, 3 This website uses concept maps and mind maps to represent each human disease as one unit. The maps present a large zoomed-out picture for each disease and aims to make connections between all aspects of the disease. Medication comparisions described as "comprehensive" are attached to the maps. This collection of medical mind maps is sourced from the Zoom out - Pharmacotherapy website and are here acknowledged as the work of MahaAtef, a Clinical Pharmacist and a Healthcare Quality Specialist, who graciously uploaded them for WikIT readers to use.
  • Where are mind maps used: in companiesOne day, Jean-LucKastner, a Senior manager in hewlettpackard medical products group, europe, (note Buzan’s book was published in 1993) was informed that one of his staff was ill and would be off work for 2 months. His company manufactured a computer system that was able to monitor and analyze rhythms of the heart, detecting malfunctions early enough to alert the attending physician in order to take proper corrective actions. Kastner, as ‘the boss’ and the only person with enough background info to consider running the “cardiac arrythmia training” course had to oblige to fill in for the sick employee. This required his organizing and supplementing his existing knowledge to teach the 4 day course. The course was intended to provide HP application support engineers with in-depth knowledge of: human heart physiology; main rhythm problems and their consequences; computer algorithm works; arrhythmia system operation & how to train end users (nurses and doctors) and explain some of the features that might lead the device into difficult situations.Results: students judged the mind mapping training session as more successful and useful than the old slide-based course; students got higher marks in the 2 hour final exam and the recall 1 month later was significantly higher than the students who learned via slide-based training.Benefits of mind maps for management:-Improved communication-efficient and effective training-happier employees
  • Anothereg. of teachingBenefits:-They automatically inspire interest in students-they make lessons more spontaneous, creative and enjoyable for both class and instructor-flexible and adaptable to change and development in your teaching notes-students tend to get better marks in exams because only relevant material is shown in a clear and memorable form-unlike linear text mind maps show not just facts but relationships between these facts leading to a deeper understanding of the subject-reduces use of paper (only one page for student handout and lecturer notes)
  • Eg. ornithology
  • Eg. using a mind map for patient care planningSomenurses have found that mind mapping is effective when planning patient care. The mind map helps determine a client’s care needs by helping visualize the linkages between various client symptoms, interventions, or problems as they impact each other. The technique helps create a holistic view of a client, strengthens critical thinking skills and facilitates the creative process of planning client care. (p.19 of Doenges ME et al. Nurse’s pocket guide: diagnoses, prioritized interventions, and rationales. 12th ed. 2010. p.63).
  • The most effective Mind Maps also contain lots of images and different colours, as these help the brain to remember. Mind Maps have many uses. They can be used to write notes in order to revise for exams, brainstorm for ideas, organise large amounts of information etcMind Maps start with a main idea in the centre of the page. This then has branches coming off it for the most important headings. Each of these headings then has further branches coming off it, so that the information in the Mind Map radiates from the centre outwards. This more closely matches the brain's way of arranging information, and is more effective than linear notes from top to bottom.How to mind mapThink in terms of keywords or symbols that represent ideas and wordsHave a central concept/idea/task…Use single wordsConnecting lines must be curvilinear (Buzan says that straight lines are limiting and rigid)Mind maps are used to generate, visualize, structure and classify ideas-are study aids-good for brainstorming (put problem/issue in centre)-create a process diagram-clarifies ideas-organizing aide-improves memory-increases reasoning ability-preparing presentations-outlinesMind maps help us use our mind more effectivlyCan use paperOr post-it notesWhile pen and paper-based mindmaps are helpful, there are many benefits to using mind mapping software. For example, the ability to expand and collapse map nodes in a digital mind map means that you can rapidly switch between a detailed view (above) or a high-level view (below).Or software (free and paid)
  • Are used in meetings for brainstorming, problem solving, rational analysis, and decision markingBenefits:-they ensure that every member understands the viewpoints of other members in the group-they place all contributions in context-including all individual contributions on the mind map increases energy, enthusiasm and cooperation within the group-every member has a complete record of the meeting, thus ensuring that everyone understands and remembers exactly what has been decided-very time efficient-they increase the probability of stated goals being reached
  • Disadvantages of using linear notes when preparing talks and presentations:-loss of eye contact when speaker keeps referring to notes. Seems more spontaneous to audience, gives freedom and flexibility as well as order and precision -easier to make physical gestures when referring to the mind map-
  • This one illustrates a presentation that is introducing the brain, memory, & mind mapping
  • This is a Mind Map of a lecture by Professor Susan Greenfield, the eminent neuroscientist.
  • A guide to golf improvement
  • Eg for project management
  • Flowchart – a schematic representation of a process that has a start and finishing point. It represents a series of steps that lead to a certain objective or goal.A mind map is a diagram representing ideas and concepts that are arranged around a central image/ideaIt’s used to structure, classify, visualize and at times, generate ideas for the purpose of organizing info, solving problems and making better decisions. A mind map essentially pieces together a subject into effective setments/chunks to help aid memory and recallThe concept map is a graphic tool for organising and representing knowledge. It was developed by Novak and Gowin in 1984 and is based on Ausubel’s assimilation theory of learning (1962). Ausubel is a cognitive psychologist. A key concept in Assimilation Learning Theory is that new knowledge will mean something to a learner and will be rememberedwhen it is connected to existing knowledge – what is already known!A concept map is a diagram that shows the relationship amongst more than one concept using connector words and arrows. It is used as a tool to help unlock connections and associations between different thoughts and ideas. A key concept in Assimilation Learning Theory is that new knowledge will mean something to a learner and will be rememberedwhen it is connected to existing knowledge – what is already known! Ausubel compares meaningful learning to rote learning.
  • Demo this: http://www.curehunter.com/public/dictionary.do and show them how this moves into a more complicated mind map online.
  • ICU Mind Maps: Over 300 mind maps were developed by Wellington ICU's Dr. Paul Young as a study aid for the Fellowship of the College of Intensive Care Medicine Fellowship exam in 2007-08. They are provided free online and may be redistributed for educational purposes.They have since gone on to be used by Wellington trainees studying for the part II exam. The are free.
  • Another of Dr. Paul Young’s mind maps
  • Learners must have relevant background informationMaterial to be learned must be conceptually clear and presented with language and egs. That will relate to learner’s prior knowledge-learner must make the choice to learn meaningfully. Students must be motivated to incorporate new meanings into their prior knowledge, rather than just memorizing concept definitions. The creation of concept maps supports the incorporation of new meanings into prior knowledge.Concepts are usually enclosed in circles/boxes and relationships between them are represented by straight lines. Words on the linking lines explain the relationship between the concepts-concepts are represented in a hierarchical fashion with the most general concepts at the top of the map and the more specific below-the inclusion of cross links makes explicit relationships between concepts in different domains within the concept map. Cross links show how a concept in one domain of knowledge shown on the map is related to a concept in another domain on the mapLearners, as they struggle to create good concept maps, are engaged in a creative process that can be challenging to many, especially to learners who have spent much of their life learning by rote. Rote learning adds very little to our knowledge structures, and therefore is not conducive to creative thinking or advanced problem solving. Consequently, concept mapping is an excellent tool to promote of creative thinking and identification of new problem-solving methods. Another very powerful use of Concept Maps is as an evaluation tool. An effective program for online concept map creation is (http://cmap.ihmc.us/).
  • The study found that concept mapping assessment can be reliably administered in medical education but suggests that training and practice are required to perform the assessment task.
  • Flow Chart
  • Algorithms and clinicalMedical algorithms are part of a broader field which is usually fit under the aims of medical informatics and medical decision making. Medical decisions occur in several areas of medical activity including medical test selection, diagnosis, therapy and prognosis, and automatic control of medical equipment.In relation to logic-based and artificial neural network-based clinical decision support system, which are also computer applications to the medical decision making field, algorithms are less complex in architecture, data structure and user interface. Medical algorithms are not necessarily implemented using digital computers. In fact, many of them can be represented on paper, in the form of diagrams, nomographs, etc.
  • Scarecrow wants to get a brainWizard of Oz, 1939 film
  • Mind mapping 2012

    1. 1. Mind mappingRebecca RaworthIMP Lunch ‘n LearnFebruary 13, 2012
    2. 2. star_supernova_6-bbcimage.jpg from the website theangstguy.com
    3. 3. http://blog.iqmatrix.com/mind-map/how-to-mind-map-a-beginners-guide
    4. 4. http://lifehacker.com/5867049/nine-stubborn-brain-myths- http://www.rightbrainpeople.com/?p=whyrightbrain_rightvsleftthat-just-wont-die-debunked-by-science
    5. 5. Constructivist theory of learning. Theoretical assumptions that underlie constructivist theory using a bottom-up approach. Academic information iscommonly available to the learner through reading, visualizing, or listening. Irrespective of the mechanism, information enters the mind of thelearner, who is actively trying to make sense of the information. Adapted from Ausubel [7].DAntoni et al. BMC Medical Education 2010 10:61 doi:10.1186/1472-6920-10-61
    6. 6. Puzzle Writing Using Pictograms, c. 1487-1490 Pen and ink, 300 x 253 mm Windsor Castle, Royal Library (RL 12692r and RL 12692v Humor was not absent from Leonardos work. This clearly emerges from a sheet of pictograms (a section of which is represented on our page) in which Leonardo experiments with the translation of short phrases into images, usually by giving each word a different meaning and then illustrating it in a picture. On the verso of the sheet, for example, in pictographs running from right to left on top of the square drawn just to the left of center, he illustrates the laconic expression "ora sono fritto", literally meaning "Now Im fried!" (i.e. done for) as follows: the Italian word ora ("now") also means "hour" and is represented by an hourglass; sono ("I am") also means "sound" (strictly speaking suono) and is indicated by someone playing a pipe; lastly, the word "fritto ("fried") has been illustrated with a frying pan on fire.http://www.insource.com/about.davinci.asp
    7. 7. mindmaptutor.com
    8. 8. Leonardos Mysterious Handwriting Leonardos habit of using mirror-writing in his notebooks and manuscripts, in other words, of writing from right to left, for centuries cast a particular air of secrecy over his legacy. He was regularly suspected of having deliberately veiled his writings so as to prevent unauthorized access to his ideas and inventions. While the sense of mystery with which this surrounded his work may have served to heighten its fascination, Leonardos reasons for choosing mirror-writing seem to have been chiefly practical in nature. He was left-handed and if he wrote in the normal fashion from left to right he risked smudging the wet ink with his hand. Leonardo evidently made no secret of his reversed method of writing since the early sources (e.g. Vasari) regularly mention that his notes are best read with a mirror.http://www.insource.com/about.davinci.asp
    9. 9. Charles Darwin. Evolution sketch from Notebook B. 1837. Copied from http://darwinaia.wordpress.com/.
    10. 10. http://www.templeton-cambridge.org/fellows/showarticle.php?article=114
    11. 11. The 10 Commandments of Steve Photo: Axel Schmidt / AFP-GettyImages From:http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2011/08/28/steve-jobs-his-10-commandments.html
    12. 12. Uses in medicine• For students to use as learning tools• For assessment• For teaching• In examinations• For preparing/reviewing teaching sessions
    13. 13. Training/Education/LearningBuzan T. The Mind Map Book. BBC Books. Revised ed. 1995.
    14. 14. TeachingBuzan T. The Mind Map Book. BBC Books. Revised ed. 1995.
    15. 15. LearningBuzan T. The Mind Map Book. BBC Books. Revised ed. 1995.
    16. 16. Planning patient care using a mind mapDoenges ME et al. Nurse’s pocket guide: diagnoses, prioritized interventions, and rationales. 12th ed. 2010. p.63
    17. 17. How to Mind Map in Seven Steps... From: usingmindmaps.com
    18. 18. Med Teach. 2002 Jan;24(1):90-9. An analysis, using concept mapping, of diabetic patients knowledge, before and after patient education. Marchand C, DIvernois JF, Assal JP,Slama G, Hivon R.
    19. 19. Meetings/Brainstorminghttp://www.edrawsoft.com/Brainstorming.php
    20. 20. Presentationshttp://www.mind-mapping.co.uk/mind-maps-examples.htm
    21. 21. Another presentation example
    22. 22. Lecturehttp://www.mind-mapping.co.uk/mind-maps-examples.htm
    23. 23. Personal/Lifestylehttp://www.mind-mapping.co.uk/mind-maps-examples.htm
    24. 24. Managementhttp://www.innovationgear.com/mind-mapping-software/solutions/project-planning-and-project-management.php
    25. 25. Concept mapping
    26. 26. http://www.curehunter.com/public/dictionary.do
    27. 27. Study Aidhttp://lifeinthefastlane.com/exams/cicm-fellowship/icu-mind-maps/
    28. 28. http://lifeinthefastlane.com/exams/cicm-fellowship/icu-mind-maps/
    29. 29. Novak JD, Canas AJ. http://icoword-library.ophthalmologyblogs.org/2010/09/30/the-theory-underlying-concept-maps-and-how-to-construct-and-use-them/
    30. 30. Concept mapshttp://cmapspublic3.ihmc.us/rid=1040063175687_923424611_4117/Menstrual_Cycle_all_10_28.cmap (Amer Coll Women’sHealth Physicians’ concept map of the menstrual cycle, using Institute for Human & Machine Cognition on-line software.
    31. 31. Measuring Knowledge Structure: Reliability of Concept Mapping Assessment in Medical Education. Srinivasan, Malathi; McElvany, Matthew; MD, MAS; Shay, Jane; MD, MS; Shavelson, Richard; West, Daniel Academic Medicine. 83(12):1196- 1203, December 2008. DOI: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31818c6e84Figure 1 Excerpts from high- and low-scoring concept maps about diabetes. In2004, fourth-year medical students andsenior residents in medicine and pediatricsat University of California-Davis School ofMedicine created concept maps, whichwere rated using four different scoringsystems. The low-scoring map shows lineararrangements of concepts, with lesscomplex relationship descriptions and nolinks noted between hierarchies. The high-scoring map (left) shows more complexnested hierarchies, with betterexplanations of relationships. Severalhierarchies originating from "diabetes" areshown, to show learners links betweenconcepts.
    32. 32. http://cmapspublic2.ihmc.us/rid=1HY6KFJ5P-HZ9T44-NGX/hHS%20%20Concept%20Map%202.cmap
    33. 33. http://sanodox.blogspot.com/2010/04/this-flow-chart-is-obviously-made-by.html
    34. 34. Algorithm 1: Detection and diagnosis of hypertensionhttp://www.bcguidelines.ca/guideline_hypertension.html#algorithm1
    35. 35. Thinkinghttp://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/collections/sculptures/thinker . The Thinker. Auguste Rodin. 1903.
    36. 36. Wizard of Oz (1930). If I only had a brain…. From the Internet Movie Database Questions?

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