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The audience for this presentation is K-12 teachers. The focus is English learners, but could be applied to any learners that are digitally excluded. The bottom line of the message is "Media should …

The audience for this presentation is K-12 teachers. The focus is English learners, but could be applied to any learners that are digitally excluded. The bottom line of the message is "Media should not compete with literacy."

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  • This presentation will focus on a larger picture to understand the world for which we are preparing our students.
    Give credit to Digital Access.org
    Sergio Amadeu de Silva is the head of the National Institute of Information Technology (ITI) and father of the Telecentros.
  • Digital Divide Around the World:
    The categories included in Digital Access Index are: Infrastructure (number of fixed and mobile subscribers), Affordability (internet access price as percentage of the Gross National Income per capita), Knowledge (adult literacy and school enrolment level), Quality (international bandwidth per capita and broadband subscribers) and Usage (internet users).
    Top 10 Countries are:
    Sweden
    Denmark
    Iceland
    South Korea
    Norway
    Netherlands
    Hong Kong
    Finland
    Taiwan
    Canada
    Bottom Five:
    Guinea Bisseau
    Chad
    Mali
    Burkina Faso
    Niger
  • A Nation Online?
    Spanish-speaking Latinos have strikingly low rates of computer ownership and home Internet use.
    60% of all workers used a computer at work – which means their jobs required computer literacy. It also means that those individuals found a job, an activity which, in itself, increasingly requires Internet access and savvy.
  • Content Barriers Cited by Low-Income Adults
  • it's never been cheaper to get onto the Net than today. People need to get their heads on straight about this.
    While that might be true, there might be deeper causes around the divide than simply cost.
    Prensky’s words: Digital natives, digital immigrants
    Julian: Mom, can you make some blueberry muffins?
    Mom: Julian, I don’t’ have a recipe to make blueberry muffins.
    Julian (age 5): You can google it.
  • Why did poetry, drama, philosophy, mathematics, and science develop so quickly and powerfully in Ancient Greece?
    Most scholars attribute these developments to the Greeks' creation of a phonetic alphabet.
  • ICT = information and communication technology
    Media is a misnomer
  • “Armed with pocket-sized video cameras, a tenacious band of Burmese reporters face down death to expose the repressive regime controlling their country. In 2007, after decades of self-imposed silence, Burma became headline news across the globe when peaceful Buddhist monks led a massive rebellion. More than 100,000 people took to the streets protesting a cruel dictatorship that has held the country hostage for more than 40 years. Foreign news crews were banned, the Internet was shut down, and Burma was closed to the outside world. So how did we witness these events? Enter the Democratic Voice of Burma (DVB), aka the Burma VJs. Compiled from the shaky handheld footage of the DVB, acclaimed filmmaker Anders Ostergaard’s Burma VJ pulls us into the heat of the moment as the VJs themselves become the target of the Burmese government. Their tactical leader, code-named Joshua, oversees operations from a safe hiding place in Thailand. Via clandestine phone calls, Joshua dispenses his posse of video warriors, who covertly film the abuses in their country, then smuggle their footage across the border into Thailand. Joshua ships the footage to Norway, where it is broadcast back to Burma and the world via satellite. Burma VJ plays like a thriller, all the more scary because it is true.”
  • “Media” should not compete with literacy, it adds layers
  • The International Society for Technology in Education
  • This is a model of learning powered by Technology. In contrast to traditional classroom instruction, which often consists of a single educator transmitting the same information to all learners in the same way, the model puts students at the center and empowers them to take control of their own learning by providing flexibility on several dimensions. A core set of standards-based concepts and competencies form the basis of what all students should learn, but beyond that students and educators have options for engaging learning: large groups, small groups, and activities to individual goals, needs, and interests.
  • Transcript

    • 1. 1 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 2. English learners in the digital age:English learners in the digital age: natives, immigrants, or outsiders?natives, immigrants, or outsiders? Ruslana Westerlund, Ed.D. (Cand.) Collaboration Convention and unConference, November 11-12, 2010 2 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 3. Questions to be addressed:Questions to be addressed: If our students are tomorrow’s world citizens, are we serving as agents of change to close not only the achievement gap, but also the digital gap that exists among our students? Do we view technology literacy as literacy worthy of our pursuit? Do we have a sense of urgency to prepare our students to be engaged digital citizens or do we still believe that media competes with literacy? What are the costs of the digital exclusion to our schools, communities, and the world? 4 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 4. Social Inclusion & DemocracySocial Inclusion & Democracy ““To communicate in the post-modernTo communicate in the post-modern society is the power to interact withsociety is the power to interact with networks of information. It is not sufficientnetworks of information. It is not sufficient to have a free mind, if our words cannotto have a free mind, if our words cannot circulate like the words of others.”circulate like the words of others.”    Sergio Amadeu de SilvaSergio Amadeu de Silva The National Institute of Information Technology,The National Institute of Information Technology, San Paulo BrazilSan Paulo Brazil 5 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 5. 6 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 6. Digital Divide in the U.S.Digital Divide in the U.S. The digital divide occurs along racial and ethnic lines, where income, language, social networks, and education influencin technology access and literacy (2005 data): 77% of white children have Internet access at home, compared to 40% of black and Latino children. 86% of white children have a home computer, while only half of black and Latino children do. American Indians have lower rates of computer ownership and Internet access than whites. 7 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 7. Offline in AmericaOffline in America source: U.S. Department of Commerce, A Nation Online, 2004source: U.S. Department of Commerce, A Nation Online, 2004 8 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 8. ““Don’t need it, not interested in it.”Don’t need it, not interested in it.” 18% of those not online answered: ◦ “I’m not interested in anything on the Internet.” This exceeds the 12% who said they either weren’t sure who to use the Internet or couldn’t afford a computer.1 A Children’s Partnership report on online content reveals “not interested” means “content/information is not designed for me, or my family or my community”.2 1.Pew Internet and American Life Study, 2005 2. Wendy Lazarus and Francisco Mora “Online Content for Low-Income and Underserved Americans: The Digital Divide's New Frontier” 9 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 9. CONTENT, NOT ACCESS BARRIERS AND SOLUTIONSCONTENT, NOT ACCESS BARRIERS AND SOLUTIONS 10 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 10. e lingua franca?e lingua franca?  70% of website pages70% of website pages are in Englishare in English 70% of the worlds70% of the worlds population doesn’t speakpopulation doesn’t speak English as their primaryEnglish as their primary languagelanguage  2000 U.S. census:2000 U.S. census: 18% of residents report18% of residents report English is not theEnglish is not the primary language spokenprimary language spoken at homeat home 11 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 11. Deeper Causes for THE Digital Divide a generational issue a cultural issue an educational issue: do you have the basic training to use it?I’m hungry. If we had a computer, we would have been able to order it on the computer Julian: Mom, can you make some blueberry muffins? Mom: Julian, I don’t have a recipe to make blueberry muffins. Julian (age 5): You can google it. 12 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 12. Left brain, right brain, new brainLeft brain, right brain, new brain The Internet is nothing less than the equivalent of a the development of phonetic alphabet in ancient Greece. Students are acquiring new desirable skills: ◦ Networking ◦ Associative Logic ◦ Graphic Literacy ◦ Information Space ◦ Multi-tasking 13 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 13. Power of ICTPower of ICT User-driven media is exploding around the globe – this is not a western fad Blogs are being created in places like China and Singapore, where traditional media is restricted Human rights and indigenous democracy movements benefit from instant, international attention 14 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 14. Power of ICTPower of ICT People without a voice in the mainstream media or with limited political representation can use the Internet to become active participants in civil discourse and engage others in campaigns for positive change. Let’s look at some examples 15 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 15. Burma VJ: Reporting from a closedBurma VJ: Reporting from a closed countrycountry 16 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 16. “Students see themselves as change- makers!” Multimedia enhances project-based learning (Edutopia Expeditionary Learning) Students as Critical Consumers of Media
    • 17. reThink Literacy…reThink Literacy… ICT provides new opportunities for knowledge creation, should we expand our (centuries-old) definition and our assumptions of literacy? What is your definition of literacy? Discuss with the people at your table. 18 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 18. Technology Literacy is:Technology Literacy is: The ability to responsibly, creatively, and effectively use appropriate technology to: ◦ Communicate ◦ Access, collect, manage, integrate, and evaluate information ◦ Solve problems and create solutions ◦ Build and share knowledge; and ◦ Improve and enhance learning in all subject areas and experiences. 19 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 19. ISTE’s National EducationalISTE’s National Educational Technology Standards for StudentsTechnology Standards for Students Creativity and Innovation: students should be able to use technology and their existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, processes. Communication and Collaboration: students should be able to work collaboratively, both in person and at a distance, and to communicate ideas effectively to multiple audiences using new media. 20 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 20. ISTE’s National EducationalISTE’s National Educational Technology Standards for StudentsTechnology Standards for Students Research and information fluency: students should be able to use a variety of digital media to locate, organize, analyze, and evaluate information from a variety of sources. Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: students should be able to define problems, plan and conduct research, and identify solutions using digital tools and resources.
    • 21. ISTE’s National EducationalISTE’s National Educational Technology Standards for StudentsTechnology Standards for Students Digital citizenship: students should take responsibility for their own lifelong learning and should practice safe, legal, and ethical use of information and digital tools. Technology operations and concepts: Students should understand technology systems, select and use technology applications effectively, and be able to troubleshoot systems and applications.
    • 22. Are your English learners working toward meeting these standards or are they falling through the net? 23 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 23. Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010 24
    • 24. Learning: Engage and EmpowerLearning: Engage and Empower Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010 25 National Education Technology Plan 2010 released November 2010. US Department of Education. Office of Educational Technology
    • 25. Assessment: Measure What MattersAssessment: Measure What Matters Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010 26 National Education Technology Plan 2010 released November 2010. US Department of Education. Office of Educational Technology
    • 26. Teaching: Prepare and ConnectTeaching: Prepare and Connect Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010 27 National Education Technology Plan 2010 released November 2010. US Department of Education. Office of Educational Technology
    • 27. reThink assumptions… Rethink basic assumptions about ◦ “seat-time” measures of educational attainment created in 1800’s. ◦ Age-determined groups, ◦ Structure separate academic disciplines, ◦ Organize learning into classes of roughly equal size with all the students in a particular class receiving the same content at the same pace, and keep these groups place all year
    • 28. ModelofLearningPoweredbyModelofLearningPoweredby TechnologyTechnology Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010 29 National Education Technology Plan 2010 released November 2010. US Department of Education. Office of Educational
    • 29. School of One
    • 30. Working toward Social InclusionWorking toward Social Inclusion Technology should combat social exclusion, not reinforce it “Access” is not about computers and the Internet – it’s about social inclusion and equity Participation in the global, knowledge- based economy requires the ability to access and manage information 31 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010
    • 31. Closing questions:Closing questions: Define your current reality: Are your English Learners digital natives, immigrants, or outsiders? Vision for the future: Where do you want your students to be? Getting it done: What are the next steps you can take? Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010 32
    • 32. References:References: Cummins, J., Brown, K., Sawyers, D. (2007) Literacy, technology, and diversity. Teaching for success in changing times.  Boston, MA: Allyn Bacon. Transforming American Education: Learning Powered by Technology. National Education Technology Plan 2010 released November 2010. US Department of Education. Office of Educational Technology http://www.ed.gov/sites/default/files/netp2010.pdf Lazarus, W.,& Mora, F. (2005) “Online Content for Low-Income and Underserved Americans: The Digital Divide's New Frontier” 33 Ruslana Westerlund Collaboration Convention 2010