Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION.Introduction:Ethics are the principles or standards...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONCode of ethics for employers       Treat all jobseekers equally       No discriminati...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONRights:Nonutilitarian arguments against racial and sexual discrimination may take the a...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONdiscrimination in employment occurs. Among the practices now widely recognized asdiscri...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONfrom the higher, more senior positions on the advancement ladder. To rectify the situat...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONinterfering with an individual‟s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile ...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONbehaviour is invisible to the observer, finding an objective way of define the capabili...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONWill this person deliver the business results that are needed? Both in output terms and...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONFRAMEWORK OF LEGISLATION AND KEY SET OF VALUES CONCERNEDWITH EMPLOYEMENTFramework Of Le...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONcondition or circumstance and can be modified for similar circumstances. Best Practice ...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION       Specifying the qualities sought from applicants, in addition to specific knowled...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: A MODEL OF ETHICS FOR THE EMPLOYMENTPROCESSEthical Model: Recru...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: THE USE OF PSYCHOMETRIC ASSESSMENTSThe Health Professions Counc...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION                                     ConclusionRecruitment and selection form a vital f...
ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONBY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA                       Page 15
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Ethics in recruitment and selection

55,615

Published on

ethics in recruitment and selection

Published in: Business, Technology
2 Comments
7 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • How foolish this web. we are unable to get copy of this document.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • How can i get hard copy of it?
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
55,615
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
934
Comments
2
Likes
7
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Ethics in recruitment and selection "

  1. 1. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION.Introduction:Ethics are the principles or standards that guide day-to-day business activities in accordancewith established corporate values. Ethical business conduct offers a wide range oforganizational integrity, involving strategy, business goals, policies and activities. Amongethical values are trust, respect, honesty, responsibility and the overall pursuit of perfection.RECRUITMENT: refers to the processes followed by organisations when they wish toattract applicants for vacant or new positions.SELECTION: follows the recruiting process with the appointment of the most suitedapplicant to the position.Ethics in the field of hiring, staffing and recruitment is based on a combination of thingsand depends on who is actually involved in the hiring process.Certainly the job searcher,hiring manager and recruiter are just three possible people involved in a hiring decision.ETHICAL ISSUES IN RECRUITING • Organisations comprise employees who need respect as people. • Streamlining has lead to downsizing or right-sizing of organisations. Those employees who are left behind often mistrust management and feel insecure about their own jobs. Job insecurity can result in stress for the employee which increases the likelihood of mistakes being made or accidents occurring • As organisations become more complex with fewer employees, legislative requirements become crucial to maintain the psychological well-being of employees. • Legislative requirements include: EEO legislation, Affirmative Action legislation, Worker‟s Compensation Acts and Regulations and so on. • Discriminatory recruitment practices may inhibit the success of women or people from minority backgrounds, but also older applicants.BY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 1
  2. 2. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONCode of ethics for employers  Treat all jobseekers equally  No discrimination based on race, origin, religious or political views, gender, age or sexual orientation Do not request Jobseekers to include their photos in the resume  Rely only on relevant and job-related information when making hiring decisionsCode of ethics for jobseekers  Ensure Resume accuracy  Accept and expect employment history verification  Assume personal responsibility for publishing resume, pictures and other.DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYEMENT ON THE BASIS OF UTILITY, RIGHTS, ANDJUSTICE.The arguments mustered against discrimination generally fall into three groups namelyutilitarian, rights, justice.Utility:The standard utilitarian argument against racial and sexual discrimination is based on the ideathat a society‟s productivity will be optimized to the extent that jobs are awarded on the basisof competency. Different jobs, the argument goes, require different skills and personalitytraits if they are to be carried out in as productive manner as possible. Furthermore, differentpeople have different skills and personality traits. Consequently, to ensure that jobs aremaximally productive, they must be assigned o those individuals whose skills and personalitytraits qualify them as the most competent for the job. Insofar as jobs are assigned toindividuals on basis of other criteria unrelated to competency, productivity must necessarilydecline. Discriminating among job applicants on the basis of race, sex, religion, or othercharacteristics unrelated to job performance is necessarily inefficient and, therefore , contraryto utilitarian principles.BY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 2
  3. 3. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONRights:Nonutilitarian arguments against racial and sexual discrimination may take the approach thatdiscrimination is wrong because it violates a person‟s basic moral rights.Kantian theory for example, holds that human beings should be treated as ends and never asmeans. At a minimum, this principle means that each individual has moral right to be treatedas a free person equal to any other person and that all individuals have a correlative moralduty to treat each individual as a free and equal person.Discriminatory practices violate the principle in two ways. First, discrimination is based onthe belief that one group is inferior to the other groups, that blacks, for example, are lesscompetent or worthy of respect than men. Racial and sexual discrimination, for instance, maybe based on stereotypes that see minorities as “lazy or “shitless” and see women as“emotional” and “week” such degrading stereotypes undermine the self esteem of thosegroups against whom stereotypes are directed and thereby violate their right to be treated asequals.Second discrimination places the member of group that are discriminated against in lowersocial and economic position: women and minorities have fewer job opportunities and aregiven lower salaries. Again, the right to be treated as a free job and equal person is violated.Justice :A second group of nonutilitarian arguments against discrimination view it is as a violation ofthe principle of justice. “Social and economic inequalities are to be arranged so that they areattached to offices and positions open to all under conditions of fair equality of opportunity.Discriminatory practicesRegardless of the problem inherent in some of the arguments against discrimination, it isclear that there are strong reasons for holding that discrimination is wrong. It is consequentlyunderstandable that the law has gradually been changed to conform to these moralrequirements and that there has been a growing recognition of the various ways in whichBY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 3
  4. 4. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONdiscrimination in employment occurs. Among the practices now widely recognized asdiscriminatory are the following.Recruitment practicesFirms that rely solely on the word-of-mouth referrals of present employes to recruit newworkers tend to recruit only from those racial and sexual groups that are already representedin their labour force. When a firm‟s labour force is composed of only white males, thisrecruitment policy will tend to discriminate against minorities and women. Also, whendesirable job positions are only advertised in media that are not used by minorities or womenor are classified as for men only, recruitment will also tend to be discriminatory.Screening practiceJob qualification are discriminatory when they are not relevant to the job to beperformed.Aptitude or intelligence tests used to screen applicants become discriminatorywhen they serve to disqualify members from minority culture who are unfamiliar with thelanguage, concepts, and social situations used in the tests but who are in fact fully qualifiedfor the job.Job interviews are discriminatory if the interviewer routinely disqualifies women andminorities by relying on sexual or racial stereotypes. These stereotypes may includeassumptions about the sort of occupations “proper” for women, the sort of work and timeburdens that may fittingly be “imposed‟ on women, the ability of women or minority personto maintain “commitment” to job, the propriety of putting women in “male” environments,the assumed effects women or minorities would have on employee morale or on customers,and the extent to which women or minorities are assumed to have personality and aptitudetraits that make them unsuitable for a job. Such generalizations about women or minoritiesare not only discriminatory, they are also false.Promotion practicesPromotion, job progression, and transfer practice are discriminatory when employers placewhite males on job tracks separate from those open to women and minorities. Senioritysystems will be discriminatory if past discrimination has eliminated minorities and womenBY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 4
  5. 5. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONfrom the higher, more senior positions on the advancement ladder. To rectify the situation,individuals who have specifically suffered from discrimination in seniority system should begiven their rightful place in the seniority system and provide with whatever training isnecessary for visors, promotion policy will be discriminatory to the extent that supervisoryrely on racial or sexual stereotypes.Conditions of employment:Wages and salaries are discriminatory to the extent that equal wages and salaries are notgiven to people who are doing essentially the same work. If past discrimination or presentcultural traditions result in some job classification being disproportionately filled withwomen or minorities steps should be taken to make their comensation and benefitscomparable to those of other classification.Discharge:Firing an employee on the basis of race or sex is a clear form of discrimination. Less balatantbut still discriminatory are layoff policies that rely on a seniority system, in which womenand minorities have the lowest seniority because of past discriminations.Sexual HarassmentWomen, are victims of a particularly troublesome kind od discrimination that is both overtand coercive: They are subjected to sexual harassment. Although males are also frequentvictims. For all acknowledge frequency, sexual harassment still remains difficult to defineand to police and prevent.in 1978, the Equal Employment opportunity commission publisheda set of “guidelines” defining sexual harassment and setting out what, in its view, wasprohibited by the law.in their current form, the guidelines state:Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical contactsos sexual nature constitue sexual harassment (1) when submission to such individuals madeeither explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individuals employement,(submissionto or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employement decisionaffecting such individual, (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonablyBY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 5
  6. 6. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONinterfering with an individual‟s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile oroffensive working environment.How can we promote ethical practicesHow can we promote ethical practices within our field and reduce the negative stigmaattached to the headhunter? As there is no policing agency that oversees recruiting practices,ethics must be self-enforced. Ethical behavior begins with the definition of roles andresponsibilities when interacting with candidates, clients, and other recruiters. One of theways in which recruiters can foster an ethical relationship from the outstart is by creating amission statement or ethical code that emphasizes key values and guiding ethical practices.Ensuring that agreements are in writing can resolve complicated issues more quickly, bothprotecting your interests and allowing you to be upfront in relationships.Additionally, it is important to examine what is occurring around you. Detecting andeffectively handling unethical behavior is central to maintaining upstanding businesspractices. Although the bulk of this article places ehical responsibility on the recruiter, it isimportant to remember that commitments are made from all sides when entering into thehiring process. Candidates must also grapple with ethical issues, being honest throughout theprocess, from interviewing, to selection, to accepting an offer. Misinforming a recruiter toobtain an interview or cinch the job can place recruiters in compromising positions withclients. Both parties have a responsibility to maintain ethical standards.The benefits of ethical practices during each step of the hiring process are numerous.Recruiters often build their client bases through referrals. Both clients and candidates willrefer business to reliable, high-quality recruiters. Upon placement, candidates have no loyaltyto recruiters and poor practices may quickly become public knowledge. As in otherindustries, we all have a responsibility to uphold the reputation of our profession. Our dailybusiness practices reveal a professional standard against which we all are measured. Weshould use this daily opportunity to reflect a positive image.A brief review of why the selection decision is so difficult and hence why so manydefensive mechanisms are used, will both throw light on the subject and raise theethical dimension again. First, the inherent difficulties in the selection decision. Given thathuman beings are complex entities, and that all the mental activity that sits behind overtBY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 6
  7. 7. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONbehaviour is invisible to the observer, finding an objective way of define the capabilityavailable in the candidate is a challenge from the start. Given that organisations are justgroups of (complex) human beings transacting together in a common cause – well, at leastthat‟s the theory! – then there is a large extension to the level of complexity involved, and thejob of objectively defining what is needed for success in a job is possibly even morechallenging than defining what is available in candidates.Those two difficulties add up to a serious challenge for the knowledge and skills of theperson making the selection decision - this is the third challenge. There is, however, anassumption in all of this that needs airing. It is about the objectives to be achieved through theselection decision. If they are about fit with the culture and style of the business, that wouldlead in aparticular direction. If they are about fit with the rest of the management team, thedirection would be different. If they are abut the new manager being able to project the rightimage of the company, that would lead to yet another different direction.If the desire is for someone who will be a good team worker, and a safe pair of hands,thedirection would be different again. If the key is experience of the industry, and especially if„good contacts‟ are the order of the day, then the direction shifts once more.If theseis for someone who will be a good team worker, and a safe pair of hands, the directionwould be different again. If the key is experience of the industry, and especially if „goodcontacts‟ are the order of the day, then the direction shifts once more.If these are the objectives, then there are a lot of tools and techniques out there, to assist withthe decision. They range from the standard selection interview, through aptitude tests, criticalreasoning tests, psychometric inventories, emotional intelligence inventories and evengraphology, all the way through to motivation in action profiles.The problem is that all of these tools and techniques only make sense if the objectives are assuggested above. If, however, the objectives are rather more prosaic and useful, then the toolsand techniques noted above make no sense whatsoever. If there are selection objectives thatare grounded in reality, they will be all about whether or not the new manager will be able toperform adequately in the job – the performance objective.BY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 7
  8. 8. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONWill this person deliver the business results that are needed? Both in output terms and interms of the resources consumed on the way? Implicit in all this is the need to motivate andcarry people through the achievement of the business objectives, coping with complexity anda rapidly changing environment along the way, as that is what managing is all about.The „performance objective‟ reduces the focus of the selection decision down to skills andonly skills. As there is no evidence of a causal relationship between personality, hand writing,experience, aptitudes or any other characteristic assessed by the various „state-of-the-art‟inventories out there, on the one hand, and the performance delivered by the assessedmanager, on the other, there is only one possible justification left for using them. That is thedefence mechanism noted above.That raises the ethical dimension again. Is it ethical to rely on varieties of the standardselection interview and defensive assessments, and ignore the skills issue that is central toachieving required business results? If the skills issue is ignored, then the manager Makingthe selection decision is playing Russian roulette with the candidate, and leaving that personto suffer the consequences if the selection decision is wrong. Even worse, is when managersmaking poor selection decisions punish the new manager twice.First, is the transformation from success into failure; second is when the „failing manager‟ isfired by the very same manager who created the problem in the first place – by the poorselection decision.ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: DECISION-MAKING AND EMPLOYMENTRecruitment and selection is an area of decision-making that requires thorough attention,accompanied by best practice guidelines to ensure that risks of corruption and unfair practicesare minimised. Fortunately,recruitment and selection decision-makers have a wide range ofmaterial to guide their decision-making.Within the South African context we have thefollowing material available to guide our decision-making in recruitment and selectionBY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 8
  9. 9. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONFRAMEWORK OF LEGISLATION AND KEY SET OF VALUES CONCERNEDWITH EMPLOYEMENTFramework Of LegislationThe following legislation within the South African context, applies to various stages in therecruitment, selection and placement processes: Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995 Basic Conditions of Employment Act 75 of 1997 (updated) Employment Equity Act Skills Development Act 97 of 1998 (updated) and SAQA Occupational Health and Safety Act Unemployment Insurance Fund Act Pensions Fund Act Receiver of Revenue Smoking and Other Workplace Legislation Medical Schemes Act and Regulations Codes of Good Practice Public Holidays Act 35 of 1994,amended by 48 of 1995Promotion of Access to Information Act Promotion of Equality and Prevention of Unfair Discrimination Act Protected Disclosures Act Electronic Communications Acts Insolvency Act National Credit Act 34 of 2005 South African Constitution and Bill of RightsCompany PolicyCompany policy refers to guidelines, circulars, memoranda, policies and procedurespublished by the relevant organisation and should be freely available on the Intranet of theorganisation.Best Practice Guidelines in Recruitment and SelectionBest practice can be viewed as a well defined procedure, technique, method, process, activity,incentive or reward that is known to produce near optimum results. It is usually regarded asmore effective at delivering a particular outcome than any other technique, method, process,etc. When applied to a particular condition or circumstance.It also focuses on delivering thebest results with the least amount of effort, by applying procedures that have proventhemselves over time. A specific best practice guideline is generally applicable to a specificBY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 9
  10. 10. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONcondition or circumstance and can be modified for similar circumstances. Best Practice cantransform or mature as the industry discovers new developments.Key Set of ValuesAccording the Independent Commission against Corruption following are viewed as keyvalues that apply to Recruitment and Selection: Impartiality: all stages of the recruitment process should be impartial and Objective in its execution Accountability: all stakeholders in the recruitment process should be accountable for all their decisions and ensure proper record keeping to support such decisions Competition: the pool of potential candidates must be maximised to the extent that it is practicable and appropriate Openness: factors impacting on recruitment and selection must be clear to all stakeholders involved, and the decision-making processes should be transparent, whil maintaining confidentiality with regards to the candidate Integrity: recruitment and selection practices must be carried out in accordance with relevant guidelines, codes or rules. The following case studies illustrate some of the key values in the context of variouscommon areasof complaint in recruitment and selection:Case Study 1: Maximising The FieldJoe has been acting as the IT manager for 18 months when it was decided to advertise thejob.His Director prepared the advertisement without specifying any recruitment forqualifications or extensive experience in information technology, which had previously beenpart of theselection criteria. The Director decided to advertise the job internally. Joe was the soleapplicant and was appointed to the position permanently without an interview.Remarks: Receiving one application does not mean that is necessarily the best person for the job – but could indicate that the job has not been advertised widely enough to maximise the potential field of applicants. Perceptions of favouritism may result if the job that requires technical skill, tertiary qualifications or industry knowledge is advertised without requiring such competencies. It may appear that the Director deliberately removed such selection criteria that appeared previously, but may have precluded Joe from getting the job.What can be done instead? Acknowledge the importance of maximising the pool of applicantsBY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 10
  11. 11. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION Specifying the qualities sought from applicants, in addition to specific knowledge required,may broaden the field – e.g. instead of having knowledge of a specific act, the candidate can show he/she has the ability to interpret legislation. Ensure that potential candidates are not discouraged from applying for a job for reasons other than the content of the job advertisement; for example: advertisements placed in journals to which few people have access or managers making statements regarding the competitiveness or lack of competitiveness of applicants.Case Study 2: Putting It All On Paper (www.icac.nsw.gov.au, 2002)A large State Government department (International) advertised to fill the position ofDirector,Corporate Services, reclassified in a recent evaluation of its Senior ExecutiveService structure.Three short-listed applicants were interviewed and the selection paneloffered John the job.Shortly afterwards, the ICAC received a complaint alleging that Johnknew he had been appointed to the position before the interviews were held and got the jobbecause he had worked for the department before. The ICAC asked the department to reporton the matter.The department wanted to prove the recruitment process was above board so itsInternal Auditor reviewed the files. He was surprised that the cull checklist did not show howapplicants met the selection criteria and that there were no notes from the interviews. He alsofound that the selection panel report contained only the recommended applicant‟s name andthe convenor‟s signature (no date or title of the position, no recommended salary, no reasonsfor recommendations and no eligibility list).The selection panel claimed that John was not appointed to the position before the interviewand was clearly the best person for the job. However, the Auditor found no evidence tosupport this claim, making it difficult to assess the matter. Consequently, the departmentcould not satisfy the ICAC that the recruitment process was fair.Remarks: Better record keeping would have supported the department‟s claim that the process had been all above board. The way staff is recruited sets the standard for induction and the culture of the organisation.What can be done instead?Sound record keeping includes a selection report that includes the following: Specific assessment methods utilised Reasons for the candidates‟ unsuitability and reasons for selecting/ de-selecting prior to the interview. General notes or comments on each applicant interviewed, with reference to each selection criterion. Establish the reasons for the successful applicant being chosen over the rest of the pool of candidates. Include names of referees who were contacted and include notes taken from referee checks Notes made by each member of the selection panel should be retained on the recruitment,together with the selection report. report.BY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 11
  12. 12. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: A MODEL OF ETHICS FOR THE EMPLOYMENTPROCESSEthical Model: Recruitment & SelectionVan der Westhuizen (in Brand, 2008, p.208) states that there is an increase in appreciation forethicsmanagement and the positive economic impact it has on the performance of organisations.Phase 1:During phase one, a job analysis is conducted to compile a job description and jobspecification. The advertisement is then compiled based on criteria specified in the jobdescription. It is essential that the method of advertising does not lead to discrimination orexclusion of applicants. When considering initial applicants, they should be compared to theminimum criteria in the advertisement. Eliminations are then done according to theguidelines in the company recruitment and selection policy and procedures.Phase 1Job AnalysisCompilePhase 2:During phase two, applications are acknowledged by sending out a letter to all theapplicants. Applications are screened based on criteria from the advertisement making useof the same decision criteria for all the applications. Thereafter, a regret letter is sent toapplicants that did not pass the initial screening.Phase 3:Phase three includes conducting interviews of all applicants that meet the criteria. Theinterview should be asked the same questions of all applicants and should exclude anythingdiscriminatory. The assessments are then conducted by using instruments that are valid andreliable. Final assessment scores and information from the interview are integrated for theapplicants. Next, final interviews are conducted with short-listed applicants and an offer ismade to the successful applicant. It is essential that all documentation relating to therecruitment and selection process is completed accurately.BY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 12
  13. 13. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: THE USE OF PSYCHOMETRIC ASSESSMENTSThe Health Professions Council of South Africa regulates the health professions in theRepublic of South Africa with regard to registration, education and training, professionalconduct and ethical behaviour. Below are some ethical considerations pertaining topsychometric assessments from their ethical guidelines document, Form 94. When making use of psychometric assessments, it is important that they are seen to be one part of the selection process and are not solely relied on to make decisions regarding the employment of an individual. The psychometric assessments should predict success in the work situation as accurately as possible. Thus it is critical that the professional conducting the assessments has knowledge and understanding of the psychological instruments with which they work. The psychometric assessments should be reliable and valid, and free from bias or discrimination against any group of people. According to the Employment Equity Act No. 55 of 1998, psychometric testing and other similar assessments of an employee are prohibited unless the test or assessment being used: (a) has been scientifically shown to be valid and reliable; (b) can be applied fairly to employees; and (c) is not biased against any employee or group. The assessment process should be standardised and consistent to ensure that each candidate being assessed go through exactly the same process. The professional conducting the assessments should do so within the context of a professional relationship that is transparent. Informed consent must be obtained from the individual undertaking the assessment, informing them of the purpose of the assessments and how the results will be used. The confidentiality in terms of who will see the results should be clearly explained to the candidate. It is the responsibility of the professional to take the necessary steps to ensure that the results of the assessment are not misused by others in any way. This would include refraining from releasing the raw test results to any persons other than a qualified professional. It is essential that the individual or client organisation to whom the results are released, understands the ethical implications of how they should make use of the results. The interpretation of results should include additional information that has any bearing on the overall results pertaining to selection such as situational factors. When communicating the results of the assessment to the client, the professional should ensure that this is done in such a manner that the individual receiving the results fully understands those results.BY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 13
  14. 14. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION ConclusionRecruitment and selection form a vital function any business organization, since humanresource is treated as an asset of an organization, ethical issues governing recruitment andselection has to be taken into cognizance while recruiting and selecting an employee for aproposed job.Job discrimination is the major problem prevailing in many organization toady. Jobdiscrimination is the wrongful acts of distinguishing illicitly among people not on the basis ofindividual merit, but on the basis of prejudice or morally reprehensible attitude. Jobdiscrimination generally fall into three groups viz, utility, rights, justice.Regardless of the problem inherent in some of the arguments against discrimination, it isclear that there are strong reasons for holding that discrimination is wrong. It is consequentlyunderstandable that the law has gradually been changed to conform to these moralrequirements and that there has been a growing recognition of the various ways in whichdiscrimination in employment occurs.Discriminatory practices like sexual harassment is another major problem in manyorganization, effective majors have been taken to tackle this issue but still the problemprevails in many organization, effective measures have to be taken to get rid of these issue.So ethics in recruitment and selection has to be practicised in order to avoid jobdiscrimination.BY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 14
  15. 15. ETHICS IN RECRUITMENT AND SELECTIONBY POOJA .C AND RAVINDRA Page 15

×