Lecture#2 hardware

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Lecture#2 hardware

  1. 1. Computer Basics Sunday, October 31, 2010
  2. 2. Computer Basics Computer Technology Sunday, October 31, 2010
  3. 3. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  4. 4. The History of the Computer Sunday, October 31, 2010
  5. 5. The History of the Computer Then Sunday, October 31, 2010
  6. 6. The History of the Computer Then & Sunday, October 31, 2010
  7. 7. The History of the Computer Then & Now Sunday, October 31, 2010
  8. 8. Computer Evolution Sunday, October 31, 2010
  9. 9. Computer Evolution  1642 Blaise Pascal – mechanical adding machine Sunday, October 31, 2010
  10. 10. Computer Evolution Sunday, October 31, 2010
  11. 11. Computer Evolution Sunday, October 31, 2010
  12. 12. Computer Evolution  Early 1800’s Jacquard – uses punch cards to control the pattern of the weaving loom. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  13. 13. Computer Evolution  Early 1800’s Jacquard – uses punch cards to control the pattern of the weaving loom.  1832 Charles Babbage - invents the Difference Engine Sunday, October 31, 2010
  14. 14. Computer Evolution  Early 1800’s Jacquard – uses punch cards to control the pattern of the weaving loom.  1832 Charles Babbage - invents the Difference Engine Sunday, October 31, 2010
  15. 15. The Punch Card Sunday, October 31, 2010
  16. 16. The Punch Card  1890 Herman Hollerith – invents a machine using punch card to tabulate info for the Census. He starts the company that would later be IBM. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  17. 17. The Punch Card  1890 Herman Hollerith – invents a machine using punch card to tabulate info for the Census. He starts the company that would later be IBM. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  18. 18. Evolution (continued) Sunday, October 31, 2010
  19. 19. Evolution (continued) 1946 – Mauchly and Eckert created the ENIAC computer, first electronic computer is unveiled at University of Pennsylvania (shown on next slide) Sunday, October 31, 2010
  20. 20. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  21. 21. ENIAC Computer Sunday, October 31, 2010
  22. 22. ENIAC Computer  Miles of wiring Sunday, October 31, 2010
  23. 23. ENIAC Computer  Miles of wiring  18,000 vacuum tubes Sunday, October 31, 2010
  24. 24. ENIAC Computer  Miles of wiring  18,000 vacuum tubes  Thousands of resistors and switches Sunday, October 31, 2010
  25. 25. ENIAC Computer  Miles of wiring  18,000 vacuum tubes  Thousands of resistors and switches  No monitor Sunday, October 31, 2010
  26. 26. ENIAC Computer  Miles of wiring  18,000 vacuum tubes  Thousands of resistors and switches  No monitor  3,000 blinking lights Sunday, October 31, 2010
  27. 27. ENIAC Computer  Miles of wiring  18,000 vacuum tubes  Thousands of resistors and switches  No monitor  3,000 blinking lights  Cost $486,000 Sunday, October 31, 2010
  28. 28. ENIAC Computer  Miles of wiring  18,000 vacuum tubes  Thousands of resistors and switches  No monitor  3,000 blinking lights  Cost $486,000  100,000 additions per second Sunday, October 31, 2010
  29. 29. ENIAC Computer  Miles of wiring  18,000 vacuum tubes  Thousands of resistors and switches  No monitor  3,000 blinking lights  Cost $486,000  100,000 additions per second  Weighed 30 tons Sunday, October 31, 2010
  30. 30. 1943 Sunday, October 31, 2010
  31. 31. 1943  Base codes develop by Grace Hopper while working on the Mark I programming project. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  32. 32. 1943  Base codes develop by Grace Hopper while working on the Mark I programming project.  She invented the phrase “bug” – an error in a program that causes a program to malfunction. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  33. 33. 1950s Sunday, October 31, 2010
  34. 34. 1950s  Vacuum Tubes were the components for the electronic circuitry Sunday, October 31, 2010
  35. 35. 1950s  Vacuum Tubes were the components for the electronic circuitry  Punch Cards main source of input Sunday, October 31, 2010
  36. 36. 1950s  Vacuum Tubes were the components for the electronic circuitry  Punch Cards main source of input  Speeds in milliseconds (thousands/ sec) Sunday, October 31, 2010
  37. 37. 1950s  Vacuum Tubes were the components for the electronic circuitry  Punch Cards main source of input  Speeds in milliseconds (thousands/ sec)  100,000 additions/sec. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  38. 38. 1950s  Vacuum Tubes were the components for the electronic circuitry  Punch Cards main source of input  Speeds in milliseconds (thousands/ sec)  100,000 additions/sec.  Used for scientific calculations Sunday, October 31, 2010
  39. 39. 1950s  Vacuum Tubes were the components for the electronic circuitry  Punch Cards main source of input  Speeds in milliseconds (thousands/ sec)  100,000 additions/sec.  Used for scientific calculations  New computers were the rule, cost effectiveness wasn’t’ Sunday, October 31, 2010
  40. 40. 1960s Sunday, October 31, 2010
  41. 41.  Transistors were electronic circuitry (smaller, faster, more reliable than vacuum tubes) 1960s Sunday, October 31, 2010
  42. 42.  Transistors were electronic circuitry (smaller, faster, more reliable than vacuum tubes)  Speeds in microseconds (millionth/sec) 1960s Sunday, October 31, 2010
  43. 43.  Transistors were electronic circuitry (smaller, faster, more reliable than vacuum tubes)  Speeds in microseconds (millionth/sec)  200,000 additions/sec. 1960s Sunday, October 31, 2010
  44. 44.  Transistors were electronic circuitry (smaller, faster, more reliable than vacuum tubes)  Speeds in microseconds (millionth/sec)  200,000 additions/sec.  Computers In Businesses: Emphasis on marketing of computers to businesses 1960s Sunday, October 31, 2010
  45. 45.  Transistors were electronic circuitry (smaller, faster, more reliable than vacuum tubes)  Speeds in microseconds (millionth/sec)  200,000 additions/sec.  Computers In Businesses: Emphasis on marketing of computers to businesses  Data files stored on magnetic tape 1960s Sunday, October 31, 2010
  46. 46.  Transistors were electronic circuitry (smaller, faster, more reliable than vacuum tubes)  Speeds in microseconds (millionth/sec)  200,000 additions/sec.  Computers In Businesses: Emphasis on marketing of computers to businesses  Data files stored on magnetic tape  Computer Scientists controlled operations 1960s Sunday, October 31, 2010
  47. 47.  Transistors were electronic circuitry (smaller, faster, more reliable than vacuum tubes)  Speeds in microseconds (millionth/sec)  200,000 additions/sec.  Computers In Businesses: Emphasis on marketing of computers to businesses  Data files stored on magnetic tape  Computer Scientists controlled operations 1960s Sunday, October 31, 2010
  48. 48. Late 60’s Early 70’s Sunday, October 31, 2010
  49. 49. Late 60’s Early 70’s  Integrated circuit boards Sunday, October 31, 2010
  50. 50. Late 60’s Early 70’s  Integrated circuit boards  New input methods such as plotters, scanners Sunday, October 31, 2010
  51. 51. Late 60’s Early 70’s  Integrated circuit boards  New input methods such as plotters, scanners  Software became more important Sunday, October 31, 2010
  52. 52. Late 60’s Early 70’s  Integrated circuit boards  New input methods such as plotters, scanners  Software became more important  Sophisticated operating systems Sunday, October 31, 2010
  53. 53. Late 60’s Early 70’s  Integrated circuit boards  New input methods such as plotters, scanners  Software became more important  Sophisticated operating systems  Improved programming languages Sunday, October 31, 2010
  54. 54. Late 60’s Early 70’s  Integrated circuit boards  New input methods such as plotters, scanners  Software became more important  Sophisticated operating systems  Improved programming languages  Storage capabilities expanded (disks) Sunday, October 31, 2010
  55. 55. 1970’s Integrated circuits Sunday, October 31, 2010
  56. 56. Late 80’s to Current Sunday, October 31, 2010
  57. 57. Late 80’s to Current  Improved circuitry – several thousand transistors placed on a tiny silicon chip. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  58. 58. Late 80’s to Current  Improved circuitry – several thousand transistors placed on a tiny silicon chip.  Pentium chip named by Intel Sunday, October 31, 2010
  59. 59. Late 80’s to Current  Improved circuitry – several thousand transistors placed on a tiny silicon chip.  Pentium chip named by Intel  Modems – communication along telephone wires Sunday, October 31, 2010
  60. 60. Late 80’s to Current  Improved circuitry – several thousand transistors placed on a tiny silicon chip.  Pentium chip named by Intel  Modems – communication along telephone wires  Portable computers: laptops Sunday, October 31, 2010
  61. 61. Late 80’s to Current  Improved circuitry – several thousand transistors placed on a tiny silicon chip.  Pentium chip named by Intel  Modems – communication along telephone wires  Portable computers: laptops  Increased storage capabilities: gigabytes Sunday, October 31, 2010
  62. 62. Late 80’s to Current  Improved circuitry – several thousand transistors placed on a tiny silicon chip.  Pentium chip named by Intel  Modems – communication along telephone wires  Portable computers: laptops  Increased storage capabilities: gigabytes  Emphasis on information needed by the decision maker. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  63. 63. The Information Processing Cycle Sunday, October 31, 2010
  64. 64. The Information Processing Cycle INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  65. 65. The Information Processing Cycle INPUT PROCESSING Sunday, October 31, 2010
  66. 66. The Information Processing Cycle INPUT PROCESSING MAIN MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  67. 67. The Information Processing Cycle INPUT OUTPUTPROCESSING MAIN MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  68. 68. The Information Processing Cycle INPUT OUTPUT AUXILIARY STORAGE PROCESSING MAIN MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  69. 69. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware) Sunday, October 31, 2010
  70. 70. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware) INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  71. 71. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  72. 72. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  73. 73. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse  Joystick INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  74. 74. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse  Joystick  Trackball INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  75. 75. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse  Joystick  Trackball  Light pen INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  76. 76. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse  Joystick  Trackball  Light pen  Image scanner INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  77. 77. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse  Joystick  Trackball  Light pen  Image scanner  Touch tone telephone INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  78. 78. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse  Joystick  Trackball  Light pen  Image scanner  Touch tone telephone  Touch screens INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  79. 79. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse  Joystick  Trackball  Light pen  Image scanner  Touch tone telephone  Touch screens  Bar code scanner INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  80. 80. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse  Joystick  Trackball  Light pen  Image scanner  Touch tone telephone  Touch screens  Bar code scanner  Digitizer INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  81. 81. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse  Joystick  Trackball  Light pen  Image scanner  Touch tone telephone  Touch screens  Bar code scanner  Digitizer  Voice recognition INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  82. 82. INPUT DEVICES (Hardware)  Keyboard  Mouse  Joystick  Trackball  Light pen  Image scanner  Touch tone telephone  Touch screens  Bar code scanner  Digitizer  Voice recognition  Auxiliary Storage Device INPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  83. 83. PROCESSING HARDWARE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  84. 84. PROCESSINGPROCESSING HARDWARE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  85. 85.  Central Processing Unit: CPU PROCESSINGPROCESSING HARDWARE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  86. 86.  Central Processing Unit: CPU  The Brains or Intelligence of the computer. Controls input and output PROCESSINGPROCESSING HARDWARE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  87. 87.  Central Processing Unit: CPU  The Brains or Intelligence of the computer. Controls input and output  The part of the computer that interprets and executes instructions.  Silicon chip: integrated circuit board  Pentium: name give to a particular chip PROCESSINGPROCESSING HARDWARE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  88. 88.  Central Processing Unit: CPU  The Brains or Intelligence of the computer. Controls input and output  The part of the computer that interprets and executes instructions.  Silicon chip: integrated circuit board  Pentium: name give to a particular chip PROCESSINGPROCESSING HARDWARE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  89. 89. What two numbers are used in Binary Code? Sunday, October 31, 2010
  90. 90. What two numbers are used in Binary Code?  0 and 1 Sunday, October 31, 2010
  91. 91. What two numbers are used in Binary Code?  0 and 1  They are each called a BIT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  92. 92. What two numbers are used in Binary Code?  0 and 1  They are each called a BIT  8 BITS make a BYTE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  93. 93. What two numbers are used in Binary Code?  0 and 1  They are each called a BIT  8 BITS make a BYTE  1 BYTE makes a letter or number Sunday, October 31, 2010
  94. 94. What two numbers are used in Binary Code?  0 and 1  They are each called a BIT  8 BITS make a BYTE  1 BYTE makes a letter or number  KILOBYTE = 1,024 bytes Sunday, October 31, 2010
  95. 95. What two numbers are used in Binary Code?  0 and 1  They are each called a BIT  8 BITS make a BYTE  1 BYTE makes a letter or number  KILOBYTE = 1,024 bytes  MEGABYTE = 1,048,576 bytes Sunday, October 31, 2010
  96. 96. What two numbers are used in Binary Code?  0 and 1  They are each called a BIT  8 BITS make a BYTE  1 BYTE makes a letter or number  KILOBYTE = 1,024 bytes  MEGABYTE = 1,048,576 bytes  GIGABYTE = 1,024 megabytes Sunday, October 31, 2010
  97. 97. What two numbers are used in Binary Code?  0 and 1  They are each called a BIT  8 BITS make a BYTE  1 BYTE makes a letter or number  KILOBYTE = 1,024 bytes  MEGABYTE = 1,048,576 bytes  GIGABYTE = 1,024 megabytes  TERABYTE = 1,024 gigabytes Sunday, October 31, 2010
  98. 98. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  99. 99. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  100. 100. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  101. 101. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM READ ONLY MEMORY MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  102. 102. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM READ ONLY MEMORY  Small MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  103. 103. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM READ ONLY MEMORY  Small  Instructions are installed permanently at the factory MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  104. 104. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM READ ONLY MEMORY  Small  Instructions are installed permanently at the factory  Cannot be changed MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  105. 105. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM READ ONLY MEMORY  Small  Instructions are installed permanently at the factory  Cannot be changed  These instructions check the computer’s resources and looks for Operating System MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  106. 106. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM READ ONLY MEMORY  Small  Instructions are installed permanently at the factory  Cannot be changed  These instructions check the computer’s resources and looks for Operating System RAM MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  107. 107. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM READ ONLY MEMORY  Small  Instructions are installed permanently at the factory  Cannot be changed  These instructions check the computer’s resources and looks for Operating System RAM RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  108. 108. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM READ ONLY MEMORY  Small  Instructions are installed permanently at the factory  Cannot be changed  These instructions check the computer’s resources and looks for Operating System RAM RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY  Main Memory MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  109. 109. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM READ ONLY MEMORY  Small  Instructions are installed permanently at the factory  Cannot be changed  These instructions check the computer’s resources and looks for Operating System RAM RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY  Main Memory  Temporary—it is erased when turned off. MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  110. 110. MEMORY PROCESSING HARDWARE ROM READ ONLY MEMORY  Small  Instructions are installed permanently at the factory  Cannot be changed  These instructions check the computer’s resources and looks for Operating System RAM RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY  Main Memory  Temporary—it is erased when turned off.  It is where programs and data is stored while being processed MEMORY Sunday, October 31, 2010
  111. 111. OUTPUT DEVICES Sunday, October 31, 2010
  112. 112. OUTPUT DEVICES OUTPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  113. 113. OUTPUT DEVICES  Useful information that leaves the system OUTPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  114. 114. OUTPUT DEVICES  Useful information that leaves the system  Output Hardware includes: OUTPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  115. 115. OUTPUT DEVICES  Useful information that leaves the system  Output Hardware includes: •Monitor: soft copy •Printers: hard copy •Flat Panel displays •Voice and music - speakers •Synthesizers •Plotters OUTPUT Sunday, October 31, 2010
  116. 116. AUXILIARY STORAGE DEVICES Sunday, October 31, 2010
  117. 117. AUXILIARY STORAGE DEVICES AUXILIARY STORAGE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  118. 118. AUXILIARY STORAGE DEVICES  Network Drive (H: drive) AUXILIARY STORAGE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  119. 119. AUXILIARY STORAGE DEVICES  Network Drive (H: drive)  Hard Disk Drive (C:drive) AUXILIARY STORAGE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  120. 120. AUXILIARY STORAGE DEVICES  Network Drive (H: drive)  Hard Disk Drive (C:drive)  Floppy Disk Drive with 3 ½” Floppy Disk (A:drive) AUXILIARY STORAGE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  121. 121. AUXILIARY STORAGE DEVICES  Network Drive (H: drive)  Hard Disk Drive (C:drive)  Floppy Disk Drive with 3 ½” Floppy Disk (A:drive)  Smart card AUXILIARY STORAGE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  122. 122. AUXILIARY STORAGE DEVICES  Network Drive (H: drive)  Hard Disk Drive (C:drive)  Floppy Disk Drive with 3 ½” Floppy Disk (A:drive)  Smart card  CD Read/Write Drive AUXILIARY STORAGE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  123. 123. AUXILIARY STORAGE DEVICES  Network Drive (H: drive)  Hard Disk Drive (C:drive)  Floppy Disk Drive with 3 ½” Floppy Disk (A:drive)  Smart card  CD Read/Write Drive  Zip Drive AUXILIARY STORAGE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  124. 124. AUXILIARY STORAGE DEVICES  Network Drive (H: drive)  Hard Disk Drive (C:drive)  Floppy Disk Drive with 3 ½” Floppy Disk (A:drive)  Smart card  CD Read/Write Drive  Zip Drive  Digital Audio Tape AUXILIARY STORAGE Sunday, October 31, 2010
  125. 125. Computer Hardware Sunday, October 31, 2010
  126. 126. Hardware Sunday, October 31, 2010
  127. 127. Hardware  Includes the electronic and mechanical devices that process the data; refers to the computer as well as peripheral devices Sunday, October 31, 2010
  128. 128. System Unit Sunday, October 31, 2010
  129. 129. System Unit  Case that holds the power supply, storage devices and the circuit boards (including the motherboard). Sunday, October 31, 2010
  130. 130. CPU (Central Processing Unit) Sunday, October 31, 2010
  131. 131. CPU (Central Processing Unit)  Where the processing in a computer takes place, often called the brain of the computer. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  132. 132. CPU (Central Processing Unit)  Where the processing in a computer takes place, often called the brain of the computer. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  133. 133. Circuits Sunday, October 31, 2010
  134. 134. Circuits  The path from one component of a computer to another that data uses to travel. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  135. 135. Circuits  The path from one component of a computer to another that data uses to travel.  Circuits run between  RAM and the microprocessor  RAM and various storage devices Sunday, October 31, 2010
  136. 136. Circuits  The path from one component of a computer to another that data uses to travel.  Circuits run between  RAM and the microprocessor  RAM and various storage devices Sunday, October 31, 2010
  137. 137. Circuits  The path from one component of a computer to another that data uses to travel.  Circuits run between  RAM and the microprocessor  RAM and various storage devices Sunday, October 31, 2010
  138. 138. Silicon Chip Sunday, October 31, 2010
  139. 139. Silicon Chip  Silicon is melted sand. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  140. 140. Silicon Chip  Silicon is melted sand.  What the circuits are embedded into to keep them together. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  141. 141. Silicon Chip  Silicon is melted sand.  What the circuits are embedded into to keep them together. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  142. 142. Peripheral Devices Sunday, October 31, 2010
  143. 143. Peripheral Devices  Devices connected by cable to the CPU. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  144. 144. Peripheral Devices  Devices connected by cable to the CPU.  Used to expand the computer’s input, output and storage capabilities. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  145. 145. Input Devices Sunday, October 31, 2010
  146. 146. Input Devices  Units that gather information and transform that information into a series of electronic signals for the computer. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  147. 147. Input Devices  Units that gather information and transform that information into a series of electronic signals for the computer. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  148. 148. Keyboard Sunday, October 31, 2010
  149. 149. Keyboard  An arrangement of letters, numbers, and special function keys that act as the primary input device to the computer. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  150. 150. Keyboard  An arrangement of letters, numbers, and special function keys that act as the primary input device to the computer. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  151. 151. Mouse Sunday, October 31, 2010
  152. 152. Mouse  An input device that allows the user to manipulate objects on the screen by moving the mouse along the surface of the desk. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  153. 153. Mouse  An input device that allows the user to manipulate objects on the screen by moving the mouse along the surface of the desk. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  154. 154. Sound Card Sunday, October 31, 2010
  155. 155. Sound Card  A circuit board that gives the computer the ability to accept audio input, play sound files, and produce audio output through speakers or headphones. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  156. 156. Sound Card  A circuit board that gives the computer the ability to accept audio input, play sound files, and produce audio output through speakers or headphones. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  157. 157. Modem Sunday, October 31, 2010
  158. 158. Modem  A device that sends and receives data to and from computers over telephone lines. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  159. 159. Modem  A device that sends and receives data to and from computers over telephone lines.  Means (Modulate – Demodulate). Sunday, October 31, 2010
  160. 160. Modem  A device that sends and receives data to and from computers over telephone lines.  Means (Modulate – Demodulate). Sunday, October 31, 2010
  161. 161. Modem  A device that sends and receives data to and from computers over telephone lines.  Means (Modulate – Demodulate). Sunday, October 31, 2010
  162. 162. Output Devices Sunday, October 31, 2010
  163. 163. Output Devices  Devices that display, print or transmit the results of processing from the computers memory. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  164. 164. Output Devices  Devices that display, print or transmit the results of processing from the computers memory. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  165. 165. Monitor Sunday, October 31, 2010
  166. 166. Monitor  Display device that forms an image by converting electronic signals from the computer into points of colored light on the screen. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  167. 167. Resolution Sunday, October 31, 2010
  168. 168. Resolution  The density of the grid used to display or print text and graphics; the greater the horizontal and vertical density, the higher the resolution. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  169. 169. Resolution  The density of the grid used to display or print text and graphics; the greater the horizontal and vertical density, the higher the resolution.  The amount of Pixels on the screen. The more pixels the better the resolution. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  170. 170. Pixels Sunday, October 31, 2010
  171. 171. Pixels  The smallest unit in a graphic image; computer display devices use a matrix of pixels to display text and graphics. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  172. 172. Pixels  The smallest unit in a graphic image; computer display devices use a matrix of pixels to display text and graphics.  Basic unit of composition of an image on a TV screen, Computer monitor, or similar display Sunday, October 31, 2010
  173. 173. Printer Sunday, October 31, 2010
  174. 174. Printer  Output device that produces text or graphical images on paper. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  175. 175. Printer  Output device that produces text or graphical images on paper. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  176. 176. Speakers Sunday, October 31, 2010
  177. 177. Speakers  Output devices that receive signals from the computer’s sound card to play music, narration, or sound effects. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  178. 178. Speakers  Output devices that receive signals from the computer’s sound card to play music, narration, or sound effects. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  179. 179. Storage Devices Sunday, October 31, 2010
  180. 180. Storage Devices  Used to keep data when the power to the computer is turned off. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  181. 181. Storage Devices  Used to keep data when the power to the computer is turned off.  Different forms  Hard disk  Floppy or zip disks  CD-Writer Sunday, October 31, 2010
  182. 182. Storage Devices  Used to keep data when the power to the computer is turned off.  Different forms  Hard disk  Floppy or zip disks  CD-Writer Sunday, October 31, 2010
  183. 183. Storage Devices  Used to keep data when the power to the computer is turned off.  Different forms  Hard disk  Floppy or zip disks  CD-Writer Sunday, October 31, 2010
  184. 184. Formatted Sunday, October 31, 2010
  185. 185. Formatted  Arrangement of data for storage or display. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  186. 186. Formatted  Arrangement of data for storage or display.  All storage devices must be formatted. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  187. 187. Hard Disk Sunday, October 31, 2010
  188. 188. Hard Disk  Rigid magnetic disk mounted for permanent storage Sunday, October 31, 2010
  189. 189. Floppy Disk Sunday, October 31, 2010
  190. 190. Floppy Disk  Small portable magnetic disk enclosed in stiff envelope Sunday, October 31, 2010
  191. 191. Compact Discs Sunday, October 31, 2010
  192. 192. Compact Discs  CD-ROM  Compact disk with read only memory Sunday, October 31, 2010
  193. 193. Compact Discs  CD-ROM  Compact disk with read only memory  CD-R  Compact disk which you can write to only one time. It then becomes a read only disk. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  194. 194. Compact Discs  CD-ROM  Compact disk with read only memory  CD-R  Compact disk which you can write to only one time. It then becomes a read only disk.  CD-RW  Compact disk which you may rewrite to. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  195. 195. DVD Sunday, October 31, 2010
  196. 196. DVD  DVD ROM  Digital Video Disk which is read only. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  197. 197. DVD  DVD ROM  Digital Video Disk which is read only.  DVD-R  Digital Video Disk which can be written to one time. It then becomes read only. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  198. 198. DVD  DVD ROM  Digital Video Disk which is read only.  DVD-R  Digital Video Disk which can be written to one time. It then becomes read only.  DVD-RW  Digital Video Disk which can be rewritten to. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  199. 199. Flash or Jump Drives Sunday, October 31, 2010
  200. 200. Flash or Jump Drives  External storage devices that can be used like a external hard drive. Sunday, October 31, 2010
  201. 201. Flash or Jump Drives  External storage devices that can be used like a external hard drive.  They have the capability to be saved to, deleted from, and files can be renamed just like with a normal hard drive. Sunday, October 31, 2010

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