Gamers In The Stacks

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  • 1. GAMERS IN THE STACKS REBECCA STEFFEN JULY 16 TH , 2008
  • 2. WHY GAMING PROGRAMS
    • Improving the relationship between the library and teens
    • Meeting the communities content needs
    “ We’ve also learned that content is not just about text, and that media doesn’t have to be socially redeeming, or even any good, for our patrons to want to consume it…. … If we were supposed to restrict ourselves to offering materials with purely redeeming social qualities and educational value, we’d have to throw out half the collection.” Jenny Levine jlevine@ala.org February 4, 2008 -- Eli Neiburger, “Gamers…in the Library?”
  • 3. HOW BIG IS GAMING?
    • 2007 sales in the United States reached 18.8 billion
    • The top ten selling games of 2007 totaled over 27 million
    • There are approximately 111million consoles being used in the United States.
    • 69% of U.S. Designated as heads of households now play some video games
    • http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/c50376
  • 4. HOW MANY LIBRARIES OFFER GAMING?
    • About 75% of libraries support gaming
    • About 80% allow patrons to play games on library computers
    • About 40% run gaming programs
    • About 13% run video gaming programs
    • About 20% circulate games
    • Jenny Levine Feb. 4 2008 http://theshiftedlibrarian.com/presentations/2008/20080204DominicanGaming.pdf
  • 5. REASONS LIBRARIES OFFER GAMING PROGRAMS
    • 80% Provide a source of entertainment for members of the community
    • 79% Provide additional service for a group of active library users
    • 76% To attract underserved group of users to the library
    • 74% To increase the library’s role as a community hub.
  • 6. WHERE PEOPLE ARE GAMING
    • PC
    • Internet
    • Console
      • Popular consoles
        • Nintendo Wii
        • Xbox 360
        • Playstation 2
        • Playstation 3
    • Handhelds
      • Popular handhelds
        • Nintendo DS
        • PSP (Playstation Portable)
    • Cellphones
  • 7. TYPES OF GAMES VIDEO GAMES
    • Action/Adventure
      • Lego Indiana Jones
    • Shooter
      • Brother in Arms
    • Fighting
      • Super Smash Bros. Brawl
    • Racing
      • Mario Cart
    • Puzzle
      • Boom Blox
    • Sims (Simulation)
      • The Sims
    • Sports
      • NHL 08
      • Wii Play
    • Minigames/Party Games
      • Mario Party
    • MMO’s (Massive Multiplayer Online game)
      • World of WarCraft
    • Music
      • Guitar Hero
      • Rock Band
  • 8. U.S. RATINGS
    • 85% of all games sold in 2007 were rated teen or younger
    • http://www.dabbledoo.com
  • 9. GAMING SERVICES
    • Collection development
      • Gaming related magazines, books, DVDS
    • Reader’s advisory
    • Open play
    • Tournament play
    • Game creation
    • Jenny Levine jlevine@ala.org February 4, 2008
  • 10. MAGAZINES FOR GAMERS
    • Official Xbox Magazine
    • Tips and Tricks
    • EGM (Electronic Gaming Monthly)
    • Playstation: The Official Magazine
    • Computer Games
    • GamePro
  • 11. GAMING PROGRAMMING
    • Tournament
      • Multiplayer
      • Rating
      • Time Investment
        • Official Ref.
        • Time Limit or limiting entries
        • Other activities
        • Scoring System
        • PROMOTE
    • Free play
      • Console and Computer
    • Borrow or Purchase?
      • Wii $250 for console, about $50 per game
        • Guitar Hero $99, Rock Band $140, DDR $70
      • PS2 $129 for console, about $20-40 for a game
        • Guitar Hero $55, Rock Band $99
      • Xbox $299 for console, about $60 per game
  • 12. RESOURCES
    • Gamers in the Library?!: the why, what, and how of videogame tournaments for all ages – Eli Neiburger
    • Video Games as a Service: Three Years Later, Erin V. Helmrich and Eli Neiburger. Voice of Youth Advocates. June 2007
    • Gaming: YALSA, teen tech week 2008 @ your library. http://www.ala.org/ala/yalsa/teentechweek/ttw08/resourcesabcd/techguide_gaming.pdf
    • If Your Not Gaming Your Loosing (video) , Erik Boekesteijn and Jaap van de Geer, DOK Library Concept Center: http://www.vimeo.com/1208483
    • The Role of Gaming in Libraries: Taking the Pulse – Dr Scott Nicholson. http://gaming.techsource.ala.org/index.php/Who_Else_Is_Playing%3F_The_Current_State_of_Gaming_in_Libraries
    • The Shifted Librarian Wiki – Jenny Levine http://theshiftedlibrarian.pbwiki.com/
  • 13. ONLINE GAMING SITES
    • http://www.popcap.com – Numerous “pick up and play” web games. All games are available online and should require no installation (note: some games might require an active x installation that will be prompted when starting a game. Once the active x program is installed, there shouldn’t be any other installations for other games). Great for all ages. - http://www.addictinggames.com – In the same vein as popcap. Some of the games may be more properly suited for older children - http://www.womgames.com/index.php - Home of the ever popular “snood”. Snood is a puzzle game that imitates the popular arcade game “bust a move”. I know quite a few people addicted to this one. - http://www.runescape.com – The popular free massively multiplayer game that sets players in a semi-medieval adventure. After researching, I’ve found a parents guide to the game located here: http://www.runescape.com/kbase/viewcategory.ws?ref=main&cat_id=884 It appears they have a chat filter built in the game to help prevent poor language. - http://www.battleon.com/ - This is the site for the very popular “adventure quest” game. Adventure quest is an online role playing game aimed at a younger audience. Resource sites - http://internetgames.about.com/library/glossary/blglossary.htm - About.com resource site for commonly used gaming jargon. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_games - Wikipedia entry on the history and future of video games. Interesting read! - http://www.esrb.org/index-js.jsp - The ESRB (entertainment software ratings board) is the standard for rating all games before they go to retail. These ratings help determine the age group and what content will be exposed with a game. You can also use this site to search for games for a certain age group.