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B1 and b2 (test manual) B1 and b2 (test manual) Document Transcript

  • Direction: Read and analyze the following questions. Choose the best answer.<br />It is the range of actual and possible goals of counseling wherein it’s suggest the benefit at a client in a form of therapy.<br />Counseling Therapy<br />Supportive Therapy<br />Psychotherapy<br />Psycho-educational guidance<br />Answer: B. Supportive Therapy. The term “supportive therapy” suggest that some clients may primarily need and benefit from a form of therapy that upholds current ego-strength and/or coping skills and does not seek to challenge or uncover.<br />Reference: (Feltham, Colin and Horton, Ian. The SAGE Handbook of Counseling and Psychotherapy. SAGE Publications. 2005. p. 11)<br />This has usually has been severely criticized by counselors and therapists to people that may be helped simply to adjust to their circumstances.<br />Crisis intervention and management<br />Adjustment and resource provision<br />Psycho-educational guidance<br />Supportive therapy<br />Answer: B. Adjustment and resource provision. It is a probably a fact in at least some counseling settings (e.g. employee assistance programmes (EAPs)) that clients seek short-term adjustments-oriented help that may include elements of supportive therapy, problem solving skills, assertiveness training, brainstorming solutions, plus the provision of contextual information.<br />Reference: (Feltham, Colin and Horton, Ian. The SAGE Handbook of Counseling and Psychotherapy. SAGE Publications. 2005. p. 11)<br /> A wide range of psychologically informed practices are to be found under this umbrella term.<br />Support<br />Crisis intervention and management<br />Psycho-educational guidance<br />Adjustment and resource provisions<br />Answer: C. Psycho-educational guidance. Appropriate information giving, administering of questionnaires, coaching, mentoring, provision of social skills, life-skills training, assertiveness and relaxation training, marriage enrichment programmes, parent effectiveness training, relapse prevention programmes, stress inoculation training, emotional intelligence and positive psychology training are all examples. All aim to identify improvable behaviour and to teach personal skills in various areas of life.<br />Reference:(Feltham, Colin and Horton, Ian. The SAGE Handbook of Counseling and Psychotherapy. SAGE Publications. 2005. p. 11)<br />These terms are used broadly here to interlude the intervention and support of professionals in the aftermath of plane crash, bank raid or personal disasters.<br />Accident management unit<br />Life security program<br />National services and training program<br />Crisis intervention management<br />Answer: D. Crisis intervention management. Survivors and witnesses of critical incidents or breakdowns of many kinds are often offered immediate help which includes debriefing, support, practical and active-directive help, referral to specialist resources, and gradual restoration of normal functioning.<br /> The aim is to provide sensitive, non-intrusive, psychologically strengthening help in the first instance, avoiding connotations of psychopathology. Crisis intervention is concerned primarily with the restoration of the level of functioning that existed to the crisis.<br />Reference:(Feltham, Colin and Horton, Ian. The SAGE Handbook of Counseling and Psychotherapy. SAGE Publications. 2005. p. 12)<br />This is the purpose of entering counseling or therapy.<br />To interfere with personal problems of others<br />To build a good image in the social system<br />To examine a life situation or dilemma and come to a resolution or decisions<br />To establish altruism<br />Answer: C. To examine a life situation or dilemma and come to a resolution or decisions<br />The aim is to facilitate exploration of issues, feelings and practicalities; addressing anxiety and loss may be a part of the process. In some approaches, a philosophy and techniques of problems solving may be impaired as a proactive tool for living.<br />Reference:(Feltham, Colin and Horton, Ian. The SAGE Handbook of Counseling and Psychotherapy. SAGE Publications. 2005. p. 12)<br />These goals are not identified, too broad, or not prioritized.<br />Unrealistic Goals<br />Uncoordinated Goals<br />Unfocused Goals<br />Undefined Goals<br />Answer: C. Unfocused Goals. Sometimes counselors and clients may leave unfocused goals alone because the time and expense of chasing them is not as productive as changing unwanted behaviors. In most cases, however, it is helpful to identify a client’s goals, put them into a workable form, and decide which goals to pursue first. <br />Reference:( Gladding, Samuel. 2004.Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 140)<br />These goals are defined as by either counselor or client, that include happiness, perfection, progress, being number one to self-actualization.<br />Uncoordinated Goals<br />Unrealistic Goals<br />Undefined Goals<br />Unfocused Goals<br />Answer: B. Unrealistic Goals. They have merit but are not easily obtained or sustained. For example, the client who has worked hard and is happy about being promoted will soon have to settle into the duties of the new job and the reality of future job progress. <br />Unrealistic goals may best dealt with by putting them into the context of broader life goals. Then the counselor may encourage the client to devise exploratory and homework strategies for dealing with them.<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004.Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 140)<br />This goal is generally divided into two groups, those probably reality and those seemingly.<br />Uncoordinated Goals<br />Unfocused Goals<br />Unrealistic Goals<br />Undefined Goals<br />Answer: A. Uncoordinated Goals. In the first group are goals that may be incompatible with one another or with the personality of the client. A person who seeks counseling but really does not wish to work on changing exemplifies an individual with incompatible goals. <br />These clients are often labeled resistant. Into the second group. Rule places the goals of clients who appear to have uncoordinated goals but really do not. These individuals may be afraid to take personal responsibility and engage any helper in a “yes, but..” dialogue.<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004.Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 140)<br />This is the criteria for judging effective goals in counseling that states mutuality.<br />Goals are mutually agreed on by client and counselor<br />Goals are specific<br />Goals are relevant to self-defeating behavior<br />Goals are achievement and success oriented<br />Answer: A. Goals are mutually agreed on by client and counselor. Without mutuality neither party will invest much energy in working on the goals<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004.Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 140)<br />This is the criteria for judging effective goals in counseling that states payoff for clients.<br />Goals are achievement and success oriented<br />Goals are mutually agreed on by client and counselor<br />Goal are specific<br />Goals are relevant to self-defeating behavior<br />Answer: A. Goals are achievement and success oriented. Counseling goals needs to be realistic and have both intrinsic and extrinsic payoffs for clients.<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004.Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 140)<br />This characteristic of a counselor discusses that it is safe to risk sharing the clients concerns and feelings openly.<br />Effective counselors communicate caring and respect foe the persons they are trying to help.<br />Effective counselors are able to reach in as well as to reach out.<br />Effective counselors inspire feelings of trust, credibility and confidence from the people they help. <br />Effective counselors are able to reason systematically and to think in terms of system.<br />Answer: C. Effective counselors inspire feelings of trust, credibility and confidence from the people they help. <br />In the presence of effective helpers, clients quickly sense that it is safe to risk sharing their concerns and feelings openly and that they will not be ridiculed, embarrassed, criticized for their disclosures. Nothing bad will happen as a consequence of sharing and there is a real chance that something productive will come of it.<br />
    • Reference: (Welfel, Elizabeth Reynolds. 2005. The Counseling Process: A Multitheoretical Integrative Approach. USA: Thomson Learning Academic Resource Center, p. 13)
    This characteristic of a counselor is defined as the counselors thinking about their actions, feelings, value commitment and motivations.<br />Effective counselors are able to reach in as well as to reach out.<br />Effective counselors communicate caring and respect for the person they are trying to help.<br />Effective counselors manage conflict between client and counselor effectively.<br />Effective counselors are able to reason systematically and to think in terms of system.<br />Answer: A. Effective counselors are able to reach in as well as to reach out.<br />Counselors show a commitment to non-defensive, continuous self-understanding and self-examination. They are aware of the feelings they experience and the sources of those.<br />
    • Reference: (Welfel, Elizabeth Reynolds. 2005. The Counseling Process: A Multitheoretical Integrative Approach. USA: Thomson Learning Academic Resource Center, p. 13)
    • It is a characteristic of a counselor that discusses the honest and open communication of clients to the counselors.
    • Effective counselors communicate caring and respect for the persons they are trying to help.
    • Effective counselors are skillful at reaching out.
    • Effective counselors are able to reach out as well as to reach out.
    • Effective counselors attempt to understand the behavior of the people they try to help without imposing value judgments
    • Answer: B. Effective counselors are skillful ate reaching out
    • Through their demeanor and underlying views about others, effective counselors are able to encourage others to communicate openly and honestly with them. By actively listening for the client’s feelings, beliefs, assumptions about self, significant others, and life circumstances, effective counselors avoid responding in ways that create defensiveness and block communication.
    • Reference: (Welfel, Elizabeth Reynolds. 2005. The Counseling Process: A Multitheoretical Integrative Approach. USA: Thomson Learning Academic Resource Center, p. 13)
    • This is the first stage of the culture centered approach.
    • Increasing Multicultural Awareness
    • Developing Multicultural Knowledge
    • Developing Multicultural Skill
    • All of the above
    • Answer: A. Increasing Multicultural Awareness
    • This is the first stage in a multicultural centered approach. Increased cultural awareness is indicated in a variety of ways.
    • Reference: (Harper, Frederick D. and Mcfadden, John. Culture and Counseling. Allyn and Bacon. 2003. p. 32)
    This is the second stage culture centered competence.<br />Developing Multicultural Knowledge<br />Developing Multicultural Skill<br />Increasing Multicultural Awareness<br />All of the Above<br />Answer: A. Developing Multicultural Knowledge<br />This is the second stage in cultural centered competence. Having multicultural knowledge and comprehension is indicated in a variety of ways.<br />
    • Reference: (Harper, Frederick D. and Mcfadden, John. Culture and Counseling. Allyn and Bacon. 2003. p. 34 )
    • This is the third stage in developing multicultural competency.
    • Developing Multicultural Knowledge
    • Increasing Multicultural Awareness
    • Developing Multicultural Skill
    • All of the above
    • Answer: C. Developing Multicultural Skill
    • This is the third stage in developing multicultural competency. Having multicultural skill is indicated in variety of ways.
    • Reference: (Harper, Frederick D. and Mcfadden, John. Culture and Counseling. Allyn and Bacon. 2003. p. 37 )
    • It is the risk of the counselor’s impairments and emotional difficulties.
    • a. Counselors are humans and they feel exhausted too.
    • Counselors has a separate life of being a professional and being a simple human.
    • Counselors who have worked through their own emotional difficulties or who are not overwhelmed by stress in their personal lives are at risk for impairments.
    • All of the above
    • Answer: C. Counselors who have worked through their own emotional difficulties or who are not overwhelmed by stress in their personal lives are at risk for impairments.
    • They can develop burnout, an experience of emotional depletion, alienation from clients, and sense of futility in their work (Maslach, Jackson, and Leiter, 1996) Burnout happens when they let their work become the only focus in their lives and when they work under conditions that make the job itself stressful. This combination of circumstances puts counselors at risk of losing perspective on their effectiveness and their clients.
    • Reference: (Welfel, Elizabeth Reynolds. 2005. The Counseling Process: A Multitheoretical Integrative Approach. USA: Thomson Learning Academic Resource Center, p. 15)
    18. These counselors emphasize preventive and developmental counseling to provide students with the life skills needed to deal with problems before they occur and to enhance the students’ personal, social and academic growth.<br />Mental Health Counselor<br />Guidance Counselor<br />Community Counselor<br />School Counselor<br />Answer: D. School Counselor. School counselors at all levels help students understand and deal with social, behavioral, and personal problems. These counselors emphasize preventive and developmental counseling to provide students with the life skills needed to deal with problems before they occur and to enhance the students’ personal, social and academic growth. <br />Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline. 2004. Counseling Psychology. Manila: Educational Publishing House, p. 118 -119)<br />19. This is the definition of behavioral change. <br />To effect change in behavior which will enable the counselee to live a more productive, satisfying life as he defines it within society’s limitation<br />To enable the individual to make critical decisions<br />To enable the individual to commit himself to projects, investing time and energy and being willing to take appropriate economic, psychological and physical risks.<br />To bring out the resolution of whatever problems were brought to the counseling relationship<br />Answer: A. To effect change in behavior which will enable the counselee to live a more productive, satisfying life as he defines it within society’s limitation.<br />Wendell E. Miller stated that all counseling systems have goals of bringing about changes in the counselee, whether it be in his feelings, his thinking, his beliefs or his behavior.<br />Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline. 2004. Counseling Psychology. Manila: Eduactional Publishing House, p. 80-82)<br />20. It is the most exact term for counselors. <br />Guidance Counselors<br />Counseling Psychologist/Therapist<br />Social Worker<br />Social Advisers<br />Answer: B. Counseling Psychologists/ Therapist. They are individuals who often have master degrees in various disciplines, including psychology, counseling and social work. Some others are licensed professional counselors and clinical social workers. Therapists provide counseling and many are trained to provide psychological testing.<br />Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline; 2004, Counseling Psychology, Manila: Eduactional Publishing House, p. 91)<br />21. This person emphasizes the equalitarian relationship with the clients.<br />Alfred Adler<br />Fritz Perls<br />Carl Rogers<br />Rollo May<br />Answer: A. Alfred Adler. Alfred Adler emphasizes the equalitarian relationship with the client.<br />Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline. 2004. Counseling Psychology. Manila: Eduactional Publishing House, p. 122)<br />22. It symbolizes the green background color of the official seal of the Guidance and Counseling Acts of 2004. <br />Growth and hope<br />Justice<br />Enrichment and learning<br />Peace and order<br />Answer: A. Growth and Hope. The color green represents growth and hope.<br />Reference: (Official Gazette. Vol.104. Manila: Philippines, August 25, 2008. No. 34, p. 5743)<br />23. This represents the sun’s rays of the official seal. <br />Light and it’s radiance<br />Project Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao<br />Represents the necessary processing that a gem undergoes to retain its brilliance<br />Represents positive outlook in life<br />Answer: A. Light and it’s radiance. The sun’s rays signify light, it’s radiance brightens the world.<br />Reference: (Official Gazette, Vol 104, Manila: Philippines, August 25, 2008; No. 34 p. 5743)<br />24. This person noted the personal and professional qualities of counselors.<br />Beth Strong<br />Loesch and Siegal<br />Barbara Okun<br />Watkins and Schneider<br />Answer: C. Barbara Okun. Okun noted that it is hard to separate the helper’s personality characteristics from his or her levels and styles of functioning because both are interrelated.<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004.Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 130)<br />25. She gives emphasis on the counselor authority and understanding of the client uniqueness, stress on personal relationship, modeling and sharing of experiences.<br />Fritz Perls<br />Rollo May<br />Carl Rogers<br />Alfred Adler<br />Answer: B. Rollo May. Rollo May emphasis on counselor authenticity and understanding of the client uniqueness, stress on personal relationship, modeling and sharing of experiences.<br />Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline. 2004. Counseling Psychology, Manila: Educational Publishing House, p. 122)<br />26. This kind of counseling provides services to elderly persons.<br />a. Gerontological Counseling<br />b. Multicultural Counseling<br />c. Genetic Counseling<br />d. Both B and C<br />Answer: A. Gerontological Counseling. Gerontological Counselors provide services to elderly people who face changing lifestyles because of aging and health problems.<br />Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline. 2004. Counseling Psychology, Manila: Educational Publishing House, p. 121)<br />27. This kind of counseling provides information and support to families who have members with birth defects or genetic disorder.<br />Multicultural Counseling<br />Genetic Counseling<br />Gerontological Counseling<br />Both A and C<br />Answer: B. Genetic Counseling. Genetic Counseling identify family at risk, investigates the problem that is present in the family, interpret information about the disorder, analyze inheritance patterns and risks of recurrence and reviews available options with the family.<br />Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline. 2004. Counseling Psychology, Manila: Educational Publishing House, p. 122)<br />28. This is the role of the counselor. <br />Individuals’ behavior in performing the rights and obligations of the position.<br />Constitute a definition of behavior that is proper for the role.<br />Expectations and directives for behavior connected with his position<br />Counselors’ blueprint of action.<br />Answer: B. Constitute a definition of behavior that is proper for the role.<br />Individual’s behavior in performing the rights and obligations of the position. Role of the counselor is most simply defined as the expectations and directives for behavior connected with his position. <br />Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline. 2004. Counseling Psychology, Manila: Educational Publishing House, p. 113-114)<br />29. This is also known as the Article II of R.A. No. 9258. <br />a. Board of Guidance and Counseling<br />b. Board of Guidance Counselors<br />c. Board Counselors<br />d. Board of Guidance and the Counselors<br />Answer: A. Board of Guidance and Counseling. Section 5 (p), Article II of R.A. No. 9258, known as the Guidance and Counseling Act of 2004. This was approved by Sgd. Leonor Tripon – Rosero, Sgd. Ruth Raña Padilla and Sgd. Nilo L. Rosas<br />Reference: (Official Gazette. Vol.104. Manila: Philippines, August 25, 2008. No. 34, p. 5743)<br />30. This is the definition of professional counseling as defined by American Counseling Association. <br />Focused on serious problems associated with intrapsychic, internal and personal issues and conflicts.<br />The process of helping people makes important choices that affect their lives.<br />It is a way of helping people<br />The application of mental health, psychological or human development principles, through cognitive, affective, behavioral or systemic interventions, strategies that address wellness, personal growth, or career development as well as pathology.<br />Answer: D. The application of mental health, psychological or human development principles, through cognitive, affective, behavioral or systemic interventions, strategies that address wellness, personal growth, or career development as well as pathology. <br />The definition of the practice of professional counseling is defined by Smith and accepted by the Governing Council of the American Counseling Association.<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004. Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 6)<br />31. The counselor is more likely to have more clients with this kind of characteristic. <br />Attractive Counselor<br />Physically Fit Counselor<br />Unattractive Counselor<br />Admirable Counselor<br />Answer: A. Attractive Counselor. According to Harris and Busby physical features make a difference. Clothes should be clean, neat and professional looking but not call attention to themselves.<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004. Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 131)<br />
    • 32. This characteristic of a counselor can be related to the system of a human body.
    • a. Effective counselors are able to reason systematically and to think in terms if system.
    • b. Effective counselors must rationalize and use scientific methods of solving problems.
    • c. Effective counselors have expertise in some area that will be of special value to the client.
    • d. Both A and B
    Answer: A. Effective counselors are able to reason systematically and to think in terms if system.A system is an organized entity in which each component relate the others and to the system as a whole. Example is the human body system, the organizational setting in which a person works, and the family unit. In-high entropy systems, component works cooperatively with each other and contribute favorably to the goals of the total system.<br />Reference: (Welfel, Elizabeth Reynolds. 2005. The Counseling Process: A Multitheoretical Integrative Approach. USA: Thomson Learning Academic Resource Center, p. 17)<br />33. It is one of the characteristic of counselor which is concerned with judgments of behaviors.<br />Effective counselors attempt to understand the behavior of the people they try to help without imposing value judgments.<br />Effective counselors manage conflict between client and counselor effectively.<br />Effective counselors have expertise in some area that will be of special value to the clients.<br />Effective counselors are able to reason systematically and think in terms of system.<br />Answer: A. Effective counselors attempt to understand the behavior of the people they try to help without imposing value judgments.<br />People have a tendency to make value judgments about the behavior of others-to judge the behavior of others by one’s own standards. Effective helpers work hard to control the tendency to judge the values of their clients. Instead, they accept a given behavior pattern as the client’s way of coping with some life situation, and they try to understand how the pattern developed.<br />Reference: (Welfel, Elizabeth Reynolds. 2005. The Counseling Process: A Multitheoretical Integrative Approach. USA: Thomson Learning Academic Resource Center, p. 16)<br />34. It is one of the qualities of a counselor which is a function of perceived similarity between a client and counselor as well as physical features.<br />Perceived Expertness<br />Attractiveness<br />Trustworthiness<br />Both A and C<br />Answer: B. Attractiveness. Counselor can make themselves attractive by speaking in clear, simple jargon – free sentences and offering appropriate self disclosure (Watkins and Schneider, 1989). <br />The manner in which a counselor greets the client and maintains eye contact can also increase the attractiveness rating. Counselors who use nonverbal cues in responding such as head nodding and eye contact, are seen as more attractive than those who do not (Claiborn, 1979 and Lacross, 1975).<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004. Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 131)<br />35. It is related to the sincerity and consistency of the counselor.<br />Attractiveness<br />Perceived Expertness<br />Trustworthiness<br />Both A and B<br />Answer: C. Trustworthiness. The counselor is genuinely concerned about the client and shows it over time by establishing a close relationship. <br />But as Fong and Cox (1983) note, many clients test the trustworthiness of the counselor by requesting information, telling a secret, asking a favor, inconveniencing the counselor, deprecating themselves, or questioning the motives and dedication of the counselor. It is essential, therefore, that the counselor respond to the question of trust rather than the verbal content of the client in order to facilitate the counseling relationship.<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004. Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 131)<br />36. It is the awareness of the differences between laws and ethics.<br />Legal Issues<br />Ethical Issues<br />Competence<br />Ethical Reasoning and Decision Making<br />Answer: A. Legal Issues. Counselors need to be knowledgeable about laws that relate to multicultural counseling practice.<br />
    • Reference: (Harper, Frederick D. and Mcfadden, John. Culture and Counseling. Allyn and Bacon. 2003. p. 373)
    • 37. This is one of the dimensions of competence that includes one’s own biases values and assumptions about human behavior.
    • Awareness
    • Understanding
    • Skills
    • Competence
    • Answer: A. Awareness.The ethical responsibility to gain self-awareness is emphasized in the ACA code of ethics, which states that counselors are aware of their own values, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors and how these apply in a diverse society, and avoid imposing their values on clients.
    • Reference:(Harper, Frederick D. and Mcfadden, John. Culture and Counseling. Allyn and Bacon. 2003. p. 365)
    • 38. It is the second area of multicultural competence which is defined as to gain knowledge and understanding of the worldviews of culturally diverse clients.
    • Awareness
    • Understanding
    • Skills
    • Competence
    • Answer: B. Understanding. This competency is reflected in the standard that requires counselors to actively attempt to understand the diverse cultural backgrounds of the clients with whom they work.
    • Reference:(Harper, Frederick D. and Mcfadden, John. Culture and Counseling. Allyn and Bacon. 2003. p. 365)
    • 39. This the third step in multicultural practice.
    • Awareness
    • Understanding
    • Skills
    • Competence
    • Answer: C. Skills. The third step is to translate the acquired self-awareness and knowledge into skills for multicultural practice. Counselors have an ethical obligation to demonstrate a commitment to gain knowledge, personal awareness. Sensitivity and skills pertinent to working with a diverse client population.
    • Reference:(Harper, Frederick D. and Mcfadden, John. Culture and Counseling. Allyn and Bacon. 2003. p. 365)
    • 40. This is the definition of identifying goal according to Fgan.
    Occurs when a client is given the opportunity to talk about situation, or to tell personal stories. <br />The energizing fabric of daily living but are often elusive<br />The end result sought, or in this case, the objective which counseling strives to accomplish<br />To portray counseling as most appropriate for the person who seeks self-understanding and growth rather than a solution for an immediate, pressing concern.<br />Answer: A. Occurs when a client is given the opportunity to talk about situation, or to tell personal stories. <br />The counselors reinforces the client’s focus on self by providing structure, actively listening (hearing both content and feelings) and helping identify and clarify goals.<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004. Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 140)<br />41. In this unacceptable counseling expectation, the counseling is considered as the primary responsibility of school counselors.<br />
    • Parent Expectancies
    • Teacher Expectancies
    • Expectancies of School Administrators
    • Expectations of Governmental Agencies
    • Answer: B. Teacher Expectancies. The major impression is that teacher expects counseling to reduce or eliminate pupil behavior that causes classroom friction and disturbance.
    Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline. 2004. Counseling Psychology, Manila: Educational Publishing House, p. 81)<br />42. This is one of the unacceptable counseling expectations where in it is characterized by them assuming that it will result in an efficient school organization.<br />Parent Expectancies<br />Teacher Expectancies<br />Expectancies of School Administrators<br />Expectations of Governmental Agencies<br />Answer: C. Expectancies of School Administrators<br />They want counseling to be supportive of school policies and to reinforce student conformity and acceptance of the status quo. In short, counseling sought to produce fewer organizational disruptions <br />Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline. 2004. Counseling Psychology, Manila: Educational Publishing House, p. 81)<br />43. It is defined as to enable the individual to make decisions that are of critical importance to him.<br />Behavioral Change<br />Positive Mental Health<br />Problem Resolution<br />Decision Making<br />Answer: D. Decision Making. It is not the counselor’s job to decide what decisions the counselee should make or to choose alternate courses of action for him.<br />Reference: (De Jesus, Evangeline. 2004. Counseling Psychology, Manila: Educational Publishing House, p. 85)<br />44. It is the term that almost all therapist and counselors avoid to use.<br />Cure<br />Medicate<br />Pathetic<br />Sick<br />Answer: A. Cure. Almost all the therapists and counselors avoid use of the term ‘cure’ and any client expectations that therapy will result in final and dramatic removal of suffering. <br />Reference: (Feltham, Colin and Horton, Ian. The SAGE Handbook of Counseling and Psychotherapy. SAGE Publications. 2005. p. 12)<br />45. This is the Maslow’s hierarchy of needs top level where in it suggests the possible goal at counseling as an aim towards becoming a better person.<br />Self-realization<br />Self-depreciation<br />Self-actualization<br />Self-esteem<br />Answer: C. Self-actualization. Under this heading, may be included all aims towards becoming a better person, having greater self-awareness or self-knowledge and attaining a state of fully functioning personhood. <br />The range of goals subsumed here may include, for example, anything from ‘I want to be more assertive/risk-taking/happy’, to ‘I want to try out everything life has to offer, I want to overcome all obstacles in my life and find the real me.’ Concepts of individuation, maturation, finding the real self, being true to oneself and increasing self-awareness fit here.<br />Reference: (Feltham, Colin and Horton, Ian. The SAGE Handbook of Counseling and Psychotherapy. SAGE Publications. 2005. p. 13)<br />46. It is the actual range and possible goal of counseling that suggest the complete change at the client.<br />Cure<br />Personality Change<br />Systemic, Organizational or Social Change<br />Discovery of meaning and transcendental experience<br />Answer: B. Personality Change. At an illusory level, the rather retiring, somewhat unattractive and untalented person may fantasize that therapy will compensatorily convert him or her into everything that he or she is not. <br />However, a number of client claims and testimonies based on dramatic disappearance of distressing symptoms or limitations (‘Therapy completely changed/saved my life’) have suggested major life changes as a desired outcome for some clients.<br /> <br />Reference: (Feltham, Colin and Horton, Ian. The SAGE Handbook of Counseling and Psychotherapy. SAGE Publications. 2005. p. 13)<br />47. It is actual range and possible goals at counseling where in it explicitly involves the religious aspect at the clients life. <br />Theological orientation<br />Spiritual Acceptance<br />Discovery at meaning and transcendental experience<br />All of the above<br />Answer: C. Discovery at meaning and transcendental experience<br />Particularly in the wake of the relative decline of formal religion and loss of spiritual and moral leaders and mentors, it seems that therapy has become for many an avenue for the exploration of existential. Spiritual or metaphysical meaning and transcendental experience. The existential, humanistic and transpersonal approaches lend themselves most explicitly to such aspirations.<br /> <br />Reference: (Feltham, Colin and Horton, Ian. The SAGE Handbook of Counseling and Psychotherapy. SAGE Publications. 2005. p. 13)<br />48. This criteria for judging effective goals in counseling states that if goals are defined quantitatively, achievement is most easily recognized.<br />Goals are specific<br />Goals are relevant to self-defeating behavior<br />Goals are quantifiable and measurable<br />Goals are mutually agreed on by client and counselor<br />Answer: C. Goals are quantifiable and measurable. It is important that both client and counselor know when goals are achieved.<br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004. Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 140)<br />49. This criteria for judging effective goals in counseling is responsible for clear communication and restating the goals.<br />Goals are behavioral and observable<br />Goals are understandable and can be restated clearly<br />Goals are specific<br />Goals are relevant to self-defeating behavior<br />Answer: B. Goals are understandable and can be restated clearly<br />It is vital that client and counselor communicate clearly about goals. One way to assess how well this process is achieved is through restating goals in one’s own words. <br />Reference: (Gladding, Samuel. 2004. Counseling: A Comprehensive Profession. New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall, p. 141)<br />50. This is the investigation of causes at problematic feelings, thoughts and behavior as the primary goals.<br />Symptom amelioration<br />Insight and understanding<br />Problem Solving and decision making<br />Cure<br />Answer: B. Insight and understanding. Both client and therapist may wish to pursue the search for historical causes and the reasons for persistently counter-productive behaviour in current life circumstances (“Why did this happen to me? Why am like this? Aha! –now I see where this cones from”). <br />For some practitioners and clients, the goals of therapy may be the attainment of deeper and deeper insights or a state of continuous understanding of self, of how conflicts arise, of motivations. Etc.<br />Reference: (Feltham, Colin and Horton, Ian. The SAGE Handbook of Counseling and Psychotherapy. SAGE Publications. 2005. p. 12)<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />