Parts of Speech<br />
NOUN<br />The function of a noun is to name something: a person, a place, an object, or an idea. “Basketball” and “relatio...
NOUN<br />A noun is simply a name, a word that identifies whatever it is you’re talking about, such as “Jack” or “home” or...
NOUN<br />“Progress” is a noun. “Embarrassment” and “running” and “millimeter” are nouns. Basically, anything you can put ...
PRONOUN<br />The function of a pronoun is to stand in for a noun. “Which” and “she” are pronouns.<br />
PRONOUN<br />Pronouns are words such as “he,” “she,” “it,” and “that,” which take the place of nouns so that we don’t have...
PRONOUN<br />If you have trouble remembering the definition, just take the word apart: “pro” means “for” as in “pro-govern...
VERB<br />The function of a verb is to describe an action or a state of being. “Run” and “is” are verbs.<br />
VERB<br />Verbs describe an action or a state of being. Their role is to make a statement about the subject of your senten...
ADJECTIVE<br />The function of an adjective is to modify the meaning of a noun or pronoun. “Blue” and “cheery” are adjecti...
ADJECTIVE<br />Adjectives are words that modify nouns and pronouns. That is, they alter slightly the meaning of the noun o...
ADVERB<br />The function of an adverb is to modify the meaning of a noun, an adjective, or another adverb. “Swiftly” and “...
ADVERB<br />Adverbs are modifiers: They define or limit the meaning of other words. But unlike adjectives, which can only ...
ADVERB<br />As the name suggests, the most common role of the adverb is to modify the meaning of a verb, usually by answer...
PREPOSITION<br />The function of a preposition is to express the relationship between a noun or a pronoun and certain othe...
PREPOSITION<br />Prepositions are a piece of cake. They are simply words used to show a relationship between a noun or a p...
PREPOSITION<br />There is also such a thing as a compound preposition, which serves exactly the same purpose of expressing...
CONJUNCTION<br />The function of a conjunction is to join together words or phrases. “And” and “but” are conjunctions.<br />
CONJUNCTION<br />Conjunctions are words that join other words and phrases together, just as the back end of the term conju...
INTERJECTION<br />The function of an interjection is to express excitement and emotion independently from the other words ...
PERSON<br />The first-person singular is I.<br />The second-person singular is you.<br />The third-person singular is he, ...
Prepared by:<br />G.Babu<br />Lect / English<br />
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Parts of speech

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Transcript of "Parts of speech"

  1. 1. Parts of Speech<br />
  2. 2. NOUN<br />The function of a noun is to name something: a person, a place, an object, or an idea. “Basketball” and “relationship” are nouns.<br />
  3. 3. NOUN<br />A noun is simply a name, a word that identifies whatever it is you’re talking about, such as “Jack” or “home” or “rock.” You may remember the term “noun” being defined in school as a person, place, or thing. This is a good way to think about it provided you remember that “thing” refers to more than the things you can point to or touch. It also includes intangibles— ideas, concepts, qualities and actions. “Freedom” is a noun. <br />
  4. 4. NOUN<br />“Progress” is a noun. “Embarrassment” and “running” and “millimeter” are nouns. Basically, anything you can put the word “the” in front of is a noun or is being used as a noun. “Being used as a noun” refers back to the idea that many words can play more than one part of speech. “Light,” for example, can be both a noun, as in the light of day or a verb, as in I light the candles. Just remember that whenever the word in question is being used to name or identify something, you’re dealing with a noun.<br />
  5. 5. PRONOUN<br />The function of a pronoun is to stand in for a noun. “Which” and “she” are pronouns.<br />
  6. 6. PRONOUN<br />Pronouns are words such as “he,” “she,” “it,” and “that,” which take the place of nouns so that we don’t have to drive each other nuts saying things such as Harry went to Harry’scar and then Harry drove to pick up Susan, and then Harry and Susan drove to Harry’s father’s house. Instead, we can use pronouns to refer back to some of the nouns in the sentence, and say, Harry went to his car and then he drove to pick up Susan, and then they went to his father’s house. <br />
  7. 7. PRONOUN<br />If you have trouble remembering the definition, just take the word apart: “pro” means “for” as in “pro-government” or “pro vs. con,” so “pronoun” simply means “for a noun.” It would be great if pronouns were no more complicated than that. But they come in all kinds of flavors and varieties designed to handle different assignments within a sentence, and they won’t do anything outside of their specific job descriptions. <br />
  8. 8. VERB<br />The function of a verb is to describe an action or a state of being. “Run” and “is” are verbs.<br />
  9. 9. VERB<br />Verbs describe an action or a state of being. Their role is to make a statement about the subject of your sentence, that is, about whomever or whatever you’re talking. When we refer to a verb describing an action, we mean this in its broadest sense, including not only physical actions such as “run,” “grow,” or “squeeze,” but also nonphysical actions such as “hope,” “solve,” and “need.” Any word describing what the subject of the sentence is doing is an action verb.<br />
  10. 10. ADJECTIVE<br />The function of an adjective is to modify the meaning of a noun or pronoun. “Blue” and “cheery” are adjectives.<br />
  11. 11. ADJECTIVE<br />Adjectives are words that modify nouns and pronouns. That is, they alter slightly the meaning of the noun or pronoun, either by describing something about it or by limiting its meaning to a more definite item or number. In the phrases red hair, swollen feet, and unpredictable temper, the adjectives “red,” “swollen,” and “unpredictable” have modified the nouns “hair,” “feet,” and “temper” by describing a characteristic of each.<br />
  12. 12. ADVERB<br />The function of an adverb is to modify the meaning of a noun, an adjective, or another adverb. “Swiftly” and “very” are adverbs.<br />
  13. 13. ADVERB<br />Adverbs are modifiers: They define or limit the meaning of other words. But unlike adjectives, which can only modify nouns or pronouns, adverbs have a kind of prima donna complex.<br />They leave nouns and pronouns alone, but they feel they have something important to say about nearly everybody else—modifying verbs, adjectives, and each other. Let’s look first at the different jobs the adverb can do.<br />
  14. 14. ADVERB<br />As the name suggests, the most common role of the adverb is to modify the meaning of a verb, usually by answering the questions where, when, how, or to what extent. For example, in the phrase, leave quickly, “leave” is the verb, and the adverb “quickly” describes the manner in which the action of leaving is carried out. A few more examples: Look longingly, answer abruptly, move forward, stop immediately, sometimes play, nearly finish, always love.<br />
  15. 15. PREPOSITION<br />The function of a preposition is to express the relationship between a noun or a pronoun and certain other words in the sentence. “Inside” and “under” are prepositions.<br />
  16. 16. PREPOSITION<br />Prepositions are a piece of cake. They are simply words used to show a relationship between a noun or a pronoun and certain other words in your sentence. And the easy way to remember this is to think of the word “position” contained within “preposition”—as in the position of one thing relative to another.<br />In the sentence Harry drank himself under the table, “under” is the preposition. It shows the relationship between the unwise “Harry” (a noun) and “table” (another noun). Other common prepositions include “above,” “after,” “around,” “at,” “before,” “below,” “between,” “by,” “during,” “except,” “from,” and “within.”<br />
  17. 17. PREPOSITION<br />There is also such a thing as a compound preposition, which serves exactly the same purpose of expressing a relationship between two things, but which is made up of more than one word, such as “according to,” “because of,” and “instead of.”<br />
  18. 18. CONJUNCTION<br />The function of a conjunction is to join together words or phrases. “And” and “but” are conjunctions.<br />
  19. 19. CONJUNCTION<br />Conjunctions are words that join other words and phrases together, just as the back end of the term conjunction suggests.<br />(Think of the junction of two freeways.) There are coordinating conjunctions such as “and,” “or,” “nor,” “but,” “for,” “yet,” and “so,” and subordinating conjunctions such as “because,”<br />“when,” “if,” “though,” “unless,” “until,” and “whether.”<br />
  20. 20. INTERJECTION<br />The function of an interjection is to express excitement and emotion independently from the other words in the sentence. “Hey” and “oh” are interjections.<br />
  21. 21. PERSON<br />The first-person singular is I.<br />The second-person singular is you.<br />The third-person singular is he, she, or it.<br />The first-person plural is we.<br />The second-person plural is you.<br />The third-person plural is they.<br />
  22. 22. Prepared by:<br />G.Babu<br />Lect / English<br />

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