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UF College of Education, EDH 6931

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  • This slide is for display to the audience to show them how they will vote on your polls in your presentation-> You can remove this slide if you like or if the audience is already comfortable with texting and/or voting with Poll Everywhere->Sample Oral Instructions:Ladies and gentlemen, throughout today’s meeting we’re going to engage in some audience polling to find out what you’re thinking, what you’re up to and what you know-> Now I’m going to ask for your opinion-> We’re going to use your phones to do some audience voting just like on American Idol->So please take out your cell phones, but remember to leave them on silent-> You can participate by sending a text message->This is a just standard rate text message, so it may be free for you, or up to twenty cents on some carriers if you do not have a text messaging plan-> The service we are using is serious about privacy-> I cannot see your phone numbers, and you’ll never receive follow-up text messages outside this presentation-> There’s only one thing worse than email spam – and that’s text message spam because you have to pay to receive it!
  • This slide is for display to the audience to show them how they will vote on your polls in your presentation-> You can remove this slide if you like or if the audience is already comfortable with texting and/or voting with Poll Everywhere->Sample Oral Instructions:Ladies and gentlemen, throughout today’s meeting we’re going to engage in some audience polling to find out what you’re thinking, what you’re up to and what you know-> Now I’m going to ask for your opinion-> We’re going to use your phones or laptops to do some audience voting just like on American Idol->So please take out your mobilephones or laptops, but remember to leave them on silent-> You can participate by submitting an answer atPoll4->com on your laptop or a mobile phone->The service we are using is serious about privacy-> I cannot see who you are or who voted->
  • Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the pollIf you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides-> You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone->
  • Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the pollIf you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides-> You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone->
  • Tragedy is the “imitation of an action” (mimesis) according to “the law of probability or necessity->” Aristotle indicates that the medium of tragedy is drama, not narrative; tragedy “shows” rather than “tells->” According to Aristotle, tragedy is higher and more philosophical than history because history simply relates what has happened while tragedy dramatizes what may happen, “what is possibile according to the law of probability or necessity->” History thus deals with the particular, and tragedy with the universal-> Events that have happened may be due to accident or coincidence; they may be particular to a specific situation and not be part of a clear cause-and-effect chain-> Therefore they have little relevance for others-> Tragedy, however, is rooted in the fundamental order of the universe; it creates a cause-and-effect chain that clearly reveals what may happen at any time or place because that is the way the world operates-> Tragedy therefore arouses not only pity but also fear, because the audience can envision themselves within this cause-and-effect chain (context)->Plot is the “first principle,” the most important feature of tragedy-> Aristotle defines plot as “the arrangement of the incidents”: i->e->, not the story itself but the way the incidents are presented to the audience, the structure of the play-> According to Aristotle, tragedies where the outcome depends on a tightly constructed cause-and-effect chain of actions are superior to those that depend primarily on the character and personality of the protagonist-> Plots that meet this criterion will have the following qualities (context)-> See Freytag's Triangle for a diagram that illustrates Aristotle's ideal plot structure, and Plot ofOedipus the King for an application of this diagram to Sophocles’ play->The plot must be “a whole,” with a beginning, middle, and end-> The beginning, called by modern critics the incentive moment, must start the cause-and-effect chain but not be dependent on anything outside the compass of the play (i->e->, its causes are downplayed but its effects are stressed)-> The middle, or climax, must be caused by earlier incidents and itself cause the incidents that follow it (i->e->, its causes and effects are stressed)-> The end, or resolution, must be caused by the preceding events but not lead to other incidents outside the compass of the play (i->e->, its causes are stressed but its effects downplayed); the end should therefore solve or resolve the problem created during the incentive moment (context)-> Aristotle calls the cause-and-effect chain leading from the incentive moment to the climax the “tying up” (desis), in modern terminology the complication-> He therefore terms the more rapid cause-and-effect chain from the climax to the resolution the “unravelling” (lusis), in modern terminology the dénouement (context)->The plot must be “complete,” having “unity of action->” By this Aristotle means that the plot must be structurally self-contained, with the incidents bound together by internal necessity, each action leading inevitably to the next with no outside intervention, no deus ex machina (context)-> According to Aristotle, the worst kinds of plots are “‘episodic,’ in which the episodes or acts succeed one another without probable or necessary sequence”; the only thing that ties together the events in such a plot is the fact that they happen to the same person-> Playwrights should exclude coincidences from their plots; if some coincidence is required, it should “have an air of design,” i->e->, seem to have a fated connection to the events of the play (context)-> Similarly, the poet should exclude the irrational or at least keep it “outside the scope of the tragedy,” i->e->, reported rather than dramatized (context)-> While the poet cannot change the myths that are the basis of his plots, he “ought to show invention of his own and skillfully handle the traditional materials” to create unity of action in his plot (context)-> Application to Oedipus the King->The plot must be “of a certain magnitude,” both quantitatively (length, complexity) and qualitatively (“seriousness” and universal significance)-> Aristotle argues that plots should not be too brief; the more incidents and themes that the playwright can bring together in an organic unity, the greater the artistic value and richness of the play-> Also, the more universal and significant the meaning of the play, the more the playwright can catch and hold the emotions of the audience, the better the play will be (context)->The plot may be either simple or complex, although complex is better-> Simple plots have only a “change of fortune” (catastrophe)-> Complex plots have both “reversal of intention” (peripeteia) and “recognition” (anagnorisis) connected with the catastrophe-> Both peripeteia and anagnorisis turn upon surprise-> Aristotle explains that a peripeteia occurs when a character produces an effect opposite to that which he intended to produce, while an anagnorisis “is a change from ignorance to knowledge, producing love or hate between the persons destined for good or bad fortune->” He argues that the best plots combine these two as part of their cause-and-effect chain (i->e->, the peripeteia leads directly to the anagnorisis); this in turns creates the catastrophe, leading to the final “scene of suffering” (context)-> Application to Oedipus the King->
  • Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the pollIf you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides-> You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone->
  • Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the pollIf you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides-> You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone->
  • You may decide to use notes to remind yourself what you needed to talk about on any given slide-> Perhaps like this one of a google image site-> I was searching for an image of a presentation room, and then I clicked on Advanced Search to limit my search by the Create Commons licensing->
  • You may decide to use notes to remind yourself what you needed to talk about on any given slide-> Perhaps like this one of a google image site-> I was searching for an image of a presentation room, and then I clicked on Advanced Search to limit my search by the Create Commons licensing->
  • TraditionalCourse with no online technology used —content is delivered in writing or orally->Web FacilitatedCourse which uses web-based technology to facilitate what is essentially a face-to-face course-> Uses a course management system (CMS) or web pages to post the syllabus andassignments, for example->Blended/HybridCourse that blends online and face-to-face delivery-> Substantial proportion of the content is delivered online, typically uses online discussions, and typically has someface-to-face meetings->OnlineA course where most or all of the content is delivered online-> Typically have no face-to-face meetings->
  • Transcript

    • 1. <p><strong>Slide 1: </strong> 1 Tuesday, February 23, 4:00pm – 7:00pm This evening we will consider instructional technology in Higher Education using classroom response systems, effective presentations, and collaborative work environments-&gt; EDH 6931 COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY FACULTY Randy Graff, PhD 352-&gt;273-&gt;5051 | rgraff@ufl-&gt;edu </p><p><strong>Slide 2: </strong>2 Here is the plan •Classroom Response •Effective Presentations •Guidelines •Animation •Collaboration </p><p><strong>Slide 3: </strong> How To Vote via Texting 3 </p><p><strong>Slide 4: </strong> How To Vote via Poll4-&gt;com 4 </p><p><strong>Slide 5: </strong>5 </p><p><strong>Slide 6: </strong> Integrate into PowerPoint 6 </p><p><strong>Slide 7: </strong>7 </p><p><strong>Slide 8: </strong> 8 TEACHING WITH POWERPOINT Randy Graff, PhD 352-&gt;273-&gt;5051 </p><p><strong>Slide 9: </strong> Benefits 9 Easy Easy to technology update Neat and Portable clean </p><p><strong>Slide 10: </strong> Obstacles 10 Overloaded with details Can discourage interaction Can encourage passivity </p><p><strong>Slide 11: </strong> Teaching with PowerPoint 11 Active lecturing Effective handouts Learning strategies Assessment techniques Pedagogy </p><p><strong>Slide 12: </strong> Active Lecturing – show, not tell 12 Preparation Beginning Middle End </p><p><strong>Slide 13: </strong> Active Lecturing - Preparation 13 Preview content and come prepared Encourage note Make taking Sets expectations available before class Provide skeletal Discourage coming to outline class Rehash what is on slides Time to build Time to be effective </p><p><strong>Slide 14: </strong> Active Lecturing - Preparation 14 University Rehab Question Association Some of the What are some extracurricular methods to activities of this encourage group includes: children to • achieve healthier • weights • </p><p><strong>Slide 15: </strong> Active Lecturing - Beginning 15 Think Plan Think-Pair-Share •Questions What are some methods to •Transportation encourage •ADA Guidelines children to •Local Resources achieve healthier weights Bring students into the sphere of your topic Connect what they already know to new concepts </p><p><strong>Slide 16: </strong> Active Lecturing - Beginning 16 Brainstorming Show slide with statement or question Partner up and brainstorm things that relate Write list, concept map, narrative </p><p><strong>Slide 17: </strong> Active Lecturing - Middle 17 Breathe People can’t really attend to lectures beyond 15 minutes without losing focus and mind wandering </p><p><strong>Slide 18: </strong> Active Lecturing - Middle 18 • Turn to a neighbor • Turn to a partner and and come up with a compare notes difficult question • Focus on most • Collect verbally or on important and paper to repurpose confusing points on practice exams or lectures Stump your Note check partner Gives students investment in course content </p><p><strong>Slide 19: </strong> Active Lecturing - End 19 How was our Muddiest Point Final Question? plan? •Questions •Transportation •ADA Guidelines •Local Resources </p><p><strong>Slide 20: </strong>20 </p><p><strong>Slide 21: </strong> seamstress : cloth :: shoemaker 21 : 1-&gt; wood 80% 2-&gt; leather 3-&gt; steel 4-&gt; paper 20% 0% 0% 1 2 3 4 </p><p><strong>Slide 22: </strong> About how long can people attend to a lecture before they start tuning 22 out? 20% 1-&gt; Five minutes 80% 2-&gt; Fifteen Minutes 0% 3-&gt; Thirty Minutes 0% 4-&gt; One hour </p><p><strong>Slide 23: </strong> Breathe 23 </p><p><strong>Slide 24: </strong> 24 PRESENTATION GUIDELINES </p><p><strong>Slide 25: </strong> Spot the error 25 Plan •New content •Quiz •Questions from last time? •Questions about homework? •Group work •Goals for today </p><p><strong>Slide 26: </strong> Guidelines 26  Keep to the main purpose  One idea per slide  Think about the output  Consistent layout  Easy to read  6 by 6 rule </p><p><strong>Slide 27: </strong> Clean Font 27 14 point text 16 point text 18 point text 20 point text 24 point text 28 point text 32 point text 36 point text Times Roman is a serif font-&gt; Ariel is a sans serif font-&gt; </p><p><strong>Slide 28: </strong> Considerations 28 Goals Audience Time Location Need to To Present Lighting Know Nice to For Prepare Technology Know With Before and After </p><p><strong>Slide 29: </strong> Think about size 29 </p><p><strong>Slide 30: </strong> Think about lighting 30 </p><p><strong>Slide 31: </strong> Think about where your audience sits 31 </p><p><strong>Slide 32: </strong> Think about size Think about where your audience sits 32 </p><p><strong>Slide 33: </strong> Think about size Think about where you will stand or sit 33 </p><p><strong>Slide 34: </strong> Where is the technology in the Think about size room? 34 </p><p><strong>Slide 35: </strong> Color Choices 35 </p><p><strong>Slide 36: </strong> Poll4-&gt;co Text your choice to m 99503 36 </p><p><strong>Slide 37: </strong> Better Color Choices 37 </p><p><strong>Slide 38: </strong> Spot the error 38 1-&gt; Active lecturing 2-&gt; Effective handouts 3-&gt; Learning strategies 4-&gt; Assessment techniques 5-&gt; Pedagogy 6-&gt; Brainstorming 7-&gt; Show slide with statement or question 8-&gt; Partner up and brainstorm things that relate 9-&gt; Write list, concept map, narrative </p><p><strong>Slide 39: </strong> Spot the error 39 1-&gt; No error 25% 2-&gt; No contrast, too many lines 25% 3-&gt; No graphics 25% 4-&gt; No SmartArt 25% </p><p><strong>Slide 40: </strong> Consistent Colors 40 kuler-&gt;adobe-&gt;com </p><p><strong>Slide 41: </strong> Consistent Images 41 labs-&gt;ideeinc-&gt;co m </p><p><strong>Slide 42: </strong> Templates 42 http://training-&gt;health-&gt;ufl-&gt;edu/ppt-&gt;as px http://identity-&gt;ufl-&gt;ed u </p><p><strong>Slide 43: </strong> Consistent Colors 43 Identity-&gt;ufl-&gt;edu </p><p><strong>Slide 44: </strong> HSV 15 200 245 RGB 245 102 53 Web #F56635 HSV 212 255 137 RGB 0 63 137 Web #003F89 HSV 209 134 183 RGB 87 137 183 Web #5789B7 HSV 26 195 255 RGB 225 127 53 Web #E17F35 HSV 34 94 203 RGB 203 170 128 Web #CBAA80 HSV 102 24 215 RGB 201 215 195 Web #C9D7C3 HSV 42 57 255 RGB 255 238 198 Web #FFEEC6 HSV 200 9 167 RGB 161 165 167 Web #A1A5A7 HSV 98 155 128 RGB 79 128 50 Web #4F8032 HSV 273 159 98 RGB 71 37 98 Web #472562 HSV 36 233 255 RGB 255 162 22 Web #FFA216 HSV 350 255 212 RGB 212 0 35 44 Web #D40023 </p><p><strong>Slide 45: </strong> Consistent Colors 45 </p><p><strong>Slide 46: </strong> UF Word mark 46 http://identity-&gt;ufl-&gt;edu </p><p><strong>Slide 47: </strong> www-&gt;flickr-&gt;com 47 </p><p><strong>Slide 48: </strong> • Truly free Images • Royalty free 48  Google Images – http://images-&gt;google-&gt;com  UF IFAS - http://ics-&gt;ifas-&gt;ufl-&gt;edu/pictures/  UF UREL - http://photos-&gt;urel-&gt;ufl-&gt;edu/  Flickr - http://www-&gt;flickr-&gt;com/  Photobucket - http://photobucket-&gt;com/  Stoxk-&gt;xchng - http://www-&gt;sxc-&gt;hu/  IstockPhoto – http://www-&gt;istockphoto-&gt;com </p><p><strong>Slide 49: </strong> Poll4-&gt;co Text your choice to m 99503 49 </p><p><strong>Slide 50: </strong>50 </p><p><strong>Slide 51: </strong>51 </p><p><strong>Slide 52: </strong>52 </p><p><strong>Slide 53: </strong> www-&gt;theorangegrove-&gt;o rg 53 </p><p><strong>Slide 54: </strong> www-&gt;merlot-&gt;org 54 </p><p><strong>Slide 55: </strong>55 </p><p><strong>Slide 56: </strong>56 Notes Slide Tools Slide Nav </p><p><strong>Slide 57: </strong>57 </p><p><strong>Slide 58: </strong> 58 Using Animation and SmartArt </p><p><strong>Slide 59: </strong>59 </p><p><strong>Slide 60: </strong> Overview 60  What is online learning  Advantages  Preparing  Challenges  Structure  Community  Assessment </p><p><strong>Slide 61: </strong> Advantages Learning  Student centered learning  Collaborative learning  Experiential learning  Easy access to resources  Accessible for non traditional students  Draws on student interest 40 61 </p><p><strong>Slide 62: </strong> Overview 62  What is online learning  Advantages  Preparing  Challenges  Structure  Community  Assessment </p><p><strong>Slide 63: </strong> SmartArt 63 What is online learning Advantages Preparing Challenges Structure Community Assessment </p><p><strong>Slide 64: </strong> SmartArt 64 </p><p><strong>Slide 65: </strong> SmartArt 65 What is online Assessment learning Community Advantages Structure Preparing Challenges </p><p><strong>Slide 66: </strong> What is online learning? 66 Web Traditional Blended/Hybrid Online Facilitated </p><p><strong>Slide 67: </strong>67 </p><p><strong>Slide 68: </strong> Spot the error 68 </p><p><strong>Slide 69: </strong> Spot the error 69 1-&gt; No error 2-&gt; No SmartArt 3-&gt; Text too small </p><p><strong>Slide 70: </strong> Day 1 70  Patient is admitted to the ICU with respiratory failure:  Respiratory rate 28 breaths/min, peripheral oxygen saturation 95% (6 L oxygen/min via mask)  He has been hospitalised for 4 weeks because of haemophagocytic syndrome (diagnosis by bone marrow smear)  Received therapy:  HLH4 protocol (etoposide, dexamethasone, cyclosporin A)  History of multiple periods of fever of unknown origin </p><p><strong>Slide 71: </strong> Today Is Patient is admitted to the ICU with respiratory failure: Day 1 Respiratory Rate Patient History 28 breaths/min Peripheral O2 saturation He has been hospitalised for 4 95% weeks because of (6 L oxygen/min via mask) haemophagocytic syndrome (diagnosis by bone marrow Received therapy smear) HLH4 protocol History of multiple periods of (etoposide, fever of unknown origin dexamethasone, cyclosporin A) 71 </p><p><strong>Slide 72: </strong> Today Is Patient is still in ICU with respiratory distress: Day 2 Respiratory Rate Treatment Plan 44 breaths/min Peripheral O2 saturation 85% (6 L oxygen/min via mask) Therapy 72 </p><p><strong>Slide 73: </strong> What is Substance Abuse? 73  According to WHO1  “…the harmful or hazardous use of psychoactive substances, including alcohol and illicit drugs”  Beliefs2  Bigdeal?  Moral weakness or character defect? </p><p><strong>Slide 74: </strong> What is Substance Abuse? …the harmful or hazardous use Big deal? of psychoactive substances, Moral weakness or including alcohol and illicit character defect? drugs-&gt; According to WHO1 Beliefs2 74 </p><p><strong>Slide 75: </strong> Chest X-ray 4 weeks prior to 75 ICU admission </p><p><strong>Slide 76: </strong>Chest X-Ray 4 weeks prior to ICU admission 76 </p><p><strong>Slide 77: </strong> Hyperlink Hyperlink 77 </p><p><strong>Slide 78: </strong>78 </p><p><strong>Slide 79: </strong> 79 COLLABORATIVE WORK ENVIRONMENTS </p><p><strong>Slide 80: </strong>80 Wiki Documents Live www-&gt;deskaway-&gt;com milestoneplanner-&gt;com </p><p><strong>Slide 81: </strong>81 </p><p><strong>Slide 82: </strong>82 </p><p><strong>Slide 83: </strong>83 </p><p><strong>Slide 84: </strong>84 </p><p><strong>Slide 85: </strong>85 </p><p><strong>Slide 86: </strong> Google docs – main screen 86 </p><p><strong>Slide 87: </strong> Google docs – show revisions 87 </p><p><strong>Slide 88: </strong>88 </p><p><strong>Slide 89: </strong> Synchronous collaboration 89 </p><p><strong>Slide 90: </strong>90 </p><p><strong>Slide 91: </strong>91 uf-&gt;deskaway-&gt;com https://milestoneplanner-&gt;com/app </p><p><strong>Slide 92: </strong> Briefly Annotated Resource List http://creativecommons-&gt;org Information about appropriate reuse of content found on the web http://docs-&gt;google-&gt;com Asynchronous collaborative document management http://identity-&gt;ufl-&gt;edu UF source for official wordmarks and colors http://kuler-&gt;adobe-&gt;com Color theme creator http://labs-&gt;ideeinc-&gt;com Search for images based on color http://milestoneplanner-&gt;com Simple timeline creation http://training-&gt;health-&gt;ufl-&gt;edu/ppt-&gt;aspx PowerPoint templates http://vischeck-&gt;com See what color impaired people see http://wave-&gt;google-&gt;com Synchronous document creation http://www-&gt;deskaway-&gt;com Project collaboration http://www-&gt;flickr-&gt;com Image search http://www-&gt;merlot-&gt;org Educational multimedia repository http://www-&gt;pbworks-&gt;com Wiki tool for collaborative work http://www-&gt;presentationzen-&gt;com Presentation advice http://www-&gt;theorangegrove-&gt;org Educational multimedia repository http://www-&gt;polleverywhere-&gt;com Live audience polling http://poll4-&gt;com Small webpage for live polling 92 </p><p><strong>Slide 93: </strong> How was our plan? •Classroom Response •Effective Presentations •Guidelines •Animation •Collaboration 93 </p><p><strong>Slide 94: </strong> Muddiest Point 94 </p><p><strong>Slide 95: </strong> Final Question? 95 </p><p><strong>Slide 96: </strong> Thank you for you time, patience, and attention! 96 </p>