Mobile Marketing Association Keynote - From Web Analytics to Customer Intelligence
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Mobile Marketing Association Keynote - From Web Analytics to Customer Intelligence

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Rand Schulman Keynote Mobile Marketing Association - SF 2013

Rand Schulman Keynote Mobile Marketing Association - SF 2013

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  • NEW STATS FROM CLICKZ / INCISIVE MEDIA RESEARCHOpower’s new product is more than an online report. It looks like a traditional web page, but it also feels a lot like a game. Users can complete challenges, participate in groups, and earn points and badges tied to real-world data. The goal is to keep users highly engaged, returning online to the app and participating, which then leads to real-world results.The use of items like leaderboards, badges, missions and levels is part of a trend called gamification that can be seen in a growing variety of industries and applications. It’s a trend that analysts claim will be in 25 percent of redesigned business processes by 2015,6 will grow to more than a $2.8 billion business by 2016, and will have 70 percent of Global 2000 businesses managing at least one “gamified” application or system by 2014.7Gamification is about taking the essence of games—fun, play, transparency, design and challenge—and applying it to real-world objectives rather than pure entertainment. In a business setting, that means designing solutions for everything from office tasks and training to marketing or direct customer interaction by combining the thinking of a business manager with the creativity and tools of a game designer.
  • Analytics is a baseline requirement across all phases. This internal effort is apart from periodic reporting, as it should be gauging in real time the performance of all paid, owned, and earned channels and allow for rapid iteration. Don’t expect this team to be able to see the forest through the trees as they peer in closely, so ensure the periodic reporting phase is included –you need both.Often companies jump to decide what they say, without analyzing what people want to hear, and that’s why the prior phase on analysis and reporting was a requirement. Companies can now develop a content strategy, but should understand how it changes and varies depending on the following variables: product type, geography, channel, screen, and source of information. Note that this spans many internal teams from corpcomm, brand marketing, media buying, social media team and all related agency partners.
  • We are now atyet another fork in the road. We have the opportunity to engage the consumer in entirely new and personalized ways. But we need to approach social marketing differently and harness its enormous potential for consumer intelligence.
  • GAMING COMPANIES ARE LEADING THE WAYZynga, the company behind Farmville and Fishville, is transforming the game industry. They are doing so by leveraging analytics to understand what engages their large user base and applying these findings to optimize their marketing campaigns and games for average revenue per user (ARPU).
  • Example: Gaia Online – a large online social network - achieved a 183% increase in ARPU in less than two months by applying a methodology similar to the Zynga approach. However, instead of built-in analytics, they leveraged Kontagent, a3rd party analytics platform, to gain similar insights.Gaia Online is an English-language, anime-themed social networking and forums-based website. Gaiaonline was founded in 2003.[1][2] but the name was changed to GaiaOnline.com in 2004 from go-gaia by its owner, Gaia Interactive. Gaia originally began as an anime linklist and eventually developed a small community,[2] but, following a statement by founder Derek Liu (username "Lanzer"), the website moved towards social gaming, and[3] eventually became a forum-based website.[4][5] Today, over a million posts are made daily[4] and it is visited by 7 million unique users each month[6] (with over 26 million total registered users). Gaia also won the 2007 Webware 100 award in the Community category.[7] In January 2011, the company won the Mashable Best User experience Award for 2010Ready or not, gamification is taking the business world by storm.For anyone unfamiliar with gamification, it's the application of game-like elements such as challenges, points, badges and levels to business and other nongame websites. An estimated 70 percent of the top 2,000 public companies in the world will have at least one gamified application by 2014, Stamford, Conn.-based research firm Gartner Inc. predicts.Patrick Salyer, CEO of gamification platform Gigya, believes there are two keys to success with gamification. "One is making sure that all gamified elements are inherently social," he says. "That is, don't restrict engagement to the internal site community. Award points for activities that reach users' social [networks] to bring in referral traffic."The other is to focus on rewarding activities that create value for your businesses. "For example, award points and badges for behaviors like subscribing to your company's newsletter, checking into your store or sending coupons to friends," Salyer says. "Gamification is not about haphazardly throwing badges across your site."Companies should weigh a number of factors before deciding whether to get into the gamification game. To help you decide, here are three case studies of major companies that benefited from incorporating gaming techniques into their sites and the lessons they learned along the way.USA Network's Club Psych fan loyalty site1. Club PsychNBC Universal's USA Network enlisted the help of gamification startup San Jose, Calif.-based Bunchball in July 2010 to increase engagement on the website for Psych, one of its TV shows. First, they launched a fan loyalty program called Club Psych that lets users win weekly prizes by completing different challenges.To enhance Club Psych, USA launched Psych Vision, a mobile app that let users access behind-the-scenes videos, play trivia games to earn points and unlock prizes, and chat with other fans, all while watching the show. With this tie-in, USA became one of the first marketers to offer a complete second screen experience, where fans could experience Psych on their TVs, as well as via mobile.Related: How Badgeville Is Gamifying the InternetAfter seeing a 130 percent jump in page views and a 40 percent increase in return visits to the Psych website with the Club Psych integration, USA decided to expand and created a social media mystery game called #HashTagKiller, which engages fans with puzzles, clues and Facebook chats with the show's actors. Jesse Redniss, senior vice president of digital, says #HashTagKiller has driven more than 95 million page views from 300,000 unique users since its launch in September 2011.Lesson learned: Turn visitors into brand ambassadors. A gamified social experience such as Club Psych can turn engaged fans into valuable brand ambassadors. Redniss notes that, "288,000 shares on Facebook's platform have provided us with over 38 million exposures of the 'Psych' brand to our users' friends and families." To reward those ambassadors, USA Network has given away prizes such as Nintendo Wii systems, Psych DVDs and character bobbleheads.The Verizon Insider game and online community2. Verizon InsiderVerizon Wireless wanted to increase the time users spend on its website and the amount of interaction with its content. In January, the company partnered with Gigya and digital agency Modal to develop a new version of its community hub Verizon Insider. Now, users can earn points and rewards for participating in contests, posting comments and promoting events.Is Gamification the Right Play for Your Business?While gamification may sound appealing to companies seeking greater customer engagement, they should be sure it's a winning proposition before investing time and money.Dustin DiTommaso, the experience design director at design studio Mad*Pow suggests that companies think seriously about why they're interested in gamification and how it could help them meet their business goals.Before gamifying, he says, a business should be able to answer these six questions with confidence:• What is the reason for gamifying your product or service?• How does it benefit users?• Will they enjoy it?• What are your business goals?• How do you get users to fulfill those business goals?• What actions do you want users to take?If you can provide solid answers to all the questions, gamification could be an effective component of your online efforts.Gamification can reward "behaviors consumers will naturally take on the site, such as sharing a blog that's relevant to their social networks or uploading a photo of themselves and their friends while attending a Verizon-sponsored concert," says Beth Tourek, Verizon's social media strategist. Verizon Insider also can be customized to match a user's interests or location.Verizon Insider seems to be paying off. "On average, users spend over 30 percent more time on-site with social login versus site login," Tourek says, "[And] the site has experienced more than 15 percent more page views."Lesson learned: Make it personal. Any gaming experience should aim to make users feel their experience is special. That's why Verizon Insider gives users customized badges to personalize their experience."The gamification element that excited us most was the opportunity to create customized badges for unique local programs," Tourek says. "For example, we're working on a 'Snow Bunny' badge for people who enter an upcoming sweepstakes to win a season pass at a Utah ski resort we sponsor."The Samsung Nation gaming hub3. Samsung NationKorean electronics giant Samsung launched its social loyalty program, Samsung Nation, in November to target the millions of fans who were already engaging with its corporate website. "We want to show them that we appreciate their loyalty and interest," says Esteban Contreras, social media marketing manager for Samsung Electronics America. Samsung worked with Menlo Park, Calif.-based gamification company Badgeville to build Samsung Nation, where users earn badges for completing activities such as writing reviews, watching videos and participating in forums. Because Samsung.com already gets tens of millions of visits per year, the company didn't need to do much outside promotion. Instead, it has focused on explaining the benefits of its gaming program on its site.Related: One Young Entrepreneur's Million-Dollar Idea in Mobile GamingOne of Samsung's gamification goals was increasing engagement and the number of product reviews. So far, results have been encouraging, with user behavior such as product reviews increasing "hundreds of percent per month," according to Badgeville.Lesson learned: Focus on engaged users. Instead of trying to reach a new audience, Contreras encourages businesses to focus on the people already engaging with their brands and figure out whether those highly engaged and passionate customers would value a social loyalty program. For Samsung, that meant learning how fans of Samsung.com were already using the site and how it could be made even more appealing.Read more stories about: Games, Online businesses, Gamification 
  • Gamification is about taking the essence of games—fun, play, transparency, design and challenge—and applying it to real-world objectives rather than pure entertainment. In a business setting, that means designing solutions for everything from office tasks and training to marketing or direct customer interaction by combining the thinking of a business manager with the creativity and tools of a game designer.Opower is not alone in the attempt to improve energy efficiency with a new approach. “We’re all about the game mechanics,” says Yoav Lurie, CEO of Simple Energy, whose social game elements and data analytics combine with real-world prizes.8 Lurie’s company participated in an energy efficiency program piloted by San Diego Gas & Electric that succeeded in more than doubling energy savings among participating residential customers during a three-month period.9Of course, engaging customers and employees with game thinking and mechanics can extend far beyond looking at new ways to encourage energy efficiency. Industries and businesses of all types are seeing the benefit of applying these techniques. Content and media companies have seen online customer interactions increase 30–40 percent.10, 11 Health care insurance providers such as Aetna and Kaiser Permanente are encouraging customers to engage in health care/wellness more regularly, with Aetna seeing increases of 50 percent in healthy actions.12, 13 And restaurants using these strategies are seeing gains in both sales and server gratuitiesReady or not, gamification is taking the business world by storm.For anyone unfamiliar with gamification, it's the application of game-like elements such as challenges, points, badges and levels to business and other nongame websites. An estimated 70 percent of the top 2,000 public companies in the world will have at least one gamified application by 2014, Stamford, Conn.-based research firm Gartner Inc. predicts.Patrick Salyer, CEO of gamification platform Gigya, believes there are two keys to success with gamification. "One is making sure that all gamified elements are inherently social," he says. "That is, don't restrict engagement to the internal site community. Award points for activities that reach users' social [networks] to bring in referral traffic."The other is to focus on rewarding activities that create value for your businesses. "For example, award points and badges for behaviors like subscribing to your company's newsletter, checking into your store or sending coupons to friends," Salyer says. "Gamification is not about haphazardly throwing badges across your site."Companies should weigh a number of factors before deciding whether to get into the gamification game. To help you decide, here are three case studies of major companies that benefited from incorporating gaming techniques into their sites and the lessons they learned along the way.USA Network's Club Psych fan loyalty site1. Club PsychNBC Universal's USA Network enlisted the help of gamification startup San Jose, Calif.-based Bunchball in July 2010 to increase engagement on the website for Psych, one of its TV shows. First, they launched a fan loyalty program called Club Psych that lets users win weekly prizes by completing different challenges.To enhance Club Psych, USA launched Psych Vision, a mobile app that let users access behind-the-scenes videos, play trivia games to earn points and unlock prizes, and chat with other fans, all while watching the show. With this tie-in, USA became one of the first marketers to offer a complete second screen experience, where fans could experience Psych on their TVs, as well as via mobile.Related: How Badgeville Is Gamifying the InternetAfter seeing a 130 percent jump in page views and a 40 percent increase in return visits to the Psych website with the Club Psych integration, USA decided to expand and created a social media mystery game called #HashTagKiller, which engages fans with puzzles, clues and Facebook chats with the show's actors. Jesse Redniss, senior vice president of digital, says #HashTagKiller has driven more than 95 million page views from 300,000 unique users since its launch in September 2011.Lesson learned: Turn visitors into brand ambassadors. A gamified social experience such as Club Psych can turn engaged fans into valuable brand ambassadors. Redniss notes that, "288,000 shares on Facebook's platform have provided us with over 38 million exposures of the 'Psych' brand to our users' friends and families." To reward those ambassadors, USA Network has given away prizes such as Nintendo Wii systems, Psych DVDs and character bobbleheads.The Verizon Insider game and online community2. Verizon InsiderVerizon Wireless wanted to increase the time users spend on its website and the amount of interaction with its content. In January, the company partnered with Gigya and digital agency Modal to develop a new version of its community hub Verizon Insider. Now, users can earn points and rewards for participating in contests, posting comments and promoting events.Is Gamification the Right Play for Your Business?While gamification may sound appealing to companies seeking greater customer engagement, they should be sure it's a winning proposition before investing time and money.Dustin DiTommaso, the experience design director at design studio Mad*Pow suggests that companies think seriously about why they're interested in gamification and how it could help them meet their business goals.Before gamifying, he says, a business should be able to answer these six questions with confidence:• What is the reason for gamifying your product or service?• How does it benefit users?• Will they enjoy it?• What are your business goals?• How do you get users to fulfill those business goals?• What actions do you want users to take?If you can provide solid answers to all the questions, gamification could be an effective component of your online efforts.Gamification can reward "behaviors consumers will naturally take on the site, such as sharing a blog that's relevant to their social networks or uploading a photo of themselves and their friends while attending a Verizon-sponsored concert," says Beth Tourek, Verizon's social media strategist. Verizon Insider also can be customized to match a user's interests or location.Verizon Insider seems to be paying off. "On average, users spend over 30 percent more time on-site with social login versus site login," Tourek says, "[And] the site has experienced more than 15 percent more page views."Lesson learned: Make it personal. Any gaming experience should aim to make users feel their experience is special. That's why Verizon Insider gives users customized badges to personalize their experience."The gamification element that excited us most was the opportunity to create customized badges for unique local programs," Tourek says. "For example, we're working on a 'Snow Bunny' badge for people who enter an upcoming sweepstakes to win a season pass at a Utah ski resort we sponsor."The Samsung Nation gaming hub3. Samsung NationKorean electronics giant Samsung launched its social loyalty program, Samsung Nation, in November to target the millions of fans who were already engaging with its corporate website. "We want to show them that we appreciate their loyalty and interest," says Esteban Contreras, social media marketing manager for Samsung Electronics America. Samsung worked with Menlo Park, Calif.-based gamification company Badgeville to build Samsung Nation, where users earn badges for completing activities such as writing reviews, watching videos and participating in forums. Because Samsung.com already gets tens of millions of visits per year, the company didn't need to do much outside promotion. Instead, it has focused on explaining the benefits of its gaming program on its site.Related: One Young Entrepreneur's Million-Dollar Idea in Mobile GamingOne of Samsung's gamification goals was increasing engagement and the number of product reviews. So far, results have been encouraging, with user behavior such as product reviews increasing "hundreds of percent per month," according to Badgeville.Lesson learned: Focus on engaged users. Instead of trying to reach a new audience, Contreras encourages businesses to focus on the people already engaging with their brands and figure out whether those highly engaged and passionate customers would value a social loyalty program. For Samsung, that meant learning how fans of Samsung.com were already using the site and how it could be made even more appealing.Read more stories about: Games, Online businesses, Gamification
  • SAPPs an MAPPs enable brands to target an engage their most valuable user segments. We can now measure and optimize the cost and value of user engagement via SAPPs and MAPPs …not just in single session but through multiple sessions - through the lifetime of the engagement. This is a new way to optimize Life Time Value (LTV)!
  • Can this just be the bullets and move everything else to talking point? Designing your solutionHow does your design maintain authenticity? Don’t turn real-world tasks into frivolous activities; a system can still be beautiful and metaphorical while maintaining clarity about the benefits it provides to users or users provide to other participants. In addition, provide a win condition for all players. No one wants to perpetually be at the bottom of a scoreboard; demonstrate progress toward mastery for your users. The goal is not to “game” or manipulate your target audiences, but rather to mesh behavioral science with social technologies to increase the interaction and engagement with audiences.Who should help? Design teams need to be able to address the overall organizational goals, measurement and analytics needs, design of incentives, and information technology considerations. Your effort could benefit from a multi-disciplinary team that includes business-line strategists and managers, along with social scientists, marketers, game designers, programmers and those with data analytics expertise.How do I track the behavioral data? Technology providers offering gamification platforms or solutions typically make the tracking and feedback of behavior easy. But you don’t have to use vendors. You can track behavior without custom technology through manual processes if you have the resources; just consider if you are still able to provide rapid feedback. If you decide to leverage a vendor, first ask about previous results, and try to evaluate their ability to scale.Measuring results and improving processHow will you track effectiveness? It’s not enough to just capture data; you need to be prepared for meaningful analysis of the results. Return on investment assumptions should be thought of beyond simple project dollars spent. Develop formulas to measure the long-term value of more engaged or loyal customers or employees. The relationship of engagement to loyalty and ultimate profit (or improved performance) may be a cause-and-effect sequence.What is your plan for updating and creating new content? An important lesson from the gaming industry is that once a game is released, the work is not done. Because data are continuously gathered, the organization can learn and adapt as needed. Furthermore, users may eventually tire of a system or run out of tasks or challenges to complete. Frequent addition of new content may keep users engaged for a longer period of time. Piloting applications can be a low-cost and low-risk method to begin to understand how to use gamification to encourage engagement and change behaviors. From there, leaders can scale initiatives into new business areas or make existing initiatives larger in scope.

Mobile Marketing Association Keynote - From Web Analytics to Customer Intelligence Mobile Marketing Association Keynote - From Web Analytics to Customer Intelligence Presentation Transcript

  • Winning the Mobile Game A Breakfast Workshop Sponsored by KontagentMobile Marketing Association
  • AGENDA • 7:30 AM - 7:45 AM Introductions • 7:45 AM - 8:15 AM Evolution of analytics • 8:15 AM - 8:55 AM: PANEL What you can learn from mobile gamers • 8:55 AM - 9: 00 AM: Questions and closing commentsMobile Marketing Association
  • Speakers • Dan Kimball, Chief Marketing Officer – Kontagent • Rand Schulman, Co-Founder/ Emeritus Director - Digital Analytics Association; Analytics Executive • Josh Williams, President – Kontagent • Rob Carroll, Chief Mobile Officer – 5th Planet GamesMobile Marketing Association
  • The Evolved Customer From Web Analytics to Mobile Intelligence Rand SchulmanMobile Marketing Association
  • Mobile Marketing Today is Like Web Marketing in 1997 – And We Know What Happened! • According to a soon to be released Incisive Media- ClickZ / Efectyv Marketing survey of almost 250k readers – • Good news - 93% of the responses* use Web Analytics WOW! • Mixed news - yet few optimize Mobile and Cross Channel Analytics and less than 30% have agreed with objectives *aprox 980Mobile Marketing Association
  • Why Now? New Breakthroughs Create New Challenges – Analytics Critical • Offline Direct Marketing Insights Drove Web Analytic Developments in the Mid 1990 • Today Technology enablers – Big Data / Cloud / CPU / Bandwidth advancements - real-time empirical data • Converged Workflow People - Digital Marketing - becoming more like Direct Marketing creating a new role definition for the “Marketer” • Gamers taught us that APP Engagement is Key – – Law of Large numbers means / rapid A/B/M testing – Optimization – Greater engagement / greater conversion to intentMobile Marketing Association
  • THINKDIFFERENT.ly7
  • Brands are becoming more customer-centric. Mobile is at the center of this relationship. 2Mobile Marketing Association
  • But…Brands need customer insights to build meaningful, memorable and valuable lifetime experiences. Think Amazon… 3Mobile Marketing Association
  • Creativity without conversion = Zero •Identify your Business Goal just like offline and Internet •Monitor, measure and maximize – Become a Content Engineer 4Mobile Marketing Association
  • How Do You Define Customer Value and Conversions? Customer Customer Customer Engagement Monetization Profitability - User Experience - Revenue - Acquisition Costs - Retention - Lifetime Value vs Lifetime Value - Loyalty - App Efficiency Metrics for Success: Metrics for Success: Metrics for Success: Retention, Stickiness, Funnel Revenue, Revenue/Customer, Cost/Install, Profit/Install, Conversions, Event Timeline Lifetime Value Revenue/Customer, Flows LTV/Customer … And How Do You Plan to Measure Success? 1Mobile Marketing Association 6
  • “We’re an analytics company masquerading as a games company.” Ken Rudin Vice President, Analytics & Platform Services Source: WSJ 12Mobile Marketing Association
  • Greater APP Engagement - 183% Increase in ARPU* in less than Two Months for Gaia** • How effective are my ads in reach? • What is the quality & age of users from different countries? • What is my campaign performance by partner and country tier? • How are my users performing APP post install? *Average revenue per user ** 1 million post per day, 7 million Unique per mo, 26 million reg. users LTV Dashboard www.kontagent.comMobile Marketing Association
  • Gamification: Beyond Gamers – A Rush Towards Customer Engagement • Consumer – Verizon seeing increase of 30% time on site time (goal increase revenue, decrease cost) – San Diego Power and Gas and OpsPower (decrease cost) – Samsung – Increase of 200% per month site user engagement (reviews/revenue) • Content & Media companies have seen 30-40%* increase in Reader interactions (goal - increase revenue) – USA Networks 130% increase Page Views 40% Return Visitors • Health care – Aetna / Kaiser seeing 50%* increase in “healthy actions” (goal – decrease in cost) • * Deloitte Review The Engagement Economy 2012Mobile Marketing Association
  • Mobile - Part of “Omni Channel” Metrics - The ROI of Mobile • Measure LTV • Measure viral factor and channel attribution - • Understand Correlation and Causality • Test and OptimizeMobile Marketing Association
  • In Summary: What Should You Do Now? • You need applications that will allow you to Collect/Track Behavioral data • Measure Results and Optimize process – not enough to just capture data; you need to be prepared for meaningful analysis of the results. Return on investment assumptions should be thought of beyond simple project dollars spent. Develop formulas to measure the long-term value of more engaged or loyal customers across new channels – MAPPS, SAPPS and APPS • Who/How? The New Marketer as The Content Engineer – a multi-disciplinary team that includes business-line strategists and managers, along with social scientists, marketers, game designers, programmers and those with data analytics expertiseMobile Marketing Association
  • Thank you rschulman@pacific.eduMobile Marketing Association
  • AGENDA • 7:30 AM - 7:45 AM Introductions • 7:45 AM - 8:15 AM Evolution of analytics • 8:15 AM - 8:55 AM: PANEL What you can learn from mobile gamers • 8:55 AM - 9: 00 AM: Questions and closing commentsMobile Marketing Association
  • Speakers • Dan Kimball, Chief Marketing Officer – Kontagent • Josh Williams, President – Kontagent • Rob Carroll, Chief Mobile Officer – 5th Planet GamesMobile Marketing Association
  • Q&AMobile Marketing Association