Why a Local Economic Profile?<br />Understand the Local Economy<br />The <br />LED Process<br />
What was our initial assessement of the current economic situation in Metro Naga?<br />UNEVEN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT<br />...
What is our goal for development?<br />UNEVEN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT<br />BALANCED<br />
What are our assumptions or starting points before a strategic development plan can be formulated?<br />UNEVEN GROWTH AND ...
Naga City and Pili as growth poles</li></ul>2. Existence of a “core/pole-periphery” phenomenon<br /><ul><li>Gaps in econom...
How do we “Tool-Up” or get ready for this type of development?<br />Do  imbalances exist? <br />In what forms?<br /><ul><l...
T-LED Database for the MNDC<br />Do  imbalances exist? <br />In what forms?<br /><ul><li> Validate our assumptions</li></u...
T-LED Database for the MNDC<br />What data did we focus on?<br />Other  Economy and Tourism-Related Information<br />Speci...
T-LED Database for the MNDC<br />Where did we get the data?<br />DILG’s Local Governance Performance Management System<br ...
processed indices</li></ul>MNDC Member Survey<br /><ul><li>additional data
perceptions/ self-ratings</li></li></ul><li>How much data did we gather?<br /><ul><li>175 sets of  statistics from the LGU...
45 indicators from the LGPMS database
DILG profiles</li></li></ul><li>How much data did we gather?<br />Consolidated into the Database of more than 120 pages<br />
But just some key results…<br />The Results!<br />
Do “core areas” exist?<br />YES and NO!<br />NOT ALL ADVANTAGES BELONG TO WHAT WE CONSIDER THE “ECONOMIC GROWTH POLES”<br />
But first,<br />How did the “economic growth centers” show up in the data?<br />TAKE SOME EXAMPLES …<br />
What are the other data that show the economic gaps?<br />Other Data Manifesting Economic Heterogenity and Differentials b...
  Number of Public Utility Vehicles [2]
  Employment by Economic Sector  [3]
  Dependence on Primary Sector Production [3]
  Profiles of Distribution of Enterprises by Capitalization [3]
  Types of Business Enterprises  [3]</li></li></ul><li>Some data showing the “gaps”…<br />
NUMBER OF BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENTS<br />
ESTIMATED TOTAL CAPITALIZATION OF BUSINESS ENTERPRISES<br />
EXAMPLES OF DISTRIBUTION OF BUSINESSES BY CAPITALIZATION OF LGUS<br />
Number of  Registered and Estimated Number of Unregistered Business Enterprises<br />
Employment Distribution by Sector and Sex<br />For LGUs providing sex-disaggregated data<br />
NAGA<br />NAGA<br />
How about the other data areas?<br />THE KEY WORD IS<br />DIVERSITY<br />
T-LED Database for the MNDC<br />Mountain, Forest Ecosystems<br />Coastal Zones<br />River Systems, <br />Lowland Areas<br...
  Vulnerability of Access (Transportation and Communication) [ 2]
  Economic Production [ 3]</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Special Culture and Heritage</li></ul>T-LED Database for the MNDC<br ...
 Existing and Potential Tourism  Products and Services [5]
 Products and Services</li></li></ul><li>
T-LED Database for the MNDC<br /><ul><li> Basics [1]</li></li></ul><li>What does this mean?<br /><ul><li>The basic ingredi...
There are opportunities for sharing effective technologies, practices, capacities and resourcesto transform these for the ...
What are the other findings?<br /><ul><li>Specific needs have been manifested
 Can be addressed by governance environment support</li></li></ul><li>POSSIBLE AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT:<br /><ul><li>Ecosyst...
Revenue Generation
Local Legislation
Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion</li></li></ul><li>POSSIBLE AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT:<br /><ul><li>Ecosystem...
Revenue Generation
Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion
Support to Housing and Basic Utilities</li></li></ul><li>POSSIBLE AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT:<br /><ul><li>Ecosystems Management
Revenue Generation
Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion
Local Legislation</li></li></ul><li>POSSIBLE AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT:<br /><ul><li>Ecosystems Management
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

MNDC Local Economic Profile - Analysis

880 views

Published on

Analysis of the draft Local Economic Profile of the Metro Naga Development Council (MNDC), covering Naga City and 13 municipalities in Camarines Sur. The presentation focuses on validating MNDC's initial assumptions about tourism as a strategy for local economic development in the area. The presentation was made by Ms. Alaine Fornoles and Mr. Renato Fornoles based on the draft LEP that they prepared for MNDC, through the assistance of the Local Governance Support Program for Local Economic Development (LED). The presentation was done to validate MNDC's choice of industry to focus on for LED. Also to provide the starting point for a more detailed analysis of this focus industry.

Published in: Business, Technology
1 Comment
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Excellent!!! Bottom line though, is you need those hard facts or basic information to make the analysis in the charts and graphs real and useful for planning realistically what to do to get the economy going.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
880
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
1
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Part of the prescribed LED processrequired as inputs for the next step of Preparing the LED StrategyThere were, however, already some basic assumptions about the ecnomic structure of the MNDC that was used as a “hypothesis” for the proposal for a tourism-led economic development strategy.So, this profile also serves a purpose of validating this assumption.
  • It has to be accepted that there are certain areas in Metro Naga that are economically ahead of other LGUs. But despite the benefits of tourism, the economic situation in the Metro Naga remains uneven. Its benefits seem flow only in certain areas, notably Pili and Naga City.ma otot
  • Our objective is to spread these benefits of tourism to the other LGUs of Metro Naga, to attain a more balanced and inclusive growth and development.
  • What are our starting points for this drive towards a balanced growth?First, we have to accept the presence of tourism as a “growth engine” that brings economic benefits to the area,And that today, Pili and Naga City may be considered the “growth poles” that absorb most of these benefits.Secondly, gaps between these growth poles and the other areas in the “peripheries” or surrounding LGUs, exist.And thirdly, and most importantly, there are opportunities for all the other LGUs to “hitch on” the growth engine to receive more of its benefits.
  • How do we go about getting ready for this type of development?There are three basic stages -First, we validate our assumptions by generating a database, to Prove the existence of the core-periphery situation, And, find out the areas where T-LED can be effective in stimulating the balanced and inclusive growth targetsThen, using these information, we develop an overall strategic plan or roadmap,And based on this, we can then formulate specific action plans or proposals for projects and activities within Metro Naga or LGUs.What have we done so far?
  • How do we go about getting ready for this type of development?There are three basic stages -First, we validate our assumptions by generating a database, to Prove the existence of the core-periphery situation, And, find out the areas where T-LED can be effective in stimulating the balanced and inclusive growth targetsThen, using these information, we develop an overall strategic plan or roadmap,And based on this, we can then formulate specific action plans or proposals for projects and activities within Metro Naga or LGUs.What have we done so far?
  • We focused our data gathering to those that were:Related to tourism and development, based on our concept of tourismSome of these information were already ready and processed as indicatorsAnd because of our scope of study, not all the information about LGUs were collected
  • Where did we get the information?Most helpful was the DILG’s database from its Local Governance Performance Management System, which provided standardized profiles and performance indicatorsAnd, from a survey from the MNDC LGU members. And, at this point, we must acknowledge all LGUs who submitted their survey forms promptly and with the most information that they can provide, such as xxxx. Thank you for your cooperation.
  • During the data gathering, not all LGUs sumbitted complete information.But despite this, we were able to collect aboutThere are about 175 sets of data from the LGU survey,and 45 indicators from the LGPMS database plus the basic LGU profile that were collected,
  • All these were summarized into more than 125 pages of the report preliminary report.This report can be made available to those interested from the MNDC.So, considering all the data involved,I think what you would be interested in would be the significant findings, instead of the contents of the database itself.
  • So, with your permission, let us go directly to just the key results.The data generated were substantial, and is a bit overwhelming. Even with “data gaps”, the results already reveal important information that can be used in preparing for the next steps in our project.What are the key findings so far?
  • What are the key findings so far?Have we validated or proved our “theory” of the existence of “growth poles”?Categorically,Yes. Gaps and differences do exist between the so-called growth poles and their peripheries.However, we can also add:No – not all the advantages belong to the “core”Why?
  • First, let us consider the obvious, and try to discover why is there so much economic growth in the “core” areas?The answer is their access to the agents of the “transformation of natural resources”There is so much advantage in sheer numbers alone, of the following fundamental “transforming agents” offinancial institutions, and commercial and trading centersAnd, because of this, economic and social support structures also bloomed to create an ever-growing feedback mechanism – for instance - transportation ( to keep onmoving resources), communication ( for keeping information flowing), and education (for upgrading the capacities of human resources)
  • Take for example just some of the information from the database:Naga has an overwhelming advantage in Revenue Collection.In private enterprises, it lords over the other LGUs in the number of business establishments, and also in the number of enterprises with capitalization of more than 5 million.In another indicator of development – transportation facilities, Naga City has about a thousand more tricycles than the average LGU in the peripheral areas.More of such data in the study proves the nature of Naga City as the “core growth center of Metro Naga”.
  • But what about the other areas? Should we consider them as “poor”?Not at all.
  • The area is blessed with a wide variety of ecosytems which provide the people with a wide range of resources for economic production, and tourism potentials.Natural resource endowments are widely distributed. There are LGUs that enjoy the advantages of access to mountain and forest ecosystems, which is good for eco-tourismThere are areas that have pristine and abundant coastlinesAnd most have access to a river system that provides abundance, but unfortunately, also flooding.
  • The area is blessed with a wide variety of ecosytems which provide the people with a wide range of resources for economic production, and tourism potentials.Natural resource endowments are widely distributed. There are LGUs that enjoy the advantages of access to mountain and forest ecosystems, which is good for eco-tourismThere are areas that have pristine and abundant coastlinesAnd most have access to a river system that provides abundance, but unfortunately, also flooding.
  • The area is blessed with a wide variety of ecosytems which provide the people with a wide range of resources for economic production, and tourism potentials.Natural resource endowments are widely distributed. There are LGUs that enjoy the advantages of access to mountain and forest ecosystems, which is good for eco-tourismThere are areas that have pristine and abundant coastlinesAnd most have access to a river system that provides abundance, but unfortunately, also flooding.
  • So, each LGU may have its own advantages in terms of: land area and density special ecological forms and features (beaches and coastline, mountains) unique cultural heritage and history the people This means that each LGU has its own natural wealth which can still be developed.According to the data, Bula, Calabanga, Minalabac have the highest areaPopulation, - Naga, Pili, CamaliganDensity – Camaligan, Naga, Milaor
  • The conclusion?The basic ingredients for growth are available to all alliance members. The key is in sharing the capacities to transform these for the benefit of the people. This is one opportunity for the project.
  • What about the other data? What other information can be gained to help the project?The data have also pinpointed some deficiencies and needs of the LGUs. And, because of the very diversity of the member LGUs – some of which have already overcome the obstacles that others are currently experiencing – these can be addressed within the MNDC.
  • The DILG’s LGPMS indices revealed some important concerns after processing the data.After taking the average ratings of all the LGUs in all areas of governance, some aspects generated relatively lower ratings, which means that these governance dimensions can still be improved. These are shown to be in the fields of: Ecosystems ManagementRevenue GenerationLocal LegislationEntrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion
  • When the same indices were processed in terms of how far their measures were from the maximum or the best performance, the following aspects registered high figures, meaning that these were at a distance – ratings-wise, from the best performing LGUs:Ecosystems ManagementRevenue GenerationEntrepreneurship, Business and Industry PromotionSupport to Housing and Basic Utilities
  • And lastly after processing the same data under a system that measured the gap between the top three performing LGUs and the other 12 LGUs, differences in ratings were in the following:Ecosystems ManagementRevenue GenerationEntrepreneurship, Business and Industry PromotionLocal Legislation
  • It is obvious that these governance dimensions commonly surfaced as areas of improvement.In the field of Ecosystems Management, the survey also showed problems of some LGUs in their capacity to implement the provisions of the Solid Waste Management Act, which requires a large amount of funding.As an element of governance that cuts across all economic and social concerns, including tourism, it may be worthwhile to reconsider collaborative efforts to address this problem.
  • The three other “areas of concern” may be related.
  • The study showed deficiencies in some policies and plans that validates this set of results.
  • For instance, there are still LGUs who still have to implement their Comprehensive Development Plans.In the field of tourism, many incorporate tourism as part of their development efforts, but only five LGUs have formal Tourism Development Plans.
  • Another part of the study shows that such deficiencies are manifested in their self-ratings of their preparedness for local tourism development.The data shows that the average self-ratings are below the mean, which shows the lack of confidence in their capability to push ahead with local tourism programs.
  • The same lack of preparedness is reflected in their ratings for the availability of:mandates or policies for tourismthe implementation of tourism development plansthe implementation of investment and business incentives programsphysical infrastructure,facilities,and labor force capacitiesMany LGUs consider themselves as having potential and actual sites for tourism, but they do not have the policies and plans to support and develop these. In addition to these, there are deficiencies in infrastructure support, notably access to potential tourist sites.Some LGUs even cited the need to be fully oriented on what products and services can be channeled into the tourism marketIt is obvious that these issues should be addressed.
  • In the arena of local government support for entrepreneurship, business and industry promotion, which has been revealed to have registered weak ratings, the following conditions have been revealed by the study:there is a lack of financial institutions in the peripheral LGUsthere are no organized business groups or micro-enterprenurial organizations in the smaller LGUsThere is a wide disparity in the real estate costs, as well as charges in business charges and fees among the LGUs The study has collected enough data to support these observations, including more specific issues in the economy.
  • In the arena of local government support for entrepreneurship, business and industry promotion, which has been revealed to have registered weak ratings, the following conditions have been revealed by the study:there is a lack of financial institutions in the peripheral LGUsthere are no organized business groups or micro-enterprenurial organizations in the smaller LGUsThere is a wide disparity in the real estate costs, as well as charges in business charges and fees among the LGUs The study has collected enough data to support these observations, including more specific issues in the economy.
  • In the arena of local government support for entrepreneurship, business and industry promotion, which has been revealed to have registered weak ratings, the following conditions have been revealed by the study:there is a lack of financial institutions in the peripheral LGUsthere are no organized business groups or micro-enterprenurial organizations in the smaller LGUsThere is a wide disparity in the real estate costs, as well as charges in business charges and fees among the LGUs The study has collected enough data to support these observations, including more specific issues in the economy.
  • In the arena of local government support for entrepreneurship, business and industry promotion, which has been revealed to have registered weak ratings, the following conditions have been revealed by the study:there is a lack of financial institutions in the peripheral LGUsthere are no organized business groups or micro-enterprenurial organizations in the smaller LGUsThere is a wide disparity in the real estate costs, as well as charges in business charges and fees among the LGUs The study has collected enough data to support these observations, including more specific issues in the economy.
  • Overall, there may also be a need to consider the development of a mindset that gives due value to information. The data gaps encountered manifested the aversion or allergic reaction of some LGUs to the collection of statistics. The availability of economic indicators, and gender-disaggregated data are some data gaps that need to be addressed by the LGUs.There may be a need to share and standardize information management systems, not only for this project, but for development planning and management as a whole.
  • Macro – LGU and alliance levelsEconomic Proximity – can be extracted from a more detailed study of the local tourism industry (expenditure patterns of tourists [by type], economic linkages of beneficiaries, etc)Economic needs – disparities in income, size of establishments, sectoral employment (dependence on primary sector), etc.LGU T-potentials – specifically enumeratedLGU perceived capabilities – also listed, but on limited perception, may be validated – still valuable informationSpecific priorities and needs by various stakeholders and govt agences
  • Macro – LGU and alliance levelsEconomic Proximity – can be extracted from a more detailed study of the local tourism industry (expenditure patterns of tourists [by type], economic linkages of beneficiaries, etc)Economic needs – disparities in income, size of establishments, sectoral employment (dependence on primary sector), etc.LGU T-potentials – specifically enumeratedLGU perceived capabilities – also listed, but on limited perception, may be validated – still valuable informationSpecific priorities and needs by various stakeholders and govt agences
  • Another aspect in trying to organize the data into useful inputs is the recognition that whatever actions that are to be taken should be assessed in three dimensions:On whether these can be achieved immediately as “quick wins”, or due to time and resource constraints, these can be categorized into medium-term or long-term goals.Actions can be undertaken by the alliance as a whole, or a cluster of LGUs with the same concerns and objecties, or individual LGUs.And, another dimension would be whether the LGU would concentrate on being the host of a tourism site, or focus on special products or services, or a combination of the three. There has to be an acknowledgment that local tourism need not be based on a physical site alone, but that LGUs can also participate and benefit as suppliers of tourism products and services, or as primary or secondary suppliers of these goods.
  • There are LGUs which do not have the proper business friendly environment due to the lack of institutional or policy tools such as investments incentives programs, or even a comprehensive development plan. This is an opportunity for the more advanced LGUs to share their experiences and successes…There are still a substantial number of micro-entrepreneurs (those with small capitalization and unregistered) that can be organized and assistedThere are many ongoing economic enterprise development programs pushed by NGAs, such as the DTI, DOST, DAR, and others, that can be tapped and linked to the unorganized microentrepreneurs; also presence of large financial institutions in Naga, and MFIs in other LGUsThe OTOP is already underway in some municipalities, with successes based on collaborative efforts. Identified needs for greater promotion can be undertaken at an alliance levelSolid waste management is a critical issue among LGUs, and resource conservation is also a growing concern. The proper approach to such issues is on a level that goes beyond political boundaries, which the MNDC alliance can provide a venue forThe data shows discrepancies in the unemployment rates of women. However, WMEs are active in many LGUs. This is one area of sharing that the MNDC can expand its capabilities on.
  • Another aspect in trying to organize the data into useful inputs is the recognition that whatever actions that are to be taken should be assessed in three dimensions:On whether these can be achieved immediately as “quick wins”, or due to time and resource constraints, these can be categorized into medium-term or long-term goals.Actions can be undertaken by the alliance as a whole, or a cluster of LGUs with the same concerns and objecties, or individual LGUs.And, another dimension would be whether the LGU would concentrate on being the host of a tourism site, or focus on special products or services, or a combination of the three. There has to be an acknowledgment that local tourism need not be based on a physical site alone, but that LGUs can also participate and benefit as suppliers of tourism products and services, or as primary or secondary suppliers of these goods.
  • MNDC Local Economic Profile - Analysis

    1. 1. Why a Local Economic Profile?<br />Understand the Local Economy<br />The <br />LED Process<br />
    2. 2. What was our initial assessement of the current economic situation in Metro Naga?<br />UNEVEN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT<br />Understand the Local Economy<br />Peñafrancia Festival and Pilgrimage & Heritage Tours<br />Conventions and Special Events<br />
    3. 3. What is our goal for development?<br />UNEVEN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT<br />BALANCED<br />
    4. 4. What are our assumptions or starting points before a strategic development plan can be formulated?<br />UNEVEN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT<br />BALANCED<br />Presence of a growth engine and growth poles<br /><ul><li>Tourism as a growth engine
    5. 5. Naga City and Pili as growth poles</li></ul>2. Existence of a “core/pole-periphery” phenomenon<br /><ul><li>Gaps in economic indicators</li></ul>3. Potentials for “hitching on” the growth engines for a more balanced, inclusive development<br />
    6. 6. How do we “Tool-Up” or get ready for this type of development?<br />Do imbalances exist? <br />In what forms?<br /><ul><li> Validate our assumptions</li></ul>How can these be corrected through the “Tooling-Up” Strategy?<br /><ul><li> Provide Inputs for Strategic Planning</li></ul>What have we done so far?<br />
    7. 7. T-LED Database for the MNDC<br />Do imbalances exist? <br />In what forms?<br /><ul><li> Validate our assumptions</li></ul>How can these be corrected through the “Tooling-Up” Strategy?<br /><ul><li> Provide Inputs for Strategic Planning</li></ul>What have we done so far?<br />
    8. 8. T-LED Database for the MNDC<br />What data did we focus on?<br />Other Economy and Tourism-Related Information<br />Specific Information from LGUs<br />(Tourism Potentials,<br />LGU Capacities for T-LED) <br />Required by the LED Template<br />+<br />+<br />
    9. 9. T-LED Database for the MNDC<br />Where did we get the data?<br />DILG’s Local Governance Performance Management System<br /><ul><li>standardized data
    10. 10. processed indices</li></ul>MNDC Member Survey<br /><ul><li>additional data
    11. 11. perceptions/ self-ratings</li></li></ul><li>How much data did we gather?<br /><ul><li>175 sets of statistics from the LGU survey
    12. 12. 45 indicators from the LGPMS database
    13. 13. DILG profiles</li></li></ul><li>How much data did we gather?<br />Consolidated into the Database of more than 120 pages<br />
    14. 14. But just some key results…<br />The Results!<br />
    15. 15. Do “core areas” exist?<br />YES and NO!<br />NOT ALL ADVANTAGES BELONG TO WHAT WE CONSIDER THE “ECONOMIC GROWTH POLES”<br />
    16. 16. But first,<br />How did the “economic growth centers” show up in the data?<br />TAKE SOME EXAMPLES …<br />
    17. 17.
    18. 18. What are the other data that show the economic gaps?<br />Other Data Manifesting Economic Heterogenity and Differentials between alliance members:<br /><ul><li>Level of Locally Sourced Revenue [1]
    19. 19. Number of Public Utility Vehicles [2]
    20. 20. Employment by Economic Sector [3]
    21. 21. Dependence on Primary Sector Production [3]
    22. 22. Profiles of Distribution of Enterprises by Capitalization [3]
    23. 23. Types of Business Enterprises [3]</li></li></ul><li>Some data showing the “gaps”…<br />
    24. 24. NUMBER OF BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENTS<br />
    25. 25. ESTIMATED TOTAL CAPITALIZATION OF BUSINESS ENTERPRISES<br />
    26. 26. EXAMPLES OF DISTRIBUTION OF BUSINESSES BY CAPITALIZATION OF LGUS<br />
    27. 27. Number of Registered and Estimated Number of Unregistered Business Enterprises<br />
    28. 28.
    29. 29.
    30. 30.
    31. 31.
    32. 32.
    33. 33.
    34. 34.
    35. 35. Employment Distribution by Sector and Sex<br />For LGUs providing sex-disaggregated data<br />
    36. 36.
    37. 37.
    38. 38.
    39. 39.
    40. 40.
    41. 41. NAGA<br />NAGA<br />
    42. 42. How about the other data areas?<br />THE KEY WORD IS<br />DIVERSITY<br />
    43. 43. T-LED Database for the MNDC<br />Mountain, Forest Ecosystems<br />Coastal Zones<br />River Systems, <br />Lowland Areas<br /><ul><li> Range of Existing and Potential Tourism Sites (Eco-Tourism, Resorts) [ 5]
    44. 44. Vulnerability of Access (Transportation and Communication) [ 2]
    45. 45. Economic Production [ 3]</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Special Culture and Heritage</li></ul>T-LED Database for the MNDC<br /><ul><li> Data on Heritage and Culture [1]
    46. 46. Existing and Potential Tourism Products and Services [5]
    47. 47. Products and Services</li></li></ul><li>
    48. 48. T-LED Database for the MNDC<br /><ul><li> Basics [1]</li></li></ul><li>What does this mean?<br /><ul><li>The basic ingredients for development and tourism-led growth may be available to all alliance members.
    49. 49. There are opportunities for sharing effective technologies, practices, capacities and resourcesto transform these for the benefit of the people. </li></ul>STANDARDIZE<br />SPECIALIZE<br />SHARE<br />MODES OF POTENTIAL ACTION<br />
    50. 50. What are the other findings?<br /><ul><li>Specific needs have been manifested
    51. 51. Can be addressed by governance environment support</li></li></ul><li>POSSIBLE AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT:<br /><ul><li>Ecosystems Management
    52. 52. Revenue Generation
    53. 53. Local Legislation
    54. 54. Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion</li></li></ul><li>POSSIBLE AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT:<br /><ul><li>Ecosystems Management
    55. 55. Revenue Generation
    56. 56. Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion
    57. 57. Support to Housing and Basic Utilities</li></li></ul><li>POSSIBLE AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT:<br /><ul><li>Ecosystems Management
    58. 58. Revenue Generation
    59. 59. Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion
    60. 60. Local Legislation</li></li></ul><li>POSSIBLE AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT:<br /><ul><li>Ecosystems Management
    61. 61. Revenue Generation
    62. 62. Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion
    63. 63. Local Legislation
    64. 64. Implementation of Solid Waste Management Act
    65. 65. Lack of Facilities and Equipment
    66. 66. Sharing of Facilities and Programs?</li></li></ul><li>POSSIBLE AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT:<br /><ul><li>Ecosystems Management
    67. 67. Revenue Generation
    68. 68. Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion
    69. 69. Local Legislation</li></ul>Are these related?<br />Revenue Generation<br />Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion<br />Local Legislation<br />
    70. 70. Revenue Generation<br />Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion<br />Local Legislation<br />
    71. 71. Revenue Generation<br />Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion<br />Local Legislation<br />
    72. 72. Manifested in Perceptions on LGUs’ Preparedness for Local Development Tourism [6]<br />Revenue Generation<br />Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion<br />Local Legislation<br />
    73. 73. Manifested in Perceptions on LGUs’ Preparedness for Local Development Tourism [6]<br />Revenue Generation<br />Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion<br />Local Legislation<br />
    74. 74. Disparities among LGUs in:<br /><ul><li>Presence of Large Financial Institutions
    75. 75. Presence of Organized Business Groups
    76. 76. Presence of Organized Micro-Entrepreneurs / Cooperatives
    77. 77. Range of Real Estate Costs
    78. 78. Range in Business Fees</li></ul>Revenue Generation<br />Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion<br />Local Legislation<br />
    79. 79. Disparities among LGUs in:<br /><ul><li>Presence of Large Financial Institutions
    80. 80. Presence of Organized Business Groups
    81. 81. Presence of Organized Micro-Entrepreneurs / Cooperatives
    82. 82. Range of Real Estate Costs
    83. 83. Range in Business Fees</li></ul>Revenue Generation<br />Identified Strengths that could be sources of Additional Growth:<br /><ul><li>NGA support for economic enterprise development projects
    84. 84. Micro Finance Institutions</li></ul>Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion<br />Local Legislation<br />
    85. 85. Revenue Generation<br />Identified Strengths that could be sources of Additional Growth:<br /><ul><li>NGA support for economic enterprise development projects
    86. 86. Micro Finance Institutions</li></ul>Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion<br />Local Legislation<br />
    87. 87. Revenue Generation<br />Potential Employment and Income Creation<br />Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion<br />Governance Environment Support<br />Local Legislation<br />
    88. 88. Need for an information database mindset? <br />
    89. 89. So?<br />Alliance Level Indicators<br />Specific Information<br />Economic and Governance Status<br />LGU T-Potentials<br />LGU<br />Perceived Capabilities<br />Specific Development Priorites and Needs<br />MNDC, LGUs, NGAs, National Govt<br />Private Sector Stakeholders<br />
    90. 90. Alliance Level Indicators<br />Specific Information<br />Sites<br />Products<br />Services<br />Economic and Governance Status<br />LGU T-Potentials<br />LGU<br />Perceived Capabilities<br />Alliance Clusters LGUs<br />Specific Development Priorites and Needs<br /> Quick Wins Medium-Term Long-Term <br /> Activities Programs<br />MNDC, LGUs, NGAs, National Govt<br />Private Sector Stakeholders<br />
    91. 91. Possible actions for Tourism<br />Sites<br />Products<br />Services<br />Alliance Clusters LGUs<br />Promotional Campaigns and Materials<br />Tourism Development Plans<br />Inventory of Current Tourism Sites, Products, Services<br />Development of Sites, Products, <br />Services<br />Heritage, History, Cultural Studies and Groups<br /> Quick Wins Medium-Term Long-Term <br /> Activities Programs<br />
    92. 92. 1/<br /><ul><li>Stimulation of Local Investments and Entrepreneurship
    93. 93. Organizing and mobilization of Business Groups and Micro-Entrepreneurs
    94. 94. Expanding the scope of the current availability of Financing and Technical Support from the NGAs and private sector
    95. 95. Expanding the successes of the OTOPs which are already gaining momentum in many LGUs
    96. 96. Assistance in Environmental Protection, such as solid waste management in urban areas, and biodiversity conservation in special ecological zones
    97. 97. The promotion of Women’s Participation in entrepreneurship, which has already taken root in some LGUs</li></ul>Sites<br />Products<br />Services<br />Alliance Clusters LGUs<br /> Quick Wins Medium-Term Long-Term <br /> Activities Programs<br />STANDARDIZE<br />Potential Areas<br />SPECIALIZE<br />SHARE<br />
    98. 98. DIOS MABALOS PO!<br />Sites<br />Products<br />Services<br />for balanced and inclusive <br />growth and development<br />Alliance Clusters LGUs<br /> Quick Wins Medium-Term Long-Term <br /> Activities Programs<br />

    ×