Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering

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Project was to research youth volunteering using a human centered design lens. By listening to and observing the needs of young volunteers and of the adults that support them in these activities, we can design a system that uses current and emerging technology to facilitate the administration and participation in group volunteering opportunities.

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Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering

  1. 1. Design Innovation for Groupand Individual VolunteeringVersion 3.0Published December 09, 2009Created by Randall Blair
  2. 2. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 2 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)ContentsProject Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3Design MethodHuman Centered Design Process . . . . . . . . . . . 5Research & DiscoverYouth and Volunteering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7What Happens When Young Volunteers Grow Up? . . 8Youth and Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9Research Touchpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10User Behavioral Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11AnalyzeRequirements of Volunteers . . . . . . . . . . . . 13Requirements Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14SynthesizeSolutions Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16Concept Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17RealizeConcept. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19ResourcesResearch, Bibliography, Credits . . . . . . . . . . . 21© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  3. 3. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 3 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Project SummaryCan innovations that Situationaffect group and Young people in America are very willing to volunteer their time andindividual volunteering energy to efforts that truly believe they can help people and make a difference in their community. Agencies can benefit a great deal from thisactivities have a positive energetic and capable population.effect on future activities? Many adult volunteers have their first experience as volunteers as young children. It is common that these experiences are done as a group with family, friends, churches and other youth service organizations like scouting. Few, if any, good systems exist that give the young volunteers a way to independently match their time, communication, flexibility and socialization desires to a volunteer opportunity. There is also a need to develop a system or method to better manage the acquisition, communication and organization of individual volunteers into groups in a way that fits into an increasingly mobile/digital culture. Hypothesis Supporting group volunteering for young people will lead to increased volunteering for those people when they are adults. Aims of the Project By listening to and observing the needs of young volunteers and of the adults that support them in these activities, we can design a system that uses current and emerging technology to facilitate the administration and participation in group volunteering opportunities.© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  4. 4. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 4 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Design Method© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  5. 5. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 5 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Human Centered Design ProcessIn this model, once the need to use ahuman centered design process has beenidentified, four activities form the maincycle of work: Identify need for human centered1. Specify the context of use designIdentify the people who will use theproduct, what they will use it for, andunder what conditions they will use it. Specify Context of Use2. Specify requirementsIdentify any business requirements or usergoals that must be met for the product tobe successful. System satisfies Evaluate Designs specified Specify Requirements3. Create design solutions requirementsThis part of the process may be done instages, building from a rough concept to acomplete design. Produce Design Solutions4. Evaluate designsThe most important part of this process isthat evaluation - ideally through usabilitytesting with actual users - is as integralas quality testing is to good softwaredevelopment.© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  6. 6. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 6 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Research & Discover© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  7. 7. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 7 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Youth and VolunteeringA national study, Millions of Young People Volunteerconducted by the 15.5 million youths between the ages of 12 and 18 contributed more than 1.3 billion hours of service during 2004.Corporation for Nationaland Community Service, Young People Volunteer More Than Adultswith the U.S. Census Young people volunteered at twice the rate of adults with 55 percent ofBureau and Independent young people volunteering, compared with only 29 percent of adults.Sector, found the Volunteering Helps Young People Succeedfollowing facts about Youth who volunteer are less likely to engage in risky behavior, are moreyoung volunteers. likely to feel connected to their communities, and tend to do better in school. Altruism Is the Driving Motivator Youth who volunteer do so out of altruism, strongly agreeing with statements such as “I would like to help make the world a better place,” and “It’s important to do things for others.” Only 5% of students became involved with volunteering through a school requirement. Adult Role Models Are Crucial A youth who has a parent who volunteers is nearly three times more likely to volunteer on a regular basis. They Need Flexible Volunteer Opportunities Thirty-nine percent of teenagers volunteer on a regular basis; 35% do so occasionally; and 27% are episodic volunteers. Enhance College Application Volunteering positively represents citizenship and service can actually boost an applicant’s chances for admission to a college.© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  8. 8. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 8 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)What Happens When Young Volunteers Grow Up?A report from Majority of adult volunteers were youth volunteersIndependent Sector Forty-four percent of adults volunteer and two-thirds of these volunteersand Youth Service began volunteering their time when they were young.America illustrates the Greater Frequencystrong impact of youth Adults who began volunteering as youth are twice as likely to volunteer asservice on the giving and those who did not volunteer when they were younger.volunteering habits of Give and Volunteer Moreadults. In every income and age group, those who volunteered as youth give and volunteer more than those who did not. Volunteer Families Become Most Generous Those who volunteered as youth and whose parents volunteered became the most generous adults in giving time.© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  9. 9. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 9 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Youth and TechnologyThe use of mobile phones Mobile Useand social media – from 71% of teens 12-17 own a mobile phone.texting and blogging to Text-messaging is the number one activity for mobile users age 14-25 at 86%.online social networking Mobile users age 13-17 send and receive an average of 2,899 text messagesto creation of all kinds of per month. This is more than 3 times the rate of the nearest age group.digital material – is central Social Mediato many teenagers’ lives. Some 93% of teens use the internet, and more of them than ever are treating it as a venue for social interaction – a place where they can share creations, tell stories, and interact with others. The Pew Internet & American Life Project has found that 64% of online teens ages 12-17 have participated in one or more among a wide range of content- creating activities on the internet, up from 57% of online teens in a similar survey at the end of 2004. • 39% of online teens share their own artistic creations online, such as artwork, photos, stories, or videos, up from 33% in 2004. • 33% create or work on web pages or blogs for others, including those for groups they belong to, friends, or school assignments, basically unchanged from 2004 (32%). • 28% have created their own online journal or blog, up from 19% in 2004. • 27% maintain their own personal web page, up from 22% in 2004. • 26% remix content they find online into their own creations, up from 19% in 2004. The percentage of those ages 12-17 who said “yes” to at least one of those five content-creation activities is 64% of online teens, or 59% of all teens.© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  10. 10. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 10 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Research TouchpointsATTITUDE GROUPING DESIRE• like to go on the mission trips • Mission Outreach at the church • one boy 17 came and said he didn’t volunteer• have to = resentment • Boys do community service through scouting, at all, didn’t appeal to him• make it fun eagle scout projects • said it felt really good to help people• recruitment • Learn about opportunities through the • girls said they liked to volunteer because they groups they belong to, scouts, church, NHS always felt good about themselves afterward• positive talk, never “failure” in volunteering • Liked doing things as a group • to like it as adults , have to like it as kids• treat them as adults, they will act as adults • Don’t usually do independent things unless it • create volunteers for the long run• older kids should mentor younger kids is done as a family • Kids like the human contact, will get them to• For guys has to be more “macho” • if they need 10 they sign up 20 volunteer later on• responsibility • most guys who volunteer come in through• key to success is how the kids are treated their girlsCOMMUNICATION OPPORTUNITIES EASE• can email, announcements, posters , phone • schools have announcement screens that say • make it easy for the kids calls, facebook, twitter what’s happening • Remove barriers for the kids• student execs use text messaging to their • thought it wouldn’t be too hard to find a • kids are impulsive chairmen volunteer opportunity if they wanted to • most are after school• instant volunteering phone app • non threatening opportunities • don’t treat volunteering as something to• “drive-through volunteering • Being asked is a big motivator grade and pass• facebook app • “make it easy and fun”• alerts• Young people who discuss a volunteer experience are twice as likely as others to volunteer regularly.© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  11. 11. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 11 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)User Behavioral ModesThis set of behavioral modes defines the different ways users approach, engage, interact with, and even think about volunteering in groups . Mode Description ...wants to find and manage the logistics between the individual volunteers and the Group Organizer/Leader service organization. ...happily participates as often as they can and wants to stay current on the opportunities Enthusiastic Volunteer/Altruist available. Encourages others to join. ...is only interested in volunteering to enhance a college or job application or to fulfill a Reluctant Volunteer/Resume Builder school requirement.© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  12. 12. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 12 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Analyze© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  13. 13. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 13 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Requirements of VolunteersRequirements are formed by assessing more intangible things like motivations, preferences, hopes, and desired outcomes. “What are they trying toachieve” is a useful refrain for driving this analysis. Requirement Description Dynamic Delivery Support the timely notification of events, messages, alerts for known and potential opportunities. Secure and understandable management of the connections between the participants and the Elegant Administration requirements and contacts of volunteer opportunities. Allow for varied engagement styles, giving participants the ability to find necessary information Empowered Engagement and make informed and appropriate decisions while maximizing their control. Ways of communicating to and with individuals and the general public connecting them to the Social Experience participant and the opportunities.© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  14. 14. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 14 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Requirements Matrix = size indicates relative Group Organizer/ Enthusiastic Volunteer/ Reluctant Volunteer/importance of requirement to user Leader Altruist Resume Builder Elegant Administration 1 Empowered Engagement 2 3 Dynamic Delivery Social Experience The System User must have the ability to... 1 Organize the Connected Group 2 Control Event Information 3 Interact With the World© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  15. 15. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 15 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Synthesize© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  16. 16. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 16 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Solutions Architecture VOLUNTEER ORGANIZER PARTICIPANT Organize the Connected Group Control Event Information Interact With the World • Organize event information Notification • Ability to post comment on all events • Notify members of requirements to • Proactive alerts about appropriate groups • Can invite others to volunteer in specific participate or opportunities based on preferences opportunities • Set maximum and minimum group • Instant notification of an immediate • Communicate with any or all of the entire members for a particular opportunity volunteer need team at once • Create events • Tag opportunities and groups for search • Share experiences with their group and/ • Search database for events and grouping or the public • View group member information • Receive alerts and messages via e-mail, • Post media (images, movies) related to an sms, social-application messaging event • View commitments for the events • Export events to calendar or print • Use a scoring or rating system for events • Assign other roles for the event Empowerment • Post volunteering levels or status in a • Allow access to event information public way if desired • Get notified of any special requirements • Invite people to join event • Communicate volunteer activities in • Ability to make information be private • Communicate with event agency other media • Access personal volunteering history • Empowered to commit to opportunities • Search for opportunities based on criteria • Track their volunteer time • Can create a report of volunteer activities© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  17. 17. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 17 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Concept Map© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  18. 18. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 18 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Realize© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  19. 19. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 19 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)ConceptThe concept is to create an online application that will store volunteer opportunities and user history in a database. The user will be able to access thedata and search for events, pledge hours and see their history. It will utilize Facebook Connect to provide the seamless experience to the millions ofusers of that platform. This will also allow a similar experience for the user to update this content on a website, in Facebook and on a mobile device. Next event is at the top of the list Screen to manage events and At-a-Glance history and hours their properties given and pledged Screen to manage groups Report of volunteer history with hours, locations, dates. Exportable. Way to set preferences when to be notified if someone needs help now Friends hours shown for motivation/competition Page to set preferences for messaging, search, communications Utilize Facebook Connect for accountmanagement and connecting to friends Search by tags/keywords for and status updates. events. Preferences can be set for common tags (location,etc) Event title data and location Easy to ad event to your calendar Additional event notes and instructions can be hidden if Ability to create your own event desired to add to the global database or to make private Ability to invite friends to pledge Easy to see pledge status for and to message to the event any events that are in your list. participants Clicking can change status.© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  20. 20. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 20 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Resources© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair
  21. 21. Design Innovation for Group and Individual Volunteering 21 of 21Version 3.0 published December 09, 2009 by Randall Blair (randall.r.blair@gmail.com)Research, Bibliography, CreditsBibliography Special Thankshttp://nonprofit.about.com/od/volunteers/tp/youthvol.htm To the students and directors of the SHAREhttp://www.civicyouth.org/?page_id=237 program at Shawnee Mission East High School in Leawood, KS.http://www.independentsector.org/programs/research/engagingyouth.html Members of Valley View United Methodisthttp://www.upassoc.org/usability_resources/about_usability/what_is_ucd.html Church Youth in Overland Park, KS.© Copyright 2008, Randall Blair

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