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XNB151 Week 6 Role of religion and faith in food choices
 

XNB151 Week 6 Role of religion and faith in food choices

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    XNB151 Week 6 Role of religion and faith in food choices XNB151 Week 6 Role of religion and faith in food choices Presentation Transcript

    • Role of Religion and Faith in Food Choices XNB151 Food and Nutrition
    • Roles of food in religion Food Communication with God Demonstration of faithDiscipline through fasting
    • Religion in Australia Affiliation 2006 (‘000) 2006% Anglican 3 718.3 18.7% Baptist 316.7 1.6 Catholic 5 126.9 25.8 Chruches of Christ 54.8 0.3 Jehovah’s Witnesses 80.9 0.4 Latter Day Saints 53.1 0.3 Lutheran 251.1 1.3 Eastern Orthodox 544.3 2.7 Pentecostal 219.6 1.1 Presbyterian & Reformed Churches 596.7 3.0 Salvation Army 64.2 0.3 Seventh Day Adventist 55.3 0.3 Uniting Church 1 135.4 5.7 Other Christian 468.9 2.4 Christian Total 12 685.9 63.9 Australian Bureau of Statistics
    • Religion in Australia Affiliation 2006 (‘000) 2006% Buddhism 418.8 2.1 Hinduism 148.1 0.7 Islam 340.4 1.7 Judaism 88.8 0.4 Other non-Christian 109 0.5 No religion 3706.5 18.7 Not stated/Inadequately described 2357.8 11.9 Australian Bureau of Statistics
    • Religions which require particular food rules include: • Islam; • Hinduism; • Judaism; • Buddhism (strict); • Seventh-day Adventist Church;
    • Catholicism – Fasting before communion (uncommon) – Fasting and abstain from favourite foods during lent – No meat (excluding seafood) on Ash Wednesday & Good Friday – Some may abstain from meat every Friday in lent or throughout the year
    • Other Christian • Most have few restrictions • Seventh Day Adventists – ban tobacco & alcohol – Tea & coffee discouraged – Modified vegetarian diet • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints – Alcohol, tea, coffee, tobacco, cola avoided – Encouraged to eat meat sparingly
    • Buddhism • Dietary prohibitions & fasting vary • Many are vegetarians as eating meat causes suffering to animals • No alcohol • Fasting practices varies across different branches
    • Islam • Restrictions laid out in the Quran • Prohibits – Pork – Blood – Animals slaughtered in the name of anyone but Allah. – Carcasses of dead animals – An animal that has been strangled, beaten (to death), killed by a fall, gored (to death), savaged by a beast of prey – Food over which Allah's name is not pronounced – Alcohol and other intoxicants • Fasting during Ramadan – Exempt if sick or nursing mother Iznik 16th – Benaki Islamic Museum Greece
    • Hinduism • Strict Hindus eat no meat, fish, alcohol or eggs • Most Hindus do not eat any red meat, may eat fish, chicken, eggs and alcohol • Fasting & feasting – Individual and at Festivals BAPS Swaminarayan Akshardham
    • Judaism • Kashrut – set of biblical dietary laws. – Kosher foods meet these standards • Certain Foods are Forbidden – Pork, blood & non kosher meat – Seafood without fins & scales • Certain foods must be separated – E.g. Meat & milk • Kosher wine Illuminated Manuscript, Jewish Museum London
    • Indigenous Australian Faith • Complex oral tradition and spiritual values based upon reverence for the land and a Belief in the Dreamtime • Different groups had different belief structuresBush Tucker Dreaming June Sultan Napanga www.aboriginalartstore.com.au
    • Conclusions • As health professionals respect for all faiths (including no beliefs) is an essential part of ethical practice • Understanding of the role of food in religion is a part of understanding the human experience of food throughout history • A characteristic of most faiths is gratitude and respect for food and many have organisations involved in working to resolve national or world hunger • Personal beliefs & values can impact food choices outside of religion, e.g. Choosing to be vegetarian or vegan, eating locally