Technology soft skills

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Technology soft skills

  1. 1. TECHNOLOGY + SOFT SKILLS = 100 PERCENT STUDENT ENGAGEMENT Presenters: Elgin Community College Beverly Augustine Michael Segreto Elgin, IL © 2009 Beverly Augustine & Michael Segreto
  2. 2. Educators’ Use of Technology ► Since 1970s ► Expanded in last decade ► Examples • Software • Videos • Clickers 2
  3. 3. Today’s Technology ► Advanced PowerPoint ► Used in game format 3
  4. 4. Types ► Academic – for learning ► Non-academic – for fun Played under rules to gain specific objective 4
  5. 5. Rationale ► Active learning ► Participation ► Socialization ► Learning transfer 6
  6. 6. Students transfer • What they learn • Who they become 7
  7. 7. Active Listening ► Focus on others while they speak ► Wait your turn to speak ► Ask for clarification 8
  8. 8. Teamwork ► Contribute to common goal ► Own responsibility for team task ► Respond positively if asked to help 9
  9. 9. Self- Management ► Self-control ► Self-motivation ► Adaptability 10
  10. 10. “In today’s working environment, where customers and employees are demanding more, instilling the use of soft skills in your team members is something you simply can’t survive without.” Nicolaides, Carole. “Focus on Soft Skills: A Leadership Wake-up Call” http://www.businessknowhow.com/growth/softskills.htm. Accessed February 25, 2009. 11
  11. 11. Why CEOs Fail ► Inability to • Place right people in right jobs • Fix people problems timely Bock, Wally. “They May Be Soft Skills, But They’re Real Important.” http://www.mondaymemo.net/020204/feature.htm. Accessed February 25, 2009. 12
  12. 12. Good soft skills are in fact scarce in the highly competitive corporate world. Challa S.S.J. Ram Phani. “The top 60 soft skills that work.” http://in.rediff.com/getahead/2007/jan/08soft.htm. Accessed February 23, 2009. 13
  13. 13. “There are a high number of workplace cultures that encourage bullying because of high levels of competition.” Sarah Tracy, Director of the Project for Wellness and Work-Life, Arizona State University. Bryner, Jeanna. “Study Reveals Widespread Office Bully Problem.” http://www.livescience.com/health/070402_workplace_bully.html. Accessed February 23, 2009. 14
  14. 14. “Bullying, by definition, is escalatory. This is one of the reasons it’s so difficult to prevent it, because it usually starts in really small ways.” Sarah Tracy, Director of the Project for Wellness and Work-Life, Arizona State University. Bryner, Jeanna. “Study Reveals Widespread Office Bully Problem.” http://www.livescience.com/health/070402_workplace_bully.html. Accessed February 23, 2009. 15
  15. 15. CEOs, Students ► Leaders • CEOs lead their companies • Students lead their lives ► Critical decision makers 16
  16. 16. Business Communications 17
  17. 17. ► 18 each of three formats • True or False • Multiple Choice • Fill in the Blank ► Any number played in any order 18
  18. 18. Scoring ► Points each • True or False – 1 • Multiple Choice – 1 • Fill in the Blank – 2 or ► Not preprogrammed 19
  19. 19. Strengths – 1 of 2 ► Three- or four-member teams ► Each member chooses task • Question caller • Answer giver • Writer • Researcher 21
  20. 20. Strengths – 2 of 2 ► Tracking sheet ensures participation • Members called for contribution • Contribution confirms (not decides) team’s action ► Balancing via Triple Play questions, bonus round 22
  21. 21. Triple Play Questions ► Two per format ► Initial team correct • Triple points ► MC or FITB, initial team incorrect • Question offered to all other teams • If other team(s) correct, triple points • If no other team correct, no score 23
  22. 22. Bonus Round ► Last round ► All teams answer all questions ► Writers confirm answers on paper, reveal when asked ► All correct answers score 24
  23. 23. Lifelines ► “Who Wants to be a Millionaire?” adaptation ► Three per team • Individual, One Group, All Groups ► One per question 25
  24. 24. Lifeline Scoring Scenarios LIFELINE TEAM POINTS Correct Accepts Both Correct Rejects Lifeline Incorrect Accepts Neither Incorrect Rejects Team, if correct Incorrect Rejects Neither, if team is incorrect 26
  25. 25. Team Setup ► Random selection • Lifelines typed on colored paper slips • Slips chosen blindly ► Paper, dry erase markers provided 27
  26. 26. Timing ► Initial team – 30 seconds to answer, use lifeline ► If lifeline used – 10 additional seconds ► Initial team accepts, rejects lifeline’s answer 28
  27. 27. Strengths ► Clockwise, counterclockwise labeling, game playing ► Players’ engagement, enthusiasm spreading within entire class 29
  28. 28. T ogether E ach A ccomplishes M ore 30
  29. 29. RESULT 100% Participation, Increased Learning 31
  30. 30. TRUE OR FILL IN MULTIPLE CHOICE FALSE THE BLANK Correct Correct Correct Incorrect Incorrect (throw out) Incorrect Triple Play, Lifeline Lifeline 32
  31. 31. ► Reach variety of learning styles ► Offer students • Experience with technology • Opportunity to observe, practice soft skills ► Build,reinforce student comfort of course material 33
  32. 32. ► Socially benefits students • Feel better about themselves • Reach out more to other students, tutors, instructor ► Engages students in learning ► Provides immediate feedback to students 34
  33. 33. Student Comment – 1 of 2 “Playing this game helps us to remember a lot of things from the chapter. We should do it more often.” 35
  34. 34. Student Comment – 2 of 2 “Playing the game as a testing review was a great refresher. To obtain information I need to see the content in two different ways. I usually have to figure that out on my own. The game was a great help, and I thought it was fun.” 36
  35. 35. Closing Thoughts – 1 of 2 ► Positive addition Engage – even require – participation Encourage student learning, fun while satisfying other stakeholders Prepare students for learning they will encounter in their professional lives 42
  36. 36. Closing Thoughts – 2 of 2 ► Help faculty Focus on learning Embrace effective, alternate pedagogies ► Accept as learning tools rather than time fillers ► Create lifelong learners 43
  37. 37. “The collaborative problem solving, research, critical analysis, and diplomatic skills are fundamental in today’s society and will become increasingly integral in the future.” Bryant, Todd. “From Age of Empires to Zork: Using Games in the Classroom.” http://www.academiccommons.org/commons/essay/gamesinclassroom Accessed October 28, 2008. 44
  38. 38. ▶ Bryant, Todd. “From Age of Empires to Zork: Using Games in the Classroom.” http://www.academiccommons.org/commons/essay/gamesinclassroom. Accessed October 28, 2008. ▶ Cruickshank, D. R. & Telfer, Ross (2001). Classroom Games and Simulations. Theory into Practice, 19(1), 75-80. ▶ Kumar, Rita, & Lightner, Robin (2007). Games as an Interactive Classroom Technique: Perceptions of Corporate Trainer, College Instructors and Students. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 19(1), 53-63. 45
  39. 39. ▶ Laun, Christina. “Virtual Learning: 25 Best Sims and Games for the Classroom.” College@Home. http://www.collegeathome.com/blog/2008/06/03/virtual-learning-25-best- sims-and-games-for-the-classroom. Accessed October 30, 2008. ▶ Robinson, Sherry (2007). “Games, Clickers, and Study Habits: Increasing Students’ Motivation to Study and Participate.” Management Review: An International Journal, 2(2), 98-111. 46
  40. 40. Questions, comments? Please contact us: baugustine@elgin.edu msegreto@elgin.edu 47
  41. 41. Thank you for your attention! 48

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