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    Event planning guidelines_final_version_4_april_2009 Event planning guidelines_final_version_4_april_2009 Document Transcript

    • EVENT PLANNING GUIDELINES
    • INTRODUCTION The University of Oxford is renowned for its diverse and exciting events. Each and every event, no matter what the goal or size, from a building opening to a Sunday afternoon lecture, is an opportunity to promote and reinforce the international profile of the University. Events offer people the chance to experience the University first-hand and it is important that their content and delivery reflect our work and values. The Events Office oversees a wide range of events each year from traditional ceremonies and high profile visits to world-class lectures and topical debates. We work with all departments, divisions and colleges across the University to help ensure that everyone achieves their goals and all events are a success. The Events Office plays a key role in giving support and advice to other members of the University who are responsible for planning and delivering events. We are keen to share experiences and best practice and have compiled the following information and guidelines for developing, planning and running events based on our experiences and those of our colleagues around the University. Events Office University of Oxford University Offices Wellington Square Oxford OX1 2JD T: 01865 280524 E: events@admin.ox.ac.uk W: www.ox.ac.uk/public_affairs/events/ If you have any queries about the content or resources in this toolkit, or if you need any specialist advice for your event that is not covered here, please do not hesitate to contact us. Event planning guidelines 2008 1
    • EVENT PLANNING GUIDELINES EVENT PLANNING GUIDELINES CONTENTS page GETTING STARTED page EVENT PLANNING CHECKLIST Your event proposal 4 Developing your event idea 5 34 DELIVERING YOUR EVENT The run-up to the event PLANNING YOUR EVENT 36 Developing an event plan and timeline Setting up for the event 37 Key areas in your event plan 10 Managing the event on the day 38 • Agreeing the budget 10 EVALUATING YOUR EVENT • Setting the date 11 Why evaluate? 44 • Timings for the event 12 How to evaluate your event 44 • Working with VIPs 13 Using your evaluation information 45 • Choosing a venue 17 • Compiling and managing the guest list 19 • Organising the invitations 21 • Catering 27 EVENT PROPOSAL TEMPLATE 46 • Audio/visual 28 EVENT PLAN & TIMELINE TEMPLATE 48 • Event staff 29 EVENT BUDGET TEMPLATE 50 • Transport 30 EVENT EVALUATION TEMPLATE 52 • Publicity 31 • Insurance 31 • Table plans, place cards, badges 2 9 32 Event planning guidelines 2008 RESOURCES Event planning guidelines 2008 3
    • GETTING STARTED GETTING STARTED Your event proposal Developing your event idea If you have an idea for an event, a useful first step is to put together an event proposal; a document which outlines the reason for the event and what you are planning to do. Having these agreed early in the planning process provides a focus for everyone involved and a guide for planning and delivery decisions. It also enables you to think ahead in terms of what will be needed and who will be involved in organising and running the event. Discussion and consultation The key questions that your proposal should answer are: Agreeing the aim, objectives and format for the event early on and ensuring that everyone is fully on board, will make the event planning process more straightforward and will put you in a better position to determine the level of resources you will need to make the event a success. It can also give you an opportunity to incorporate positive new ideas for the events at the planning stage and assist in post-event evaluation. What is the event? Why are you having an event? What will happen at the event? Who is the event for? Who will plan and run the event? How much will the event cost and who will pay for it? When will the event happen? Where will the event take place? You can download an event proposal template from the Events Office website and there is a hard copy on page 44 of this booklet. Your proposal will be particularly useful if you are working with other individuals or departments on an event. It provides a summary of the key elements and structure of the proposed event, which can then be discussed in more detail and developed with others involved in the planning and delivery. If you do not have a clear proposal to guide your planning, you may find that the key messages of the event get confused, and that you waste time and energy further down the line changing plans and making decisions that could have been agreed at the start. If you are planning an event which will be of particular interest to other areas of the University, perhaps in terms of the content or target audience, discuss your proposal with them at an early stage, even if you do not need to involve them in the planning or delivery of the event. At the very least they will probably want to attend the event, they may also have useful suggestions or contacts if you are compiling a guest list or looking for speakers or an appropriate venue. Research Resource You can download a template event proposal template on the Events Office website at www.ox.ac.uk/public_affairs/ events/ 4 Event planning guidelines 2008 Try and find out about other events of a similar theme/nature both inside and outside the University. This may give you some inspiration for developing your event in terms of the style, duration or activities that might work well. This is also a good opportunity to ensure that you are not duplicating a similar event that is happening somewhere else. The Events Office has experience of organising and managing a wide variety of events and would be happy to discuss your ideas at the development stage. We also maintain a University-wide events diary to help avoid clashes in the timing or goals of different events. Event planning guidelines 2008 5
    • GETTING STARTED GETTING STARTED Agreeing your event idea Before you begin any in-depth planning for the event, you should discuss your proposal with the appropriate people/departments, for example your line manager, the budget holder and the head of your department, division or College. You can use your proposal to give them a concise overview of the key information about the event. How the University Events Office can help The Events Office staff have many years experience of planning and running events and may be able to help you with advice, information and resources. Among other things, the Events Office can: • advise on whether your proposed event will clash with another event in the University calendar in terms of date or aim/content; • if appropriate, liaise with the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor’s offices if you plan to invite them to preside at the event or if you would like to invite someone outside the University to do the honours; • provide information on planning and budgeting, such as venues, caterers and approximate costs; • offer examples of and advice on best practice and protocol in relation to your event, such as timings, the order of events and appropriate briefings. 6 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 7
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Give yourself TIME Developing an event plan and timeline Time is one of the most valuable, and often overlooked, resources in planning events. Start planning well in advance, so you have a better chance of securing your first choice of date, venue, host/speakers and guests. It will also provide you with more flexibility to deal with unforeseen changes or developments along the way. Once you have agreed and approved the proposal for your event, you should put together a detailed event plan in which you break down all the tasks that need to be done and assign responsibility and deadlines for each one. Your event plan should be constantly updated as tasks are completed or changed so that you can use it for regular status reports. Get ORGANISED Start a folder containing all your planning documents such as the proposal, event plan, budget, contact details and quotes. This will be your guide for the event planning process and should be updated regularly. Remember to COMMUNICATE Give regular updates on progress and any developments to key individuals and departments working on the event, remembering to include any interested parties who may not be directly involved in the planning and delivery. Regular communication from the start will help ensure that everyone knows what their role is and feels valued as part of the team. You may also find it useful to create a timeline, linked to your event plan but less detailed, which counts you down to your event and acts as a quick reference guide to help you stay on track and ensure that everything gets done. It is laid out like a month by month planner so that you can see at a glance when your workload will be heaviest and how you can best use your resources. Once you have developed your event plan, check it against your event proposal to ensure that you have made appropriate plans and arrangements for all the key elements of the event. You can download a combined event plan and timeline template with guidelines from the Events Office website. More details on completing the template can also be found on page 46 of this booklet. Resource You can download a template event plan & timeline template on the Events Office website at www.ox.ac.uk/public_affairs/ events/ 8 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 9
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Key areas in your event plan Agreeing the budget Setting the date Normally your budget can be a very simple outline of projected costs which is quick to complete but will provide an essential tool for monitoring your expenditure. The Events Office has designed a budgeting form to help you estimate your expenditure. This should be agreed with the budget holder before you start spending! Some costs may immediately spring to mind when planning an event, such as: Deciding on the date Venue Catering (food and/or drinks) Audio/visual equipment/staff If there is no obvious date for your event (such as an anniversary or scheduled VIP visit to the University), you could research information on relevant dates in the university/college history and propose a date to coincide with this. You can find information on University term and other key dates here: www. ox.ac.uk/about_the_university/university_year/index.html. You can find general information about UK public holidays here: www.direct.gov.uk/en/ Governmentcitizensandrights/LivingintheUK/DG_073741. Transport Avoiding competition with other events Staff - waiting staff, stewards, admin, first aiders The Events Office holds a University-wide diary of to help ensure that your proposed date does not clash with another major University event. You should also check with your departmental, divisional or college events/alumni office, if you have one, to ensure that your proposed date is suitable. Even if events that are happening on the same day have very different themes, you may find that this will cause unnecessary complications for the planning and organisation when securing the venue, attracting your target audience and arranging catering and transport, for example. Stationery (invitations, menus, badges etc) Printing/photocopying (publicity material, invitations, programmes etc) But remember to include other more hidden costs, such as: Speaker expenses (travel, hotel, food) Getting into a VIP’s busy diary Postage (invitations, publicity etc) If it is important that the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor or external VIP attends/hosts your event, it is essential that you approach them well in advance of the proposed date (You should give them at least six months’ advance notice of the date). Your event proposal will be useful in outlining the purpose and format of the event and highlighting the important role of the VIP. Where your VIP is an integral part of your proposed event (e.g. a lecture or presentation), offer more than one date to their office as this flexibility will make it easier to find a date that works for everyone. Decorations (flowers etc) Photography Security You can download an event budget template from the Events Office website. More details on completing the template can also be found on page 48 of this booklet. Resource You can download a template event budget template on the Events Office website at www.ox.ac.uk/public_affairs/ events/ 10 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 11
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Timings for the event Working with VIPs When deciding on the timing, write out a sequence of activities for the day to give you a clearer picture of how much time you need to allow. VIPs are people who are important to your event or wider work. They do not have to be well-known and can be internal or external to the University. By identifying them as a VIP, you can help to ensure that they get the attention and information that they need in advance of the event and on the day. Some key time allowances to consider include moving large numbers of people from one building or room to another, transporting guests, speeches and/or presentations, seating guests, and serving food. Large crowds tend to move quite slowly, as do small crowds moving in to dinner after chatting in the bar! If you are planning to have speeches and/or presentations for a standing audience, they should normally last a maximum of 5 to 10 minutes each, with no more than two in a row without a break. Think about what has and has not worked at events that you or your colleagues have attended and feed this into your plans. You can also contact the Events Office for advice on timings for events. Getting VIPs to your event The further ahead you are able to approach VIPs for an event, the better, as their diaries may be booked up many months or even years in advance. This is particularly important when inviting a VIP to host or speak at your event, but also applies to any guests that you hope will be able to attend. Identifying an appropriate external VIP host The University has a wide network of friends and supporters, in a variety of fields of interest. If you are planning to ask a VIP who is external to the University to preside over or host an event, you should contact the Vice-Chancellor’s office initially as they may be able suggest appropriate individuals or advise on approaching someone you already have in mind. You can initially approach the Events Office who may liaise with the Vice-Chancellor’s office on your behalf. If you are planning to invite a Head of State or Royal to your event, please contact the Events Office before approaching them. Inviting an external VIP to host Once you have discussed and agreed your VIP host with the Vice-Chancellor’s office, the invitation would usually be sent from the Vice-Chancellor on behalf of the University. You should draft a letter of invitation and send it to the Vice-Chancellor’s office to be reviewed and signed. If you would like to include some additional information with the letter, you will need to inform the Vice-Chancellor’s office and ensure that they receive the letter and all relevant documents at the same time for approval. 12 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 13
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Inviting the Chancellor and/or Vice-Chancellor to host or attend Liaising with the VIPs office The Events Office is usually involved in the planning and delivery of any events which the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor preside over. If you would like the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor to preside over or attend your event, please contact the Events Office as far in advance as possible to discuss your event. The Events Office will then liaise with the Vice-Chancellor’s office if necessary to explore possible dates. Once an invitation to host, speak or attend has been accepted, contact the VIP, or their office, so that they know how to contact you and you know who to contact in their office. This is an opportunity to find out well in advance whether they have any special requirements that you should incorporate in your planning, such as transport, parking, a room in which to change/prepare, refreshments, presentation equipment as well as dietary or access requirements. Most importantly, for events hosted or attended by the Chancellor or ViceChancellor, or events with University-wide significance, the guest list should be sent to the Vice-Chancellor’s office for review and suggestions before invitations are issued. VIP information and profiles You may need some biographical information about a speaker or host for publicity material and/or for briefings for internal or events staff. Contact the VIP’s office in the first instance to find out whether they have standard text for this. If they are not able to help or point you in the right direction, you can usually find information on the internet. However, this information may not be accurate or up-to-date so you should always make sure that any text you plan to use has been approved by the VIP’s office before it is circulated. Ensure that they have as much information on the event as they need, including the background context, any key messages, the location, the timings, who will be introducing them and any notes for their speech including duration and target audience. Prepare a briefing pack which should be sent to their office at an agreed time in advance of the event and also be available on the day. In some cases, it may be appropriate to offer a meeting with the head of division, head of department or head of house, for example, before the event, or even to arrange a tour of Oxford or a specific area of the University that might be of particular interest to them. You want to make their experience of the event as enjoyable as possible. Find out how they are planning to get to the venue and make sure that you have a mobile phone number for them, their driver or a person who is travelling with them so that you can contact them once they have left the office. Send clear directions to the venue and check for major roadworks/road closures on their route. You can do this online for Oxfordshire through Oxfordshire County Council (www.oxfordshire.gov.uk – Council Services > Roads and Transport > Roadworks) and for the rest of the country through AA Road Watch (www.theaa.com/travelwatch/travel_news.jsp). The traffic in Oxford can be very slow so ensure their office knows to allow ample time for their journey. If they are travelling by car, you will also need to make sure that you have arranged appropriate parking and that you have let them know the details in advance. 14 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 15
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Looking after VIPs on arrival Choosing a venue First impressions really do count and if you have invited someone to speak at your event and there is no-one there to welcome them when they arrive, it will not reflect well on the organiser or commissioner of the event. Make sure that you have agreed who is going to be responsible for meeting the VIPs on arrival, and that this person is fully briefed; they know where they are going, what refreshments are on offer and what the VIP’s schedule is in case they have any queries. They should also have some spare copies of the VIP’s briefing pack to hand. Starting your venue search Introducing VIPs The key factors in deciding on the right venue will most likely be the location, facilities, the capacity and the cost. Visiting potential venues is the most effective way of finding out whether it is suitable for the particular event or activities that you are planning. You can also ask whether they have held similar events at that venue in the past and how they worked. If you have a VIP guest speaker or host for your event, it is common for either the host or Head of your department or institution to welcome the audience and give a short introduction on the event and the VIP before handing over to them. Once you have agreed who would be the most appropriate person to do this, make sure they are aware of what they should say, how long they should speak for and where they should sit once they leave the stage. You may need to write their introductory notes for them. Your VIP will also need to know who is going to introduce them and what their cue is to take the stage. Thanks and closing remarks Similarly, on some occasions it is customary for the individual who introduced a VIP speaker or host to make brief closing remarks at the end of a speech or presentation. Again you will need to let them know what to say and it is probably a good idea to make some notes. Closing remarks tend to focus on thanking the VIPs, summarising the key messages of the event (where appropriate), thanking others involved in planning and delivering the event (including the audience) and informing guests if there is another element to the event, such as refreshments served in the foyer or dinner served in the main hall. Bear in mind closing remarks should be very brief and should not introduce large amounts of new information. The Events Office has put together a list of University, college and other Oxford venues with details on capacity, location and special facilities which may be useful in identifying an appropriate venue. A copy of this list is available on request. Finding the right venue The event could potentially be held across more than one venue. This usually works most effectively when the venues are in easy reach of each other, for example combining the Divinity School and the Sheldonian Theatre, but may also work when the venues are further apart with appropriate planning and transport. The University Events Office may be able to advise you if you have queries about venues for different types of events. Considering special requirements Depending on the type of event you are planning, you may need to consider special requirements or facilities such as audio/visual technology, changing rooms, secure cloakrooms/room for baggage or additional furniture. It is a good idea to contact potential venues directly to discuss your particular requirements as they can advise you based on past experience. Getting the space you need When you book the venue, make sure that you are booking all the space you are going to need. Some venues book out other rooms for other events so you may want to find out whether any other events are planned at the same time as your event. If you need your own private reception area, for example, you may need to book an extra room for this. 16 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 17
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Planning the layout Compiling and managing the guest list The layout of your event will depend on the size, format and activities. Visiting the venue and walking through what will happen on the day really helps you see how the event will work in practice, not just on paper. Compiling the guest list Some points to consider in addition to space and special requirements include: Adequate signposting at the entrance to the building and from the entrance to the room/area where the event will take place is important because some guests may not have been there before A registration desk for guests to announce their arrival, collect badges/ programmes etc. If you are planning to have this at your event, where will it be placed to ensure that it is not easily missed or bypassed Adequate signposting of available facilities, such as toilets, cloakroom, left luggage, exits A seating plan for any part of the event – this should usually be printed in the largest format possible, on display in more than one place at the event and not displayed in doorways or corridors where a crowd could block a thoroughfare. In some cases copies of the seating plan for a dinner, for example, can be circulated to all guests earlier on in the event. If you are planning to do this, you will need to identify the most appropriate time and location Reserved seating for the host, speaker(s) and/or VIPs. You will need to ensure that they have easy access to the stage or other areas relevant for your specific event, that they know where their seats are and that their seats are clearly reserved with signs if necessary Keeping all guest information, including titles, names, addresses, dietary requirements and partners’ names, together on one list, will make managing the guest list much more simple. If you are working with a number of different people or departments on an event, the most efficient way to compile a guest list is to give one person or office responsibility for holding a master guest list, issuing the invitations and acting as the main point of contact for guests. Everyone who is working on the event can then submit suggestions or amendments to that person or office. The University Events Office uses an Excel sheet to record and monitor guest list information. You can download a template guest list from the Events Office website. It is usually the responsibility of the event commissioner to put forward the guest list and, depending on the circumstances, this may be added to by other interested parties. In addition to the guests put forward within a department or college, it may also be appropriate to ask other departments, colleges or individuals within the University who have a link with the event, whether they have any suggestions or contacts. In some cases, the event commissioner may wish to send a personalised invitation with a letter to their contacts. If this is the case, those invitations are still prepared by the master guest list holder with the rest of the invitations for the event, and are then sent to the commissioner to be included with their own letter. Places for the event may be limited so if you find that you have more suggestions than you are able to invite, ask the commissioner to prioritise their guests and operate an ‘A’ list of priority guests and a ‘B’ list of reserve guests to be invited as and when ‘A’ list guests are unable to attend. In this case, your RSVP date for ‘A’ list invitations should allow time for sending ‘B’ list invitations at a later date. Resource You can download a template guest list on the Events Office website at www.ox.ac.uk/public_affairs/ events/ 18 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 19
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Agreeing the guest list with a VIPs office Organising the invitations For events hosted or attended by the Chancellor or Vice-Chancellor, or events with University-wide significance, the guest list must be sent to the Vice-Chancellor’s office for review and suggestions in the early stages of planning; in advance of wider circulation and before the invitations are sent out. If you are inviting an external VIP to host the event, you could offer to send a copy of the draft guest list to their office for suggestions if you think it would be appropriate. Sending a ‘hold the date’ Data Protection When circulating the guest list internally or externally, always remove addresses and personal details as it may be possible for other people to access this information. The person who is responsible for managing the guest list should select only the relevant information about accepts, regrets or special requirements to circulate as an update. For some events which are planned well in advance and are of particular significance, a ‘hold the date’ can be sent in advance of the invitations to give guests as much notice as possible. This might be particularly useful for high-profile events, where guests may have very busy diaries or where places are limited and you will have a reserve guest list. You should note the date that a ‘hold the date’ is sent against the relevant guests (if not all) on your guest list for future reference. Sending the invitations Invitations should ideally be sent out eight weeks in advance of the event. Bear in mind that you will need to allow time for designing, proofing, printing and addressing invitations. Managing the guest list Giving one person or office responsibility for compiling and managing the guest list will: Please note: a draft copy of the invitation for events to be hosted by the ViceChancellor/Chancellor should be sent to the Vice-Chancellor’s office for approval before they are printed. • Avoid duplicate invitations being sent to guests • Ensure that all guests receive the same information and that all replies are recorded in one place • Provide a single point of contact for all guests for queries relating to the event This list should be updated as guests reply to event invitations, noting any amendments/requirements that they may have which could affect the planning and organisation of the event, such as dietary requirements or transport needs. The person or office who is managing the list can then circulate the updated list each week (or as frequently as agreed) so that all those involved in organising the event can review the acceptances and regrets as they come in. 20 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 21
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT What to include on or with the invitation Dress codes In addition to the date, time, location and dress code for your event, you should include the following information: Commonly used dress codes, from most to least formal, are: • Who is issuing the invitation, i.e. hosting the event • What they are being invited to, i.e. what is the nature of the event (e.g. concert, lecture, debate), what time the event will begin (and end, if appropriate), will there be drinks/food etc • The RSVP date • The name, contact address, telephone number and email of the person to whom they should reply or address queries • Whether they need to inform you of any special requirements they may have, such as transport, access or dietary • Whether the invitation is just for them or whether they can bring a guest. If they can bring a guest, do they need to let you know who it will be and if so, how should they do this • If the event is ‘invitation only’, state that they need to bring their invitation with them White tie Very formal, usually only used for heads of state dinners and, in Oxford, commemorative and May balls. Men: black tail coat and matching black trousers with a white dress shirt, a low white waistcoat and a white bowtie. Women: full-length evening gowns. Black tie Typically for dinners and other formal evening gatherings where white tie is too formal. Men: black dinner jacket and matching black trousers with a white dress shirt, a low waistcoat or cummerbund and a black bowtie. Women: on a scale from conservative cocktail dresses to full-length evening gowns. Lounge suit/Business dress Often used for evening or business functions including drinks parties, networking events or conferences. Men: Suit with shirt and tie. Women: Smart office wear, preferably a suit. Business attire – gowns will be worn Usually used for ceremonial University events. Members of the University (who are Oxford graduates, members of the Chancellor’s Court of Benefactors or honorary fellows or degree holders) may wear their academic or honorary robes. All other guests to dress as per Business dress guide above. In some cases it may be appropriate to include: • Supplementary information such as maps, places to stay locally, taxi contact Academic dress/gowns All guests may wear academic robes. details, parking arrangements • Reply forms on which guests can specify whether they will or will not be attending. This is particularly useful if there are different elements to the day and some guests may not be staying for the whole event or where numbers are required for transport arrangements e.g. between venues • Information about photographs at the event. Unless it is a public event, you Informal/Smart casual Suitable for more informal events including lectures or garden parties. Tie optional, no jeans, shorts, trainers. Business attire or National dress For international events should ensure that guests are aware that photographs will be taken to avoid issues with permissions. Guests can notify the photographer on the day if they do not wish to be photographed 22 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 23
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Academic Dress Invitation Styles When members of the University are asked to wear academic dress to an event, they should wear subfusc clothing as when attending a university examination, i.e.: Details of the invitation styles most commonly used by the Events Office are outlined below. Please contact the Events Office if you need more information or invitation templates: Men - A dark suit and socks, black shoes, a white bow tie, and plain white shirt and collar Women - A dark skirt or trousers, a white blouse, black tie, black stockings and shoes, and, if desired, a dark coat Guests who are not members of the University, dress should be such as would be appropriate for formal occasions, unless otherwise stated. Candidates serving in HM Forces are permitted to wear uniform together with a gown. (The uniform cap is worn in the street and carried when indoors.) This is taken from the Statutes and Regulations relating to Academic Dress made by the Vice-Chancellor, as Authorised by Council. There is an extensive description of various forms of academic dress available from the University website: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/ps/staff/handbooks/9/9sall.shtml Folded invitation Printed size: A4 folded to A5, designed to open as an invitation card. Colour: White, Weight: at least 250gsm. This can be useful for including larger amounts of information or for longer events, for example, as there is space to include the running order and timings for the day. A5 invitation Printed size: A5, Colour: White, Weight: at least 325gsm. This is used for all nonceremonial events. Large gilt-edged card Printed size: Landscape, width 202mm, height 152mm, Colour: White with gilt-edge, Details: 350 gsm Gateway Gold bevelled edge. This is usually used for larger, formal events such as lectures or events involving a number of different parts. Small gilt-edged card Printed size: Landscape, width 152mm, height 108mm, Colour: White with gilt-edge, Details: 350 gsm Gateway Gold bevelled edge. This is usually used for smaller, formal events such as dinners and ceremonial events. If you have a specific enquiry about the wording for an invitation, please contact the Events Office. The University’s Publications and Web Office may be able to offer advice on invitation design. They have also produced a branding toolkit as a guide on the use of the University logos, texts and colours on printed materials. This can be accessed online at www.ox.ac.uk/toolkit/ Printing and design The Print and Reprographics Unit handles University print and reprographics, as well as some external work. For further information contact reprographics@admin.ox.ac.uk or phone (2)70029. The Publications and Web Office has a list of external printers and designers which is available on request. Email publications@admin.ox.ac.uk 24 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 25
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Addressing invitations Catering Contributors to the guest list are responsible for making sure that the names and addresses of their contacts are up-to-date when they are put forward to be invited to an event. The person who is managing the guest list should make a note on their master list of the date that each invitation was sent for future reference. You may need to put an invitation on hold if a guest is on a reserve list or the address is being confirmed, for example. Remember to highlight this on the guest list so that you don’t forget to send it at a later date. Caterers For clarification on the correct form of address, the Events Office refers to Correct Form by Debrett’s which is a comprehensive guide to forms of address in Britain and overseas, including academics, legal professionals, the peerage, armed forces, and medical, political and religious styles. The Events Office has used a number of local caterers for a range of events who can provide canapés to buffets to large, formal dinners. A list of caterers that have been used for events in the past is available on request. We would be happy to advise you of companies who might be appropriate for your event and budget. In the majority of cases these companies also provide waiting staff for your event as well as a bar service, if required. It is advisable to request sample menus and quotes from at least three different caterers before making a decision. If you are planning a dinner, you should ensure that your caterer is able to produce extra portions of any planned dishes in case you have an unexpected guest, or a guest’s dietary requirements are only received on the day. Managing replies Venue requirements/restrictions Logging RSVP information The guest list should be updated as replies are received, noting any amendments/ requirements which could affect the planning and organisation of the event going forward, such as catering or transport. The person or office who is managing the list can then circulate the updated list each week (or as frequently as agreed) so that all those involved in organising the event can review the acceptances and regrets as they come in. Following up with guests who have not replied Where timing allows, leave a few days to a week after the deadline for replies before contacting guests to find out whether they are planning to attend. If you are planning an event at which guests will wear badges, make additional badges for any guests who have not replied in case they turn up. You should also take some blank badges and a marker pen for other unexpected guests. If you are planning to have food and/or drinks at your event, you should discuss your plans with the venue manager in advance. They will be able to advise you on what will be possible, what has been successful in the past and whether they have the appropriate licences. Agreeing menus When reviewing sample menus from caterers, remember to consider more common dietary requirements, such as vegetarianism and religious dietary requirements, to ensure you have a range of options that cater for everyone. If you are planning a buffet, make sure that the dishes are labelled clearly so that guests can easily identify any dishes that they cannot eat. Larger/public events For events that are open to a wider University audience or to the public, it can be useful to use a sign-up process to give you a rough idea of how many people will be attending. For some events an online registration facility may be appropriate and the Events Office can provide more information on this. If you are not able to have an online facility, you could ask people to send an email requesting places or to pick up hard copy tickets in advance of the event. 26 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 27
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Audio/visual Event staff Identifying requirements Who will you need to help plan the event? If you require audio/visual equipment and think that you might need a more advanced lighting or sound arrangement than that which is available on site, you should discuss this in advance with the venue manager. They may be able to recommend companies who have worked on events there in the past whose experience will be beneficial in planning what to do for your event. For larger events with a team of people involved in organising the event, make sure you all agree your roles and responsibilities early on in the planning stages. Having a detailed plan and timeline will help you co-ordinate different areas of the event planning, particularly where there are a number of people or departments involved. Who will you need on the day? The University’s Media Production Unit has worked on a wide variety of events at different venues around Oxford and may also be able to advise you: www.ox.ac.uk/ publicaffairs/mpu/ Photographers Unless you are planning a public event, there can be issues around permissions to use or reproduce photographs for an event. It is advisable to inform guests prior to the event that there will be a photographer there and request that they should notify the photographer on the day if they do not wish to have their photograph taken. Remember to brief the photographer if there are any particular shots that you would like from the event. It may also be useful to issue them with a badge or other identification so that guests and staff are aware that they are the official photographer. The Publications and Web Office can provide a list of photographers who are used by the University. Email publications@admin.ox.ac.uk 28 Event planning guidelines 2008 In addition to possible catering and audio/visual needs, you may need to consider other staff to work at the event in stewarding or security roles, for instance. This usually depends on the number of guests that you are expecting and the complexity of the event. If you have several presentations happening simultaneously in different rooms, you may need a member of staff present in each room to manage timing and deal with any issues that might arise such as technical faults. Remember, you can’t be in two places at once! Security/stewarding If you think that an element of your event may pose a security risk, for example if you have a high profile or controversial guest speaker, you should contact the University Security Services through the Proctor’s Office. They should be able to advise you on the appropriate level of security and/or stewarding for your event. You can also contact the Events Office to discuss your particular requirements. Event planning guidelines 2008 29
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Transport Publicity Transport requirements If your event is going to be open to the public or University students, for example, you will need to think about how best to advertise to your target audience. University colleges and departments may be able to assist in disseminating information via emails to students or staff or by displaying posters. If your event is open to the public, you could display posters in public places (check first with the administrator) or advertising in local newsletters and newspapers. There are also some local events pages online, such as Daily Info: www.dailyinfo.co.uk If your event requires guests or other attendees to travel, or if any of your guests have specified that they need special transport provision, obtain quotes and book transport with a reliable company as soon as possible. You should make it clear to guests if they will need to travel from one venue to another during the event and let them know whether transport will be provided or not. If you are planning to provide transport, make sure that you know which guests have requested a place on it so that you can tick them off as they board and no-one gets left behind. Transport providers The Events Office has used a number of local transport providers in the past and would be happy to advise you on appropriate companies for your event and budget. The University also has a number of resources which can be useful for advertising certain events. These include The Gazette, Blueprint, Oxford Today and the University website. Please contact the Publications and Web Office for more details on deadlines. It may be appropriate to include some biographical information about a speaker or host in your publicity material. In this case, contact their office in the first instance to find out whether they have standard text which they use for this sort of thing. If they are not able to help or point you in the right direction, you can usually pull together information from the internet. However, you should always make sure that any text you use has been approved by the person in question’s office. Insurance There are several different types and levels of insurance involved in event management that may be applicable to your event. In the first instance, you could discuss what arrangements your venue has already and what additional arrangements you might need. If you are unsure about what you may need, please contact the Events Office. 30 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 31
    • PLANNING YOUR EVENT PLANNING YOUR EVENT Table plans, place cards, badges Badges Table plans and place cards Depending on the size and nature of your event, you may decide that it would be appropriate for guests to wear badges. This can be useful at networking events, for example, but is not usually done for smaller, more intimate events. If the Vice-Chancellor or the Chancellor is hosting your event, you should send them a draft copy of the table plan for the event one week in advance. If you have an external or other VIP hosting the event, it would be good practice to offer a copy to them in advance as well, if appropriate. Usually the host sits in the middle of one of the long sides of a rectangular table, next to the guest speaker, if there is one. You should also think about other internal or external VIPs and where they are placed, as well as any sponsors. Where there is more than one table, it is common practice for each table to have a host, often a senior member of internal personnel. Couples should not be seated next to or directly opposite each other. Ideally they should be seated on opposite sides of the table but offset (one place removed from being directly opposite each other). If you are planning an event at which guests will wear badges, make additional badges for any guests who have not replied in case they turn up. You should also take some blank badges and a marker pen for other unexpected guests. As with place cards, it is not usually necessary to include the guest’s initials or ‘gong’ (i.e. the letters that appear after their name to signify qualifications or honours). You may, however, consider including their job title and/or company or organisation where appropriate. You can order boxes of badges and inserts from stationers or office suppliers. In addition to producing one or more copies of the overall table plan for display at the event so that your guests can find out where they are sitting, it may be appropriate to distribute individual table plans earlier in the event, for example at pre-dinner drinks. This is particularly useful at very large dinners to avoid several hundred people crowding round the table plans at the same time, trying to find out where they are sitting. You will need to provide place cards with names on to go on the table to make it clear where people should sit when they reach the table. These are usually printed on both sides so that the guest can easily find their own place and other guests can identify who they are sitting next to or opposite. It is not usually necessary to include the guest’s initials or ‘gong’ (the letters that appear after their name to signify qualifications or honours). 32 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 33
    • EVENT PLAN CHECKLIST PROPOSAL EVENT PLAN CHECKLIST GUEST LIST VENUE TRANSPORT Discuss and complete budget Agree guest list co-ordinator Research possible venues Obtain quotes Approve proposal Call for suggestions and circulate guest list to relevant parties Agree venue Book transport Reserve all required spaces at venue Confirm contact details and routes Agree event team and roles FINANCES Compile budget Agree final guest list INVITATIONS Catering Other Obtain quotes Signposting Invitation approved Approve menus with hosts and VIPs where appropriate Furniture (e.g. registration desk, lecturn) Invitations designed and printed Design and print menus Discuss proposed dates internally and with VIPs Invitations sent Update caterers on numbers Decorations (e.g. flowers, table cloths) Check proposed date with Events Office Monitor replies Approve budget DATE Agree date VIPs Identify and approach VIP Send event info to VIP office Request VIP profile and special requirements Invitation and accompanying information drafted PUBLICITY Seating requirements Plan seating for lecture/ presentation and inform venue Design and print publicity Draft and approve table plan Circulate to departments, colleges, local press etc Design and print menus Update caterers on numbers Audio/visual Agree music/audio requirements for speeches etc Approach and brief photographer if required Available facilities (e.g. cloakroom, green rooms, parking) Table plans, place cards, badges Agree staffing and security requirements Insurance Licences Emergency procedures EVALUATION Complete evaluation form Circulate form and feedback to commissioner Agree visual requirements e.g. projectors and screens Agree additional lighting requirements 34 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 35
    • DELIVERING YOUR EVENT The delivery of your event, including the layout, plans for setting up and staffing, should be part of the planning process well in advance of the day itself. The more thoroughly you are able to think things through and plan ahead, the more likely the event is to run smoothly and be successful. The run-up to the event • Re-confirm the date, location and timings for the event with the venue, VIP offices, caterers, audio/visual technicians, event staff, transport and any other key people or organisations involved in the event • Make sure that you have confirmed emergency exit procedures with the venue so you, and other event staff, know what to do in the event of a fire or other emergency on the day • Where necessary, produce briefings on VIPs for internal or event staff. Contact the VIPs office in the first instance to find out whether they have standard text which they use for this. If they are not able to help or point you in the right direction, you can usually find information on the internet. However, this information may not be accurate or up-to-date so you should always make sure that any text you use has been approved by the VIP before it is circulated • Prepare table plans, place cards and badges where necessary. If you do what you can in advance, you will allow yourself more time, however it is usually a good idea to print the final table plan last as this is the least simple to amend where as place cards and name badges can be swapped in or out if necessary DELIVERING YOUR EVENT Setting up for the event Try to imagine the venue with the event in full swing when you are setting up for the event to ensure that you provide adequate space and signposting. Do you need to consider: • Stewards/security/first aid • Signposting • A registration desk – badges, programmes etc • Branding for the event such as table cloths, posters, displays • A cloakroom/coat rail • Additional lighting • Presentation plaques/awards/certificates • Reserved seating: If your event includes a dinner with a seating plan, make sure you take any last minute cancellations/additions into account on the day If your event includes a lecture or presentation, make sure that the events staff, hosts, speakers, any other VIPs and their guests have clearly reserved seats with easy access to the stage • Staging and stage furniture such as lecturns, chairs and tables including cloths and flowers • On-stage refreshments for speakers/panellists, e.g. water and glasses • Announcements – will you want to announce dinner or ask guests to take their seats? Make sure that the person who is going to do this knows what they should say, where they should stand and what time they should make the announcement. For large crowds you may need to consider using a microphone or perhaps a gavel or bell 36 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 37
    • DELIVERING YOUR EVENT DELIVERING YOUR EVENT Managing the event on the day Be prepared Day plan Take spare copies of the guest list showing who has accepted, sent their regrets or not replied. Sort the list alphabetically by surname to save yourself time searching for people’s names. It can also be useful to arrange it with those who have accepted and not replied at the beginning of the list with those who have declined the invitation at the end as they are less likely to come (although they do occasionally show up!) It will be useful to compose a day plan which outlines the running order for the event and helps you co-ordinate activities, guests and staff. It clarifies the roles of everyone involved in delivering the event and sets out what is going to happen and where staff need to be at certain times. You can use the day plan as a basis for briefing staff and colleagues. You want to avoid a situation where you are the only person who knows what is happening and who is responsible for different elements of the event. Your day plan should include contact details with mobile phone numbers for individuals and organisations who are involved in the event, such as speakers, hosts, caterers, transport providers, etc. If there is a delay, change of plan or a problem, you will then have all the information that you need to hand. In some cases you may want to carry out a risk assessment. If you think this would be appropriate for your event, please contact the Events Office for more information. Briefing staff Setting aside time to make sure that event staff know what they are doing is essential for making your job easier on the day and helping to ensure that the event runs as smoothly as possible. Try to meet with all staff who will be working on the event in advance at the venue so that you can run through the process together and highlight any potential difficulties or factors that had not yet been considered in the planning, such as the number of staff required for stewarding, the location of the drinks/buffet table, the green room for the VIPs/hosts/speakers. Take spare copies of the table plan, speeches and menus, as well as blank badges and place cards, if relevant to your event, as you may find that plans change at the last minute. If possible, take a name badge and/or place card for any guests who have not replied in case they turn up. Remember to take a good pen for writing on the day. If you are setting up an evening event during the day and therefore not in the office, arrange to check in with the office before the event starts to make sure you are aware of any last minute changes/cancellations to the guest list, for example. If you are not going to be in the office, give your mobile phone number to everyone who is involved in organising and delivering the event so they can get in touch with you. Make sure that you have a list of all the contact details of the staff and contractors involved in the event, as well as any hosts or speakers. Remember to fully charge your mobile phone before an event if it is going to be your main method of contact for the day. Depending on the size of your event, it may be useful to have supervisors for different areas or activities, such as greeting and seating guests, setting up the catering/drinks. Make sure that you book staff as early as possible and are clear about your requirements so that you get the level of resources and skills that you need. Your staff briefing should also include details on what to do in the event of a fire or other emergency and whether there are any staff trained in first aid. 38 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 39
    • DELIVERING YOUR EVENT Don’t panic! DELIVERING YOUR EVENT • A VIP guest or dinner guest turns up who is not on the table plan or the list of those who have accepted, but is on the original list: It is more than likely that something will not go to plan on the day. If this does happen, try not to panic as this will make you less able to think clearly and come up with an appropriate solution. Below are some common examples of problems that can arise at events: • Your VIP/host/speaker is running late: See the VIP section under Planning your Event (p. 13) for advice and information on steps to take to try to avoid this happening in the first place, such as providing traffic information, clear maps and ample time for travel. However, there may well be circumstances beyond your control which mean that the event may have to start late. Keep your host and other speakers informed about what is happening and keep in close contact with the person who is running late so that you can make a judgement as to when they are likely to arrive. If there are a number of speakers, it may be possible to rearrange the order so that the person who is running late will appear last and the event can start on time. If this happens, ask the host to inform the audience so everyone knows what is happening. If the event cannot start without the person who is running late, you may need to delay the start of the event. If possible, make the decision on this before the audience is seated, waiting to begin. Always keep the audience informed if there has been a change of plan. This situation may not be so much of a problem if you are holding a reception or lecture but may prove more difficult if you are holding a dinner. Make sure that you have a full copy of the guest list with you, including everyone who has accepted, sent their regrets or not replied. Firstly and most importantly, if someone turns up who you are not expecting, you should make them feel very welcome and not make them feel embarrassed while you run around checking with other people about why they are there and why they are not on the list. While it is necessary to double check with them that they are there for the event that you are running and have not turned up on the wrong day for a different event, it is not the right time or place to enter into the details of who they replied to, how their reply went astray or who is responsible. The fact is that they are there and you need to make sure that they enjoy the event. You need to make sure that the guest feels comfortable – it does not matter whose fault it is that they are not on the list. Depending on the size of the event and the timing of their arrival, you could take them over and introduce them to the host or perhaps get them a drink. You can then liaise with the caterers to create an extra place in an appropriate space at the table, there is sometimes room at the ends of a long table, and use one of your spare place cards to label it. • A dinner guest has a specific dietary requirement that was not taken into account in planning the menu: Again the most important thing to do in this case is to make sure that the guest does not feel uncomfortable or that they are causing a problem. It is not the right time or place to enter into the details of who they sent the information to, how it went astray or who is responsible. As soon as you have clarified what their requirements are, consult with the caterers to find out what they would be able to provide. 40 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 41
    • DELIVERING YOUR EVENT DELIVERING YOUR EVENT • A guest arrives who is not on the original guest list This can happen for number of reasons and the way that you deal with it will usually depend on the type of event you are having. If they have accompanied someone who is invited and the nature of the event is such that they would be able to join, you may decide that it would be appropriate to let them in. You can then use your spare resources to create name badges etc where necessary. If it is not appropriate or possible for them to join the event, it will usually be sufficient to explain the reasons for this to them, such as limited seating or security protocols. It will be helpful if you have specified on the invitation that the event is ‘invitation only’ to try to avoid this situation arising in the first place. If a guest turns up unaccompanied to an ‘invitation only’ event and is not on the original guest list, you should be quite careful about whether to admit them. If they are an employee of the University, and you think it would be appropriate for them to attend, make sure you check their identification. If it would not be appropriate to admit them, you should explain that this is an ‘invitation only’ event with limited space and unfortunately it is fully subscribed. Try to remain as diplomatic as possible! 42 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 43
    • EVALUATING YOUR EVENT EVALUATING YOUR EVENT Why evaluate? Using your evaluation information Evaluation does not have to be complicated or time-consuming but it is an extremely useful tool for developing planning and delivery processes in the future. By evaluating you are measuring how successful your event was against your aims and proposed outcomes. You can also find out people’s opinions, monitor your spending against your budget and think about what worked well and what didn’t work well, providing useful lessons for future events. This will inform your plans for future events making them more successful and easier to plan. What are you trying to find out through evaluation? How to evaluate your event • Were your team, participants and audience satisfied? There are two useful methods of evaluating your event: • What could you have done differently/better? • Monitor the planning process for your event against your event plan and timeline • What worked well? as you go to find out whether you are keeping to schedule • Evaluate after the event to find out if you achieved your aims. You can do this through feedback from other people who organised or attended the event, including hosts and speakers etc. The Events Office has created a post-event evaluation form which can be downloaded from the website • Did everything go as planned? • If not, why not? What could have been done to change this? • Were your objectives achieved? • What lessons did you learn for next time? What should you do with the information from your evaluation? • Keep it for the next event • Feed back to your managers • Share it with the Events Office Resource You can download an event evaluation template on the Events Office website at www.ox.ac.uk/public_affairs/ events/ 44 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 45
    • RESOURCES RESOURCES Event proposal template Event Proposal - Draft Event Proposal - Draft University of Oxford Events Office University of Oxford Events Office EVENT NAME Notes Organiser’s name Tel. Email DELIVERY Proposed date of event Location Notes Host PURPOSE OF THE EVENT What is the Event? Event aim VIP guests Speech Why are you having the Event? Objectives and key messages of the Event Other content What will happen at the Event? Event format (e.g. reception, dinner, concert, lecture) Print requirements A/V requirements Dress code Who is the Event for? Target audience / guests (and estimate of numbers) Catering requirements Guest list coordinator Security issues Authorisation and sign-off Notes ORGANISATION – Who will plan and run the Event? Event Commissioner/Owner Evaluation Other interested parties Budget Source Budget Estimate 8 July 2008 Confidential 1/2 The Event Proposal Template provides an overview of the key elements of planning and delivering your event. 46 Event planning guidelines 2008 8 July 2008 Confidential 2/2 You can adapt it by creating new sections to detail specific elements of your own event. Event planning guidelines 2008 47
    • RESOURCES Event plan and timeline template RESOURCES Guidelines for completing event plan and timeline template Please note: this template is not comprehensive and is designed to be adapted to your specific needs • Insert your event name where indicated at the top of the template • Insert your event date in the format dd/mm/yy where indicated at the top of the template • Today’s date and the number of weeks to go until the event are calculated automatically • Fill in the left-hand ‘Activity’ column with all the tasks which are relevant to the planning of your particular event. You can use the headers provided such as ‘Set the Date’ and ‘Guest List’ or you can adapt it to a more suitable layout for your event • Identify the person or department that is responsible for each of these tasks in the ‘By Who?’ column • Note the deadline for completion of each task in the ‘By When?’ column If you would like to complete the timeline element of the template as well: • Insert the date that each week leading up to the event commences in the ‘Week’ row • Complete the ‘Weeks to Go’ row, counting down from the number which was automatically calculated in the ‘Weeks to go until event’ field • If required, fill in the University term week numbers in the ‘Term Dates’ row. This information can be very useful when thinking about the numbers of students and staff who may be available for an event • Against each task in your ‘Activity’ column, colour the field of the Week which corresponds to the date which you have entered in the ‘By When’ column 48 Event planning guidelines 2008 Event planning guidelines 2008 49
    • RESOURCES RESOURCES Event budget template Guidelines for completing Event Budget Template Event Budget Event name: Event date: • Insert your event name where indicated at the top of the template Example Event 2nd July 2008 ITEM BUDGET • Insert your event date in the format dd/mm/yy where indicated at the top of the ACTUAL SURPLUS/ DEFICIT INV REC'D INV APPV'D template NOTES • Insert the total budget you have available to spend on the event under ACTUAL INCOME: eg sponsorship INCOME. Remember to include all availalble funds including those from external sources, such as sponsorship £5,000.00 EXPENDITURE: VENUE: - hire charge £1,000.00 £750.00 £250.00 7/7/08 CATERING - food - drinks - waiting staff £1,200.00 £600.00 £0.00 £1,500.00 £400.00 £0.00 -£300.00 £200.00 £0.00 • Enter the amount that you are budgeting for different elements of the event in 5/7/08 PHOTOGRAPHY - external - internal the BUDGET column against the appropriate area. These figures should be based on quotes and research • If you have specific costs which are not included on this general template, insert £0.00 £0.00 AUDIO/VISUAL - external - internal 8/7/08 £0.00 £0.00 TRANSPORT - coach hire - car hire - other £400.00 £50.00 £350.00 £20.00 a row and enter a header name for the cost and appropriate budget figures • When you know your exact costs for each element, enter this figure in the ACTUAL column against the appropriate header £50.00 £30.00 £0.00 PRINTING - Internal - External £0.00 STAFFING - external - internal £0.00 £0.00 SECURITY - internal - external £0.00 £0.00 FLOWERS deficit on your spending for each element. In other words whether you spent less or more than you had budgeted. A surplus will be indicated as a positive figure and a deficit as a negative figure £0.00 £0.00 PUBLICITY - advertising • The budget template will automatically calculate whether there is a surplus or £0.00 CONSUMABLES - stationary - phones TOTAL EXPENDITURE INCOME LESS EXPENDITURE £3,250.00 £3,020.00 • The template will also calculate your total budget, total actual costs and work out whether you had a surplus or deficit between the two over all your costs. If this figure is positive it means you remained within the budget that you set yourself; if it is negative then you spent more than you had budgeted for the event • Finally the template will subtract your total actual costs for the event from your income for the event. If this figure is positive it means you did not spend all the money available for the event; if it is negative then you spent more than you had available £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £230.00 • You can also use the template to monitor the invoices for each cost as they are £1,980.00 received and approved to ensure that all costs are paid within the agreed period usually 30 days 8/7/08 50 Event planning guidelines 2008 1/1 Event planning guidelines 2008 51
    • RESOURCES RESOURCES Event evaluation template EVENT EVALUATION SHEET SUMMARY: FEEDBACK: Event Name: Event Type: Please tick appropriate: What worked? Ceremonial  Reception  Launch  Lunch  Opening  Dinner  Presentation  Press  _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ Lecture  Sports  _______________________________________________________ Other (please specify):_________________________________________ What didn’t work? Venue/s: Date: _______________________________________________________ Budget: _______________________________________________________ EVENT DETAIL: _______________________________________________________ Host: Speaker/Presenter/ Lecturer: Music: What could be done differently? Caterer: _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ Other features: Nos. Guests: _______________________________________________________ External: Internal: OUTCOMES: PROJECT TEAM: Press & Events Office coordinator/s: Communications: Commissioner/Client: _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ Contact Details: Tel: _______________________________________________________ Development: Email: _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ FEEDBACK: _______________________________________________________ Statistics/attendees: Impact on Objectives/ Key Issues for Client: Which objectives _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ met? _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ 8/7/08 1/2 The Event evaluation template covers some of the key questions that should be asked after an event for an effective evaluation of its success and to inform future planning. 52 Event planning guidelines 2008 8/7/08 2/2 Remember to look at all elements of planning and delivering the event such as consultation processes and working relationships, in addition to logistical successes or difficulties. Event planning guidelines 2008 53
    • Events Office University of Oxford University Offices Wellington Square Oxford OX1 2JD T: 01865 280524 E: events@admin.ox.ac.uk W: www.ox.ac.uk/public_affairs/events/