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RSuite User Conf Keynote

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Keynote presentation I gave at the Really Strategies, Inc. RSuite/CMS user conference in Philadelphia in October, 2007.

Keynote presentation I gave at the Really Strategies, Inc. RSuite/CMS user conference in Philadelphia in October, 2007.

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    RSuite User Conf Keynote RSuite User Conf Keynote Presentation Transcript

    • Unlock Content™ Content Management: Whence It Came, Where It Went Dave Kellogg Chief Executive Officer 10/9/07 Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 1
    • In The Beginning, There Were DBMSs And they didn’t allow a flexible query mechanism New question  dump, redesign, reload Codd said let there be ad hoc query … and there was ad hoc query The relational DBMS was born I worked with Ingres in 1983 … and then at Ingres in 1985 One day I saw “Positioning” (Ries and Trout) on John Newton’s desk (Take a word and own it in the mind of the customer) A few years later there was Documentum Documents (Aside: And a few years after that, Perforce) Fast, configuration management Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 2
    • Document Management Mission Do everything you can with documents on top of an RDBMS that doesn’t even have BLOBs yet Bolt in a search engine later Manage opaque, coarse chunks of content It’s all about the meta-data Author, date, version, checked in/out, approved Workflow / process Leave documents on the file system Or in BLOBs Or in CLOBs Great for regulated processes New drug approval process Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 3
    • Beyond Document Management Records management The practice of identifying, classifying, archiving, preserving, and destroying records Imaging Capture, store, and reprint images of documents Web content management Database-driven dynamic websites The one that got away from a DCTM viewpoint Collaboration Technologies to enable people to work together Portal Central access point for corporate information Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 4
    • Enterprise Content Management Consolidation wave hits Worst-of-breed strategies Leader in sub-category N buys runner-ups in other N-1 CIOs like it Standardization Experts and implementers not so much “ECM is a myth” viewpoint Encourage best-of-breed selection for important projects Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 5
    • ECM Today 2nd wave / level of consolidation Stellent  Oracle FileNet  IBM Documentum  EMC Hummingbird  OpenText Microsoft The little guys get snapped up The big guys need to spend next few years on suite reconciliation Microsoft chews up the bottom with SharePoint Markets splits to a few big suites complemented by content-enabled vertical apps (a Gartner-ism) Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 6
    • Publishers and ECM An uncomfortable relationship Since content is a publisher’s business, you’d think that They’d be the alpha users of ECM systems Vendors would embrace publishers and publishing But it ain’t so ECM was built on the back of pharma (new drug approvals) and process manufacturing Regulated processes and controls Not “content as an asset”  the great irony ECM isn’t about the C, it’s about the M “Publishing is a small, conservative market that’s hard to sell to” Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 7
    • So Where Do We Go From Here? Let’s finally make it about the C XML Markup for content XQuery Database-style queries on content Text and structural constraints XML content servers (Mark Logic) Special-purpose DBMSs designed for XML content Publishing CMS (RSuite/CMS) CMS built for publishers Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 8
    • What Can You Do With This Stuff? Build a centralized XML content repository Take content on an “as is” basis regarding schema Clean up that XML in an application-driven, lazy way Citation tracker  clean up citation metadata No big bang required Build content applications (aka new information products/services) Integrate Enrich Contextualize Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 9
    • Integrate Content Application-driven, not infrastructure driven Determine what application you’re building License, acquire, scrape required complementary content to build it Transform and normalize the schema XSLT XQuery Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 10
    • Enrich Content Lazy XML clean up Application driven Either smart content or smart queries Your choice where to invest Enrichment techniques Manual / offshore Text mining technologies XQuery-based heuristics Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 11
    • Contextualize Content Publishers need to put content in context Of what? Role- and task-aware content applications I know who you are and what you’re doing Contextual design methodologies Observation Agile development Build quickly, iterate, expose to users Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 12
    • What Features Can These Apps Have? Text search Complex content query Faceted navigation Content analytics Dynamic tagclouds Workflow / process support Custom publishing Print on demand through PDF Integrated web / repository search Multiple device support Web 2.0 features: diggs, tags, comments, annotations Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 13
    • What’s It All About? In a word, agility In an uncertain world You cannot predict the future But you can help shape it And you can respond to it quickly “Fail early and often” Finally, publishers should – imho – work with partners focused on publishing Better service driven by strategic focus Domain expertise / knowledge of state-of-the-art Publishers and the publishing function aren’t the same thing Copyright © 2007 Mark Logic Corporation, All Rights Reserved Slide 14