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Turban and its importance in sikhism

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    Turban and its importance in sikhism Turban and its importance in sikhism Presentation Transcript

    • bimhrdName : Ramanpreet SinghClass: PGDM BRoll no:HRD09-6157
    • TURBANAND ITS IMPORTANCEIN SIKHISM
    • HISTORY
      Turban is and has been an inseparable part of a sikh’s life. Since Guru Nanak Dev ji, the founder of sikhism, all sikhs have been wearing turban. All sikh gurus wore a turban. The sikh rehatmaryada (sikh code of conduct) specifically says that all sikhs must wear a turban.
    • IMPORTANCE OF TURBAN
      UNIQUE IDENTITY
      HOLINESS AND SPIRITUALITY
      TURBAN AS A ROBE OF HONOUR
      PAGG VATAUNI (EXCHANGE OF TURBAN)
      SYMBOL OF RESPONSIBILITY
      HONOUR AND SELF RESPECT
      HIGH MORAL VALUES
      KINGLY TURBAN – SIGN OF SARDARI
    • UNIQUE IDENTITY
      It provides Sikhs a unique identity. You will see only Sikhs wearing Turban in western countries. If a Sikhs likes to become one with his/her Guru, he/she must look like a Guru (wear a Turban). Guru Gobind Singh Ji has said, “Khalsameroroophaikhaas. Khalse me haukaronivas.”
      Khalsa (Sikh) is a true picture of mine. I live in a Khalsa.
    • BINA PAGG DE NAHI PEHCHAAN HUNDI
      BHAAVE HOWE BANDA LAKH HAZAAR JI
      LAKHAN VICHO HOWE IKKO PAGG WALA
      LOKI AAKHDE “SAT SRI AKAAL” SARDAR JI
    • HOLINESS AND SPIRITUALITY
      Turban is a symbol of spirituality and holiness in Sikhism. When Guru Ram DassJi left for heavenly abode, his elder son PirthiChand wore a turban, which is usually worn by an elder son when his father passes away. (In the same manner) Guru Arjan Dev was honored with the turban of Guruship.
    • DASAM DWAAR
      The DasamDwaar also Dasamadvara is the Tenth Door or Gate in addition to the physical body having nine openings (two eyes, ears, nostrils, mouth and the organs of procreation and excretion). It is at the top of the head, the Brahmarandhra that opens upon Kundalini awakening when we feel the Cool Breeze. Sikhs believe that there are 10 'gates' to the body; Some understand 'gates' as another word for 'chakras' or energy centres. However, gates are physical opening which are also top most energy level is the called the tenth gate or dasamdwaar where AnhadBani: The unstruck sound current of the Shabad vibrates.
    • TURBAN AS A ROBE OF HONOR
      The highest honour that a sikh religious organization can bestow upon an individual is a Siropa. It is a blessing of the guru which is bestowed upon a person who has devoted a major portion of his/her life for the welfare of sikhism or for humanity in general. Sometimes a siropa is also bestowed upon the families of a sikh martyrs.
    • PAGG VATAUNI (EXCHANGE OF TURBAN)
      PaggVatauni ("exchange of turban") is a Punjabi custom, in which the people exchange turbans with their closest friends. Once they exchange turbans they become friends for life and forge a permanent relationship. They take a solemn pledge to share their joys and sorrows under all circumstances. Exchanging turban is a glue that can bind two individuals or families together for generations
    • SYMBOL OF RESPONSIBILITY
      RasamPagri ("turban ceremony") is a ceremony in North India. RasamPagri takes place, when a man passes away and his oldest son takes over the family responsibilities by tying the turban in front of a large gathering. It signifies that now he has shouldered the responsibility of his father and he is the head of the family
    • HONOUR AND SELF RESPECT
      The turban is also a symbol of honor and self-respect. In the Punjabi culture, those who have selflessly served the community are traditionally honoured with turbans.
    • KINGLY TURBANSIGN OF SARDARI
      Earlier only royal people and people of high castes used to wear turban and minorities were not allowed to wear turbans.
    • TURBAN FOR WOMEN
    • TURBAN OUTSIDE INDIA
    • TYPES OF TURBANS
      PATKA
      KESKI
      DASTAAR
      PAGG
      DUMALLA
    • PATKA
      Patka is a Sikh head covering which is worn by many Sikh children in preference to its bigger brother the turban. The Patka is also worn by many adult Sikhs as a under-turban as well. This under-turban may be kept at bed-time as well, when the turban proper is taken off. This is knotted at the top to keep the hair intact.
      In fact PATKA is more popular with young Sikhs at school. The patka is a simple cloth head covering, consisting of about two square feet of fabric with strings to secure it. The patka is usually worn by Sikh youths, or in the place of a turban by less traditional adult Sikhs.
    • KESKI
    • DASTAAR
    • PAGG
    • SIMPLE DUMALLA
    • SHASTARDHARI DUMALLA
    • Why choose a Turban?
      The turban is our Guru's gift to us. It is how we crown ourselves as the Singhs and Kaurs who sit on the throne of commitment to our own higher consciousness. For men and women alike, this projective identity conveys royalty, grace, and uniqueness. It is a signal to others that we live in the image of Infinity and are dedicated to serving all. The turban doesn't represent anything except complete commitment. When you choose to stand out by tying your turban, you stand fearlessly as one single person standing out from six billion people.
    • Talwarautte ne saadejanamhoye, Khandenaalkamaiyaanyaarian ne, Avennilokisanusardarkehnde, Sir dekelayiyaansardariyan ne...
    • THANK YOU!!