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Hireko Golf Basics of Golf Club Epoxy and Shaft Installation
 

Hireko Golf Basics of Golf Club Epoxy and Shaft Installation

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No glue and stick techniques will be taught here. Hireko’s Technical Director Jeff Summitt will thoroughly discuss not only the different types of epoxies and their terms, but also how to properly ...

No glue and stick techniques will be taught here. Hireko’s Technical Director Jeff Summitt will thoroughly discuss not only the different types of epoxies and their terms, but also how to properly install the shaft so the club stays together, reduce the likelihood of breakage and still allows a clubmaker to repair the club in the future. For many clubmakers, epoxy mixing and application is often an ignored subject.

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    Hireko Golf Basics of Golf Club Epoxy and Shaft Installation Hireko Golf Basics of Golf Club Epoxy and Shaft Installation Presentation Transcript

    • PROFESSIONAL GOLF CLUBS AT DOWN TO EARTH PRICES The Basics of Epoxy and Shaft Installation with Jeff Summitt Technical Director, Hireko Golf Thursday August 13, 2009 2-3PM Eastern Standard Time Audio settings are set on listen only. Please post questions in the upper right hand corner Chat box. Question & Answer period will be at end of webinar. www.hirekogolf.com 800 367-8912
    • EPOXY: Creating a Long Lasting Bond Glue – One-part instant adhesive not recommended for any golf club assembly Epoxy – Two-part adhesive comprised of a resin and hardener mixed using a certain ratio Must provide sufficient strength but also must be able to be removed when necessary Stick to epoxies sold by component suppliers
    • Choosing Between Epoxies Slow Set – Normally 24 hour epoxy that provide ample time for assembly and the highest strength Fast Set – 30, 60, 90 minute or two hour epoxy, also known as quick setting or Tour setting epoxy. Designed for convenience but there can be a drop off in strength verses slow setting epoxy. Clubmaking is not like fast food; slow is the best choice except in special situations
    • Terms for Epoxy Working Time – The time epoxy remains pliable before you are unable to apply it evenly on the surfaces. Setting Time – The time the epoxy becomes rigid but not fully cured Curing Time – The time required for the epoxy to achieve its maximum strength and rigidity PROFESSIONAL GOLF CLUBS AT DOWN TO EARTH PRICES Sales 800 367-8912 Free Technical Service 800 942-5872
    • Mixing Epoxy Weight: Exact method but more time consuming Volume: Eye-ball method Quick and easy
    • Shafting Beads Use only when the shaft is slightly loose in the hosel Scrape some epoxy aside and mix in shafting beads 4-6% by volume, do not add to the entire batch or increase the proportion PROFESSIONAL GOLF CLUBS AT DOWN TO EARTH PRICES Sales 800 367-8912 Free Technical Service 800 942-5872
    • Bottles, Individual Packets, Cartridges With Optional Epoxy Gun
    • Mixing Stick / Shaft Method Left: Mixing Stick Right: Shaft Method Mix thoroughly – at least 15 seconds or more Avoid using excessive epoxy otherwise it WILL eventually lead to premature breakage PROFESSIONAL GOLF CLUBS AT DOWN TO EARTH PRICES Sales 800 367-8912 Free Technical Service 800 942-5872
    • Clean up and align the shafts Thoroughly wipe off excess epoxy – neatness is a virtue! Align the silkscreen and find a place to set aside clubs so they are undisturbed while the epoxy sets
    • Do’s Use only an appropriate epoxy, not glue, for the job Shafts should be properly abraded Clean all parts from oil or epoxy reside in the case of re-shafting or repair Make sure to completely mix epoxy as it is not possible to over mix. Use epoxy sparingly, don’t think that “if a little is good, a lot is better” Shaft beads may help be needed to act as a filler when shaft is slightly loose inside the hosel, but don’t use epoxy to take up large differences such as trying to install a .335” shaft into a .350” hosel or a .355” taper tip shaft into a .370” parallel bore as the epoxy will not hold. Carefully mix epoxy in the proper proportion Clean up left over epoxy from the club as well as your workbench Don’ts Don’t rush your work even if you have done it a thousand times before Less epoxy cure in cold temperatures unless you factor that into when they can be safely hit Move assembled parts before they begin to set up PROFESSIONAL GOLF CLUBS AT DOWN TO EARTH PRICES Sales 800 367-8912 Free Technical Service 800 942-5872
    • PROFESSIONAL GOLF CLUBS AT DOWN TO EARTH PRICES THANK YOU FOR ATTENDING! A link pointing you to today’s webinar will be emailed to you in a few hours. Jeff Summitt,Technical Director jsummitt@hirekogolf.com Technical Support 800 942-5872 www.HirekoGolf.com Sales 800 367-8912