• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Email Security, The Essence of Secure E-mail
 

Email Security, The Essence of Secure E-mail

on

  • 2,124 views

When can I consider my e‐mail to be secure? IT-Whitepaper for Haaga‐Helia University of Applied Sciences by Ralph van der Pauw

When can I consider my e‐mail to be secure? IT-Whitepaper for Haaga‐Helia University of Applied Sciences by Ralph van der Pauw

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,124
Views on SlideShare
2,106
Embed Views
18

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
59
Comments
0

4 Embeds 18

http://ralphvanderpauw.com 11
http://ralphvanderpauw.nl 4
http://www.vanderpauw.co 2
http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Email Security, The Essence of Secure E-mail Email Security, The Essence of Secure E-mail Document Transcript

    •        Haaga‐Helia University of Applied Sciences E‐mail Security When can I consider my e‐mail to be secure?  Ralph van der Pauw – a1000513  27/4/2010   
    • Table of Contents  What is e‐mail? ........................................................................................................................................ 2  Simple Mail Transfer Protocol ......................................................................................................... 2  Post Office Protocol & Internet Message Access Protocol ............................................................. 2 Why should e‐mail be secure? ................................................................................................................ 4  How the internet works .................................................................................................................. 4  Common sense ................................................................................................................................ 5 Which threats exist in e‐mail? ................................................................................................................. 6  Trojans ............................................................................................................................................. 6  Viruses ............................................................................................................................................. 6  Worms ............................................................................................................................................. 7 How can these threats be eliminated? ................................................................................................... 9  Antivirus software ........................................................................................................................... 9  Think before you act  ....................................................................................................................... 9  .Which vulnerabilities exist in email? ..................................................................................................... 11  Privacy ........................................................................................................................................... 11  Spam & Phishing ............................................................................................................................ 12 How can these vulnerabilities be reduced? .......................................................................................... 13  Encryption (SSL, TLS & PGP) .......................................................................................................... 13  Spamfilters  .................................................................................................................................... 13  . Awareness ..................................................................................................................................... 14 Sources .................................................................................................................................................. 16       1
    • What is e‐mail?  E‐mail is the abbreviation of ‘Electronic mail’, a now standardized word used to describe the protocol of exchanging and storing digital messages. Though there had already been some programs made for exchanging messages between direct connected computers, the first foundations for e‐mail had been invented in the early 1970’s by Ray Tomlinson. Shortly after the creation of the ARPANET (beginning of the internet) he created two programs called SNDMSG and READMAIL to either send or read mail. In 1971 he updated his SNDMSG application by adding a program that could copy files through a network connection which completed the creation of the first functional e‐mail client (Hardy, 1996). Tomlinson assigned every client address based on the same structure we use nowadays. In his case it was username@usercomputer, with ‘username’ being the client’s name and ‘usercomputer’ the computer where the client was located (Black, 2010). Over the years not much has changed other than that ‘usercomputer’ changed into the name of the provider (domain name). Furthermore an extension is added behind the domain defining a country or sector. Still the foundation of Tomlinson’s work exists in the communication that we find so common in our day to day life.  An e‐mail is basically a text message containing a header and a body. The header is meant for metadata such as the sender, recipient, date and other information defining the content.  The body contains the content written by the sender which can either be plain text or HTML coded content. Most e‐mail clients support HTML bodies in e‐mail messages, but due to the existence of older e‐mail clients, a link to a webpage or a text version of the body is still sent along.  Email used to be a text only protocol, but with the development of MIME (Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions) it is now possible to send rich multimedia content such as attachments along. MIME is a way to convert files into plain text, so it can be sent with the e‐mail messages. Once the message arrives with the recipient, the text is converted back to the file it was before it had been sent (Tschabitscher, 2010). Simple Mail Transfer Protocol The protocol used to send an e‐mail message is called SMTP, meaning Simple Mail Transfer Protocol. When the client sends an e‐mail, it’s sent by the e‐mail client to the SMTP server which is usually hosted by either your (online‐)mail or internet service provider. The worldwide standard for the SMTP port is port number 25, only being used to send e‐mail.  After the SMTP server connected with your mail client a conversation is initiated containing both the address of the recipient and the address of the sender. The recipient address is broken down into the client name and the domain name. If the domain had been the same as the domain used to send the mail, the SMTP server would pass the messages on to the POP/IMAP server. In case a different domain is used, the SMTP server connects to the DNS (Domain Name Server) and will ask for the unique internet web address (IP: Internet Protocol address) of the SMTP server for that domain. The SMTP server connects with the other SMTP server to transfer the message to its server. The message is then placed in the virtual mailbox of the recipient.  In reality the delivery of the message between two SMTP servers takes a bit more time and steps but this process will be explained when we cover the internet and package sniffing (Brain, 2008). Post Office Protocol & Internet Message Access Protocol There are two different protocols for receiving e‐mail messages. The oldest and simplest protocol is called POP or POP3 (Post Office Protocol). The transfer process is remarkably simple: When a person   2
    • uses his or her e‐mail client, the client logs in on the POP3 server using port 110 and then uses the LIST command to see if there are any messages that have to be retrieved. If there are new messages available the e‐mail client retrieves the messages from the server using the RETR command after which the virtual mailbox is empty again and all new messages are stored on the client’s computer. The IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol) is a bit more advanced because it keeps your mail on the mail server and lets the client download copies of the new messages to cache it on the machine. When a new message is read the mail client sends (when connected to the internet) a command to the IMAP server so the message on the server can be marked as read too. This way you are able to keep you mail synchronized in more places (Brain, 2008). Disadvantages of IMAP for companies might be that the size of the virtual mailbox can take up a lot of unnecessary space on the company’s host server. Nowadays POP3 can also support the possibility to keep a copy of you messages on the server, but IMAP still covers a more advanced ground in the mail protocol being able to change the status of the message on the server to for example ‘read’.      3
    • Why should e‐mail be secure?  E‐mail has become one of the biggest ways of communication. With 90% of the United States citizens online to read or send e‐mail, it is considered the most popular form of communication in both corporate as well as personal communication. 57% of these citizens use e‐mail on a day to day basis for it has become part of their daily routine (Brownlow, 2009). Unfortunately that´s one of the reasons it has become insecure. E‐mail has become a part of our day to day routine which for most people has made it a routine they no longer pay attention to.  The success factor of e‐mail lies in the fact that it is simple, cheap, relatively fast and has become something universal everybody is able to use. The total number of e‐mails send in 2009 has been estimated around 90 trillion. This means every day 247 million e‐mails per day are sent and received by an estimated 1.4 billion e‐mail users around the world (Pingdom, 2010). We take this form of communication for granted and start using it for almost everything we would like to talk about. Little do we know how secure our communications really are. While the number of e‐mail clients is rapidly increasing, the increase of hacking attempts on the internet has increased even more. Security company Symantec shows how the number of infected computers in 2009 has increased with 71% compared to the year before. Every second several hundreds of attempts are made to confiscate sensitive information or to infect a computer with malicious code. Every 4.5 seconds one of these attempts succeeds. These statistics show how a, to most people, seemingly innocent environment just isn’t that innocent at all. Internet grows as a common necessity in everyone’s life, but most users lose track how it also grows to be a platform that can be abused in many different ways. How the internet works Asking a regular e‐mail user how his or her e‐mail will actually be delivered to the recipient and what it can be exposed to, will point out how unknown the e‐mail traffic actually is. As explained before, the SMTP server will try to connect to the recipients SMTP server, but the sending process of this email is not done by directly transferring the message server to server. This is not how the internet works. Packages are sent in an assumed direction where they are being received by other servers who keep passing them on to the right direction, so called ‘routing’. When a packet is received by one of these routers, the packet header is examined and the router searches its routing information table (RIT) for an address of a router closer to where the recipient’s mail server is located (Wilson, 1997). More shocking is that when your email is not encrypted, which it usually isn’t, it is very easy for these servers to read the content of your e‐mail if they would actually want to. The correct term for scanning these packets along the e‐mail route is packet sniffing. If your e‐mails are not being encrypted they are sent as clear text past several routers who then have the ability to intercept and read them. Not just sending an e‐mail can put you in a vulnerable spot. When you are logging in on your POP3 or IMAP4 server, the log‐in information is initially sent as clear text. This means with packet sniffing methods your username and password can be read (Theall, 2004). Now consider the number of people that use the same password for their e‐mail client as access to their back account, it could become a lucrative business. Nowadays most e‐mail clients support encryption for these log‐in   4
    • connections but there are still quite a lot of mail servers that do not use any encryption at all which leaves plaintext log‐in information unsecure.  Common sense In analyzing e‐mail security and direct threats to the mailbox we find ourselves defining two different fields of prevention. There are on one side the technical aspects (like the encryption and sniffing, mentioned before) and then there is common sense. Common sense is an aspect that can’t be prevented as easily as the technical aspects in e‐mail security. Assuming most of the people do not know where their e‐mail goes after pressing the sending button, they usually aren’t that aware to protect their mailbox with some common sense.  There is a big necessity for securing both your mailbox and your internet traffic. As mentioned before it is the number one form of communication in both private and corporate sector. The amount of sensitive information that is being sent through e‐mails is gigantic. Summed up from personal information like bank transactions and private matters to company secrets and classified documents. It is really not that hard to intercept and read these e‐mails. Of course methods like packet sniffing and breaking in to someone’s mailbox are still illegal, but that does not keep certain people from trying it.       5
    • Which threats exist in e‐mail?  With threats we are not focusing so much on the privacy issues of e‐mail, but more on technical dangers of receiving e‐mail. Most companies think they secure themselves with a firewall which would make unauthorized access to their intranet impossible. Unfortunately this is not entirely true, several attack methods exist that can bypass this firewall. Most importantly firewalls do not check the content of e‐mail messages that are being sent and received by the persons who are authorized to use this intranet (GFI Software, 2009).  In the last quarter of 2009, Symantec internet Security Company added 921,143 new malicious code signatures to their database (Pingdom, 2010). This is dangerous because the largest amount of the internet users still are ignorant about the internet´s capabilities and rely too much on their own ´false´ assumptions. This will put them in an unsecure position surrounded by millions of pieces of malicious code. Trojans A big threat in receiving e‐mails, especially with attachments, is a Trojan. Trojans – short for Trojan horses ‐ are parts of code hidden in a useful little application that locates itself on your harddrive. . They got their name from the horse of Troy in the legendary ancient story where Greek soldiers had hidden themselves inside a big wooden horse, allegedly built by Odysseus as a gift for the goddess Pallas Athena and left outside the gates of the city of Troy. Once the Greek had left (so they made it look like) and the Trojans had broken down a section of the city wall to haul the giant horse into their city, the wooden horse opened up and the Greek soldiers conquered Troy. Trojans do not automatically spread themselves, they are part of something and the user is the person that accepts and activates the malicious code without knowing it. They usually spread by e‐mail and sometimes through p2p (person to person) networks (Petri, 2009). What a Trojan actually does is it opens up your PC to other users through a backdoor in the code. A Trojan has access to copy, remove or change files on your harddrive and it can take control of your computer’s hardware. Usually Trojans are used to add your computer as a so called ‘zombie’ to a botnet. A botnet is a large network of infected computers that can be used to create mass attacks to a different computer or a server. The attacks are called ´Distributed Denial Of Service´ (DDOS) attacks, all the zombie computers in the bot‐network are used to send requests to a single server with the intention to make it crash. Apart from DDOS attacks your computer can also be used as a spambot to send large amounts of spam e‐mails to different e‐mail addresses. The spambot ‘crawls’ the worldwide web for new e‐mail addresses to sell these e‐mail addresses to companies for spam purposes. Trojans can function for a long time on your computer without you even knowing it; this is what makes them so dangerous.  Viruses “CNN reported in January 2004 that the MyDoom virus cost companies about US$250 million in lost productivity and tech support expenses, while NetworkWorld (September 2003) cited studies that placed the cost of fighting Blaster, SoBig.F, Wechia and other email viruses at US$3.5 billion for US companies alone” (GFI Software, 2009). Computer‐viruses are most likely the biggest threat in sending and receiving e‐mails. They are besides that also the biggest cost‐expense. Once a computer has been infected by a virus it is usually   6
    • impossible to recover anything of the data and you are lucky when reinstalling the operating system does the trick. A computer virus exists from pieces of executable code that can copy themselves and infect a computer. Computer viruses have many ways to spread, e‐mail being one of the fastest and easiest ways. A virus always attaches to an executable file and ‐ like a Trojan ‐ can only spread by human cause.  A virus can be either a little annoying or a huge problem to your computer system. Once infected and triggered, a virus has access to your harddrive and operating system and can corrupt or delete your data. The severity depends on the type of virus your computer is infected with. Types of viruses Each virus type has a different way to infect your computer. We recognize 6 virus types in general (Spamlaws, 2009; Kamat, 2001).   Program viruses: A program virus is triggered when the executable file (known extensions are  .BIN, .COM, .EXE, .OVL, .DRV) carrying the virus is opened. Once active, the virus will copy  itself and tries to spread itself in different programs on the computer.   Boot viruses: These viruses infect floppy or master boot records on the harddisk. The virus  replaces the boot record program (This is the program that loads the OS (operating system)  in the memory) by copying it elsewhere on the disk or overwriting it. This way the booting  process is corrupted and the virus has direct access to the computer’s memory.   Multipartite viruses: this virus is a combination of a Boot virus and Program virus. Once  triggered it corrupts your program files after which it will affect the boot record. The next  time you boot your computer it is able to spread through your memory and infect your local  drive and programs.   Stealth viruses: This virus is able to hide itself to prevent detection from antivirus software.  The virus has several tricks up its sleeve such as concealing itself in the computer’s memory  or changing its file size.    Polymorphic viruses: These viruses adept to the system by changing their binary pattern so  they are harder to detect by anti‐virus software. The binary pattern of a virus is more or less  its signature from which antivirus programs can detect them.   Macro viruses: this virus is based on the macro language which is a program language used  by applications like Word and Excell. When a virus is coded in the macro‐language, it sticks to  a document such as a word or excel document. Every time a new file is created with the  application, the file is infected with the virus. Worms Worms are a lot like viruses but unlike a virus they can spread without human intervention. The worm can for instance be able to send itself to all the people in your address book. Worms have the capability to travel across your network and duplicating themselves. “The biggest danger with a worm is its capability to replicate itself on your system, so rather than your computer sending out a single worm, it could send out hundreds or thousands of copies of itself, creating a huge devastating effect” (Beal, 2009). Just like a computer virus and a Trojan horse it needs to be triggered by a human action before it can become active. In this case worms are usually received concealed with something that brings up the attention of the computer user, a good example is the ILOVEYOU worm.    7
    • In 2000 the ILOVEYOU virus had infected millions of computers all over the world. It soon got the name ILOVEYOU‐virus although its architecture defined it as a worm. The worm was hidden in an attachment to an e‐mail message with the subject “ILOVEYOU”. The attachment called “LOVE‐LETTER‐FOR‐YOU.TXT.vbs” made people very curious and lured the user into clicking it and thereby activating the worm. After opening the attachment the worm sent a copy of itself to everyone in the address book and made some malicious changes to the computer system. Because of the enormous amount of e‐mail messages being sent at the same time, a lot of POP servers crashed. The worm had a gigantic impact on the world causing an estimated 5.5 billion dollars of damage (Lemos, 2000).         8
    • How can these threats be eliminated?  You can never entirely protect yourself from viruses, Trojans and worms. But you can do a really good job by relying on the right anti‐virus software and handling suspicious e‐mails accordingly.  Antivirus software The right anti‐virus software will make sure the majority of these threats will be picked up by scanning the incoming mail and outgoing mail. The most popular anti‐virus programs have a detection rate between 95%‐99%, which proves they don’t entirely protect you from all the existing threats (Mathews, 2009). Nonetheless they do a good job filtering out most of the malicious mails. Always make sure your anti‐virus definitions are up to date. Most anti‐virus software updates itself when the computer boots but do make sure you have the latest updates installed on your computer. When you use an e‐mail client on your desktop, make sure your anti‐virus program supports inbound as well as outbound e‐mail scanning. The most popular software suits do so, but it’s still important to make sure that when receiving your mail you know it has been filtered through. The importance of outbound e‐mail scanning lies in the fact that you don’t hurt your recipients by accidently mailing them malicious attachments or links. As mentioned before, once a worm has been activated it can copy itself and send these copies to your address book. This is where outbound e‐mail scanning comes in place. It picks up the connection made to the SMTP server and scans the e‐mails for anything malicious before they are delivered at the SMTP server. If anything is found, the e‐mails are blocked and you have prevented yourself from spreading the problem. Depending on your mail provider, your e‐mail might already be scanned for viruses on the server side. There are anti‐virus applications which are able to run as a module on (for example) a Linux mail server and make it possible to scan all the SMTP traffic passing that server. Having an anti‐virus scan on both server‐side and client‐side level provides a higher detection rate and therefor increases your protection level in e‐mail communication (Kaspersky, 2010). Think before you act Although the antivirus software will intercept the majority of these threats, there is still a very low percentage that can slip through your filter. The point is to be very cautious when you receive e‐mail. Developers of malicious codes do everything to make the e‐mail look as safe and normal as possible. When you receive a new e‐mail, there are several precaution steps you can to take to avoid malicious threats (Microsoft, 2010).   Never trust the sender information. A user is able to spoof the sender address so that the e‐ mail looks harmless.   Approach images in an e‐mail with caution. Images can contain a harmless code that sends  information back to the recipient. The process is triggered by clicking on the image and is  often used to harvest e‐mail addresses for spamming purposes.   Approach links in an e‐mail with caution. Don’t click a link if you do not trust the location it  will take you to. By moving the mouse over a link most e‐mail clients show you where the  link will take you.    9
    •  Approach attachments with caution. If you are not expecting an attachment or you don’t  know from whom it is from, do not open it. Opening an attachment can trigger a malicious  code that wasn’t picked up by your anti‐virus software.   Do not forward chain e‐mail messages. Your e‐mail address is stored in the mail and you are  not able to keep track of who gets to see the e‐mail.   Always report suspicious e‐mail when received from a trusted address. If you receive  suspicious e‐mail from an address you know, contact the recipient about the suspicious e‐ mail to avoid possible spreading of a malicious code and to warn the client about what he or  she has sent.  As stated before it is not possible to eliminate a full 100% of the threats but by letting your (up‐to‐date) anti‐virus application scan your e‐mail and by taking the above mentioned precautions, you lower your risk level to the very minimum.      10
    • Which vulnerabilities exist in email?   Besides threats in e‐mail traffic, there are several points of interest to secure your privacy when sending or accessing your e‐mail. Because the majority of the people using e‐mail rely on modern technology to secure them and their e‐mail, they do not realize the user has an equal part in this security. Without the right precautions e‐mail in general is quite unsecure. Privacy In general an e‐mail message is not encrypted, which means your content is sent in plain text to the recipient. Passing several routers that can digitally eavesdrop on the passing e‐mails there are a lot of possibilities for reading your e‐mail with the wrong intentions. Unfortunately this is not where it stops. Both ISP’s and routers can store unprotected back‐ups of your e‐mails.  “In effect, every e‐mail leaves a digital paper trail in its wake that can be easily inspected months or years later” (CPASecure, 2007). We’ve discussed the basics of packet sniffing earlier but to understand the vulnerability we will look more closely into the process and accessibility. A packet sniffer (also known as a network analyzer or network monitor) is a program that is used to intercept traffic traveling between two networked computers or servers. The packet sniffer will intercept the packets including data to store it for later analysis. When you send an e‐mail, it is broken down into segments all containing a header and footer with the destination address, sender and other information. When the packets arrive with the recipient, they are being reconstructed and the packet headers and footers are stripped away.  A simple example of a functioning packet sniffer is when you connect to a simple hub‐network with your device and set up the packet sniffer. In the network all the data is spread by a hub. Every computer receives packets that are not meant for it. A simple filter in the computer makes sure that these packets with different destination information are discarded. Usually a packet sniffer is only able to capture the packets intended for the device it is running from. But with a packet sniffer in ‘promiscuous mode’ you are able to disable the filter and receive all packets traveling through the network. Traffic from computer A to computer B can be intercepted by computer C without A & B knowing it. It’s very hard to detect this kind of packet sniffing because it creates no traffic by itself. This example is based on a hub‐network which has the principle to send all the packets to all the connected devices. A more secure network would be a switch‐network because a switch actually sends the addressed packets to the right device, unlike a hub. Unfortunately this does not mean you are protected on a switched‐network. There are a few workarounds to trick the switch in sending you the packets. One method – called ARP poisoning – will try to pretend as being the destination device so it will receive the packets. Another way is to flood the switch with different MAC‐addresses (Media Access Control) so the switch will go in ‘fail‐open mode’, this mode functions similar to the hub from the previous example. Both of the above mentioned methods do create traffic where it is easier to detect the packet sniffing (Bradley, 2010; Kayne, 2010). Besides packet sniffing it is important to know that an e‐mail user himself is a big vulnerability too. In the next chapter we will sum up some precautions an e‐mail user should take before he or she uses an e‐mail client so it becomes clear that technical abuse is not the only vulnerability. Matters like haste, improper use and unawareness can be important risks in e‐mail use.   11
    • Spam & Phishing Both spam and phishing mail are unwanted mails that try to make a profit from you. Spam mails are unwanted mails by (usually) an unknown address that try to sell you products or services. Famous spam subjects lines are:  “You received a greeting card”, “Masters degree with no efforts” and “Non‐profit job from home”. Phishing is in this case a more concealed method where people try to obtain sensitive information in a seemingly secure environment. The e‐mail or website tries to masquerade itself as trustworthy to lure the user into filling in his or her personal information. Examples are e‐mails from banks, auction sites or online payment companies. It is not hard for anyone to make a website look like it is trustworthy to fill in credit card details. It’s important to always check the website address for a correct URL (without any spelling errors) (Windows Live, 2010). Although spam seems harmless and people quickly identify it, it has still a few unknown downsides to it. When you open a spam e‐mail, eight times out of ten it contains a tracking method that enables the sender to identify your e‐mail address as active. You e‐mail address can then be sold to spam corporations in which case you will start receiving even more spam (Information Age, 2006). The biggest downside in spam e‐mail is the time‐consuming effort to remove and report spam e‐mail. It can be a tremendous cost expense for corporations. Google has launched a calculator to estimate the total loss caused by spam. For a company with 100 employers, who work 245 days a year with a salary of 65 euro an hour, spam can cost a corporation over 100.000 euro a year (Google, 2010).      12
    • How can these vulnerabilities be reduced?  Most vulnerabilities can be reduced to a minimum but can unfortunately not be eliminated. It is up to the user to determine if the risk level is low enough to use e‐mail as a communication method. In lowering this risk‐level we will take two approaches, a technical and human approach.   Encryption (SSL, TLS & PGP) In the technical approach the focus lies on encryption. Encryption is an important part of e‐mail security. In encrypting the messages are cyphered into unreadable code so the packets are not readable for anyone who tries to intercept them. All e‐mail traffic should be done through a secure connection. Not only sending and receiving e‐mails but also the commands sent to the server such as log‐in information should be secure. A secure connection can be established by either using the SSL or the TLS protocol. SSL (Secure Socket Layer) was initially created by Netscape to ensure the integrity of data transport. TLS (Transport Layer Security) is built as an improvement on SSL with stronger key encryption algorithms and the ability to work on different ports. Both TLS and SSL use the public‐private key (Asymmetric key Cryptosystem) infrastructure. In this encryption method two unique encryption keys exist, a public and private key. The public key is used to encrypt the data and the private key to decrypt. The private key remains private but the public key is sent to a recipient to encrypt its data with. This way only the owner of the private key can decrypt the message and see what data it contains (UITS, 2009; Technet, 2010). Both your e‐mail client and e‐mail provider should be able to support a SSL or TLS connection in order to use this secure method of exchanging data. Now almost every e‐mail client supports SSL and TLS, but unfortunately there are still some older e‐mail providers who do not update their servers to adapt to this method of secure data exchange. Another way to encrypt your e‐mail is with the PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) infrastructure. PGP is like SSL and TLS also based on an Asymmetric Key Infrastructure but there is a difference. SSL and TLS are more based on the transport of data between clients and servers. PGP is meant for storing data where it will encrypt the whole e‐mail and send it to a recipient that can only decrypt it when he or she also uses PGP. While SSL and TLS are securing the protocol (Such as POP IMAP and SMTP), PGP encrypts a file (the whole e‐mail message) and thereby secures the communication between two clients. Besides encryption of the e‐mails, a recipient can also identify the sender of the e‐mail through an authentication by the sender (RUN, 2010). As mentioned before, a downside is that both clients have to support PGP which has not become a big standard with e‐mail users (yet) (PGP, 2010). Spamfilters Most e‐mail providers and clients offer spamfilter options. Even some antivirus programs offer spamfilters. A spamfilter will intercept e‐mails defined as spam based on the level of privacy that has been set in the filter. Spamfilters usually work together with your contact history and a personal database to determine what e‐mails are meant for the user and which are spam. E‐mails defined as spam will be put in the spam directory and users can scan this directory for possible mistakes. If an e‐mail slips through the filter the user has an option to mark it as spam, the sender details will then be taken into account and the e‐mail will be dealt with appropriately.   13
    • Awareness Awareness in using your e‐mail account might be just as important as installing technical precautions. In corporations it is very important for the administrators to create this awareness among the employees. Important precautions for e‐mail users are listed below.   Keep the number of e‐mail accounts to a minimum. It is wise to split personal and corporate  e‐mail over different accounts but to keep the number of accounts as low as possible.  Besides a personal and corporate account it is recommended to create a separate account  for less secure traffic, a so called spam‐account. This account can be used for internet forms  and unsecure communication (IT Security, 2008).   A more secure way of communication is the telephone. If your message can be sent by a  telephone call it is wise to choose this more secure and private option.   Spam traffic is usually cumulative. This means once you start to receive a lot of spam, the  amount will slowly increase. It is therefore smart to discard accounts which are receiving an  immense amount of spam (IT Security, 2007).   When accessing your e‐mail on a public computer, never use an e‐mail client but always use  the web‐interface of your e‐mail provider. When you are done with the session, close the  browser, log‐out and delete the cache, cookies, history and passwords so there are no traces  of your session left.   Avoid using the reply‐all or BCC option in sending e‐mails. This way you show your own and  other’s e‐mail addresses to a lot of users. Try using the CC option where other e‐mail  addresses are hidden to obtain privacy (IT Security, 2008).   Never send sensitive company information with your (unsecure) personal account, always  use your corporate account where your privacy can be protected by the company’s IT  department. If the information happens to be intercepted, you are less vulnerable in possible  law conflicts (IT Security, 2007).   Create regular backups of you e‐mail account. Important e‐mail might be stored in your mail  directories, always make sure these e‐mails are backed up on your computers. Also when  accessing your e‐mail on a mobile platform and using the POP protocol, make sure there is a  copy of the e‐mail on your server. A cellphone is easily lost and with that you would lose all  your e‐mails too.   An often used technique to obtain your e‐mail address is to send you newsletters with an  unsubscribe option. When you have clicked this option you will be linked to a webpage and  your e‐mail address will be stored. Don’t unsubscribe for these e‐mails unless you remember  subscribing to them (IT Security, 2007).   Phishing mails might slip through your spamfilter depending on the level of thoroughness  you set it to. Identify a phishing mail by looking for anything that implies the mail is not from  who it pretends to be. In the mail you will probably be asked to fill in personal information.  Most banks, web payments and auction sites use web‐forms for these matters so if you are  asked to mail your account details you can assume it is fake. If they give you a link to go to,  always hold your mouse cursor on the link to see where the address may lead you to. Check  carefully for spelling errors in the link which is a common trick to masquerade as a  trustworthy identity (Microsoft, 2010).   14
    •  Realize where your e‐mail goes to and how it travels there. It is important that an e‐mail user  knows how his e‐mail works and what could happen. This might scare the user to avoid e‐ mail to a certain extinct.        15
    • Sources  (Black, 2010) – What is Email? By Ken Black. http://www.wisegeek.com/what‐is‐email.htm retrieved on 20‐4‐2010. (Hardy,  1996) ‐ The Evolution of ARPANET email, by Ian R. Hardy. http://www.livinginternet.com/References/Ian%20Hardy%20Email%20Thesis.txt retrieved on 20‐4‐2010. (Brain, 2008) – How email works? By Marshall Brain and Tim Crosby. http://communication.howstuffworks.com/email.htm retrieved on 20‐4‐2010. (Tschabitscher, 2010) – How MIME works, by Heinz Tschabitscher. http://email.about.com/cs/standards/a/mime.htm  retrieved on 20‐4‐2010. (Hitwise, 2010) – Top 20 Sites & Engines, by Hitwise Pty ltd. http://www.hitwise.com/us/datacenter/main/dashboard‐10133.html  retrieved on 21‐4‐2010. (Brownlow, 2009) – Email and Webmail statistics, by Mark Brownlow. http://www.email‐marketing‐reports.com/metrics/email‐statistics.htm  retrieved on 21‐4‐2010. (iHotdesk, 2008) – Email most popular form of communication, by iHotdesk. http://www.ihotdesk.com/article/18626486/Email‐most‐popular‐form‐of‐communication  retrieved on 21‐4‐2010. (Pingdom, 2010) – Internet 2009 in numbers by Pingdom. http://royal.pingdom.com/2010/01/22/internet‐2009‐in‐numbers/ retrieved on 21‐4‐2010. (Wilson, 1997) – The Journey of packets, by Garret Wilson. http://www.garretwilson.com/essays/computers/routing.html  retrieved on 21‐4‐2010. (Theall, 2004) – IMAP unencrypted cleartext logins, by George A. Theall. http://www.securityspace.com/smysecure/catid.html?id=15856  retrieved on 21‐4‐2010. (Symantec, 2010) – Internet Security Threat Report Volume XV: April 2009, by Symantec. http://eval.symantec.com/mktginfo/enterprise/white_papers/b‐whitepaper_exec_summary_internet_security_threat_report_xiii_04‐2008.en‐us.pdf  retrieved on 21‐4‐2010. (GFI Software, 2009) – Protecting your network against e‐mail threats, by GFI Software. http://www.gfi.com/whitepapers/network‐protection‐against‐email‐threats.pdf  retrieved on 22‐4‐2010. (Petri, 2009) – What’s a Trojan horse? By Daniel Petri. http://www.petri.co.il/whats_a_trojan_horse.htm  retrieved on 22‐04‐2010. (Notenboom, 2007) – Whats a botnet? Or Zombie? And how do myself from whatever it is? By Leo Notenboom. http://ask‐  16
    • leo.com/whats_a_botnet_or_zombie_and_how_do_i_protect_myself_from_whatever_it_is.html  retrieved on 22‐4‐2010. (Spamlaws, 2009) Computer Virus: The Types of Viruses Out There, by Spamlaws.   http://www.spamlaws.com/virus‐types.html  retrieved on 24‐4‐2010. (Kamat, 2001) Viruses – Types and Examples, by Mayur Kamat. http://www.boloji.com/computing/security/015.htm  retrieved on 24‐4‐2010. (Beal, 2009) The difference between a computer virus, worm and Trojan horse. By Vangie Beal. http://www.webopedia.com/didyouknow/internet/2004/virus.asp  retrieved on 24‐4‐2010. (Lemos, 2000) Inside the ILOVEYOU worm. By Robert Lemos. http://news.zdnet.com/2100‐9595_22‐107344.html  retrieved on 24‐4‐2010. (Mathews, 2009) Six free antivirus programs made for your Windows 7 system, by Lee Mathews. http://www.downloadsquad.com/2009/10/24/six‐free‐antivirus‐programs‐made‐for‐your‐windows‐7‐system/  retrieved on 24‐4‐2010. (Kaspersky, 2010) Kaspersky Anti‐Virus for Linux Mail server, by Kaspersky. http://www.kaspersky.com/anti‐virus_linux_mail_server  retrieved on 24‐4‐2010. (Microsoft, 2010) How to handle suspicious mail, by Microsoft. http://www.microsoft.com/protect/fraud/spam/email.aspx  retrieved on 24‐4‐2010. (CPASecure, 2007) Problems.. by CPASecure. http://www.cpasecure.com/Problems.html retrieved on 25‐4‐2010. (Bradley, 2010) Introduction to packet sniffing. By Tony Bradley. http://netsecurity.about.com/cs/hackertools/a/aa121403.htm  retrieved on 25‐4‐2010. (Kayne, 2010) What is a packet sniffer? By R. Kayne. http://www.wisegeek.com/what‐is‐a‐packet‐sniffer.htm  retrieved on 25‐4‐2010 (Windows Live, 2010) What is phishing? By Windows Live. http://onecare.live.com/site/en‐Us/article/phishing_what.htm  retrieved on 26‐4‐2010. (Information Age, 2006) The hidden danger of spam, by Information Age.  http://www.information‐age.com/articles/295441/the‐hidden‐danger‐of‐spam.thtml  retrieved on 26‐4‐2010. (Google, 2010) The Google ROI calculator, by Google. http://www.google.com/postini/roi_calculator.html retrieved on 26‐4‐2010. (RUN, 2010) E‐mail en PGP, by Radboudt University Nijmegen. http://www.ru.nl/ict‐beveiliging/cert_ru/algemene_informatie/e‐mail_en_pgp/  retrieved on 27‐4‐2010. (UITS, 2009) What is the difference between SSL and TLS, by Univesity Information Technologies Services. http://kb.iu.edu/data/anjv.html  retrieved on 27‐4‐2010. (PGP, 2010) PGP Desktop e‐mail, by PGP corporation. http://www.pgp.com/products/desktop_email/ retrieved on 27‐4‐2010.   17
    • (Technet, 2010) Technet Library – What is TLS/SSL? By Technet Microsoft Corporation. http://technet.microsoft.com/en‐us/library/cc784450(WS.10).aspx  retrieved on 27‐4‐2010. (IT Security, 2008) Hacking Email: 99 Tips to Make you More Secure and Productive, by IT Security. http://www.itsecurity.com/features/99‐email‐security‐tips‐112006/ retrieved on 27‐4‐2010 (IT Security, 2007) 25 Most common mistakes in e‐mail security, by IT security. http://www.itsecurity.com/features/25‐common‐email‐security‐mistakes‐022807/ retrieved on 27‐4‐2010.     18