Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Supporting English Learners within the Common Core State Standards

2,688

Published on

by Stacey Larson-Everson, Services Administrator for English Learners and Specialized Instruction, Orange County Department of Education

by Stacey Larson-Everson, Services Administrator for English Learners and Specialized Instruction, Orange County Department of Education

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,688
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.       Supporting  English  Learners   within  the  Common  Core   State  Standards   Stacey  Larson-­‐Everson   Administrator,  Services  for  English  Learners  &  Specialized  Instruc>on   Orange  County  Department  of  Educa>on   September  24,  2013   Sponsored  by:  
  • 2. In  this  session  we  will  explore:   •  CCSS  implica>ons  specifically  for  English  learners   •  ELD  standards  connec>ons  to  the  CCSS   •  NCLB,  Title  III  and  other  federally  mandated   requirements   •  Key  research  to  support  best  professional  prac>ces   •  Essen>al  program  elements  to  support  implementa>on   of  the  CCSS  in  tandem  with  the  ELD  standards   •  The  need  for  varied  language  supports  aligned  with   concept  development  and  language  development  so  that   students  are  supported  in  comprehension  and   produc>on  of  language  
  • 3. Session  Outcomes   Session  par+cipants  will:   •  Pinpoint  key  performance  outcomes  for  English  learners  which  are   embedded  throughout  the  CCSS  and  recognize  the  need  for  ELD  in   tandem  with  CCSS  instruc>on     •  Gain  clear  understanding  about  the  instruc>onal  products  of  both   ELD  and  SDAIE  strategies   •  Relate  current  research  to  instruc>onal  prac>ces  for  English  learners   within  the  CCSS   •  Iden>fy  essen>al  components  of  ac>on  plans  to  address  the   instruc>onal  needs  of  English  learners  
  • 4. De<inition  of  an  English  Learner   An  English  Learner:     •  Has  a  primary  language  or  “home  language”  other  than   English   •  Demonstrates  on  state  assessments  that  he  or  she  lacks   the  English  language  skills  required  in  listening   comprehension,  speaking,  reading  and  wri>ng  to  be   successful  within  a  school’s  regular  instruc>onal   programs  
  • 5. Federal  Guidance  for     English  Learners   No  Child  Le6  Behind:   “  All  limited-­‐English-­‐proficient  students  will  become  proficient  in  English   and  reach  high  academic  standards,  at  a  minimum  a;aining   proficiency  or  be;er  in  reading/language  arts  and  mathema+cs.”     Lau  vs.  Nichols,  Supreme  Court     “  There  is  no  equality  of  treatment  merely  by  providing  students  with  the   same  facili>es,  textbooks,  teachers  and  curriculum…for  students  who   do  not  understand  English  are  effec>vely  foreclosed  from  any   meaningful  educa>on..”        If  we  give  EL’s  what  we  give  everyone  else,  it  is  insufficient.        
  • 6. Dual  Obligation   Curriculum   Instruc>on   Assessment   Interven>on   Content   (SDAIE)   Language   (ELD)   “Instruc+on  in  the  key  components  of  reading  is  necessary,  but  not  sufficient  for   teaching  language  minority  students  to  read  and  write  proficiently  in  English.”   Na>onal  Literacy  Panel  
  • 7. Creating  a  Vision  for  CCSS   Instruction   •  As  leaders  we  need  to  understand  the  standards  and  support   our  teachers  in  knowing  and  deeply  understanding  the   standards   •  We  must  allocate  >me  to  learn  and  know  the  key  shi_s  in   both  ELA  and  math   •  Evaluate  which  standards  as  a  school  or  districts  we  are  less   prepared  to  successfully  implement   •  Emphasize  reading  and  math  founda>onal  skills   •  Provide  specific  curriculum     •  Iden>fy  and  expect  best  instruc>onal  prac>ces   •  Priori>ze  interven>on   •  Plan  for  daily,  separate  ELD  instruc>on  as  part  of  core  content  
  • 8. What  Will  ELs  Need  to  Do?   •  Engage  in  produc>ve  oral  and  wri`en  group  work  with  peers     •  Par>cipate  in  effec>ve  oral  and  wri`en  interac>ons  with  teachers     •  Explain  and  demonstrate  their  knowledge  using  emerging   complex  language  and  other  communica>ve  strategies  in   different  seangs     •  Extract  meaning  from  complex  wri`en  texts       Understanding  Language/Language,  Literacy  and  Learning  in  the  Content  Areas,  Stanford  University,  2012,  Kenji  Hakuta  
  • 9. Habits  of  Mind   •  Bloom’s,  DOK,  …   •  The  message  is  cri$cal  thinking!    
  • 10. CCSS  &  ELD  Standards:   Paradigm  Shift   Previous  Paradigm–  The  Sage  on  the  Stage   •  Teacher  delivers  knowledge  through  direct   instruc>on   •  Students  work  independently   •  Emphasis  is  placed  in  the  correct  answer   •  Learning  is  measured  mainly  through   mul>ple-­‐choice    standardized  assessments   Next  Genera>on  Paradigm–The  Coach   •  Teacher  facilitates  the  acquisi>on  of  knowledge   and  skills   •  Knowledge  is  socially  constructed   •  Emphasis  is  placed  on  the  process  of  learning   •  Learning  is  measured  through  collabora>ve   processes,  performances,  porfolios,  and  products   (Next  Genera>on  Assessments)    
  • 11. Within  the  CCSS,  language  demands  range  from  social   and  general  to  discipline-­‐specific  and  academic.     English  learner  students  need  to:   •  Obtain  informa>on,  request  clarifica>on   •  Demonstrate  understanding,  confirm  being   understood     •  Build  on  others’  &  ar>culate  own  ideas   •  Construct  explana>ons,  engage  in  arguments     Another  Way  to  Say  it?  
  • 12. “English  learners  do  not  reliably  develop  ease  and   accuracy  in  using  language  required  for   academic  tasks  through  passive  listening  or   unstructured  interac9ons”.   From:  Improving  Educa9on  for  ELs:  Research-­‐Based  Approaches  (CDE,  2010).  Dutro  and  Kinsella,  page  178.     Research  says……  
  • 13. What  Will  ELs  Need  to  Do?   •  Engage  in  produc>ve  oral  and  wri`en  group  work  with  peers     •  Par>cipate  in  effec>ve  oral  and  wri`en  interac>ons  with  teachers     •  Explain  and  demonstrate  their  knowledge  using  emerging   complex  language  and  other  communica>ve  strategies  in   different  seangs     •  Extract  meaning  from  complex  wri`en  texts       Understanding  Language/Language,  Literacy  and  Learning  in  the  Content  Areas,  Stanford  University,  2012,  Kenji  Hakuta  
  • 14. The  CA  ELD  Standards      Align  with  California’s  Common  Core  State  Standards  for  English   Language  Arts,  Literacy  in  History/Social  Studies,  Science,  and  Technical   Subjects.       Highlight  and  amplify  the  key  language  knowledge,  skills,  and  abili+es   in  the  CCSS  cri>cal  for  ELs  to  access,  engage  with,  and  achieve  in  grade-­‐ level  academic  content  while  they  are  learning  English.       Should  be  used  in  tandem  with  the  CCSS  and  not  in  isola+on     Key  Ideas  and   Messaging    
  • 15. Methods  of  Instruc>on   ELD  Focus   SDAIE  Focus   •  Addresses  all  aspects  of  language     •  Is  based  on  students’  various   proficiency  levels     •  Lesson  objec>ves  reflect  explicit   language  outcomes     •  Lesson  objec>ves  are  inten>onally   selected     •  Assessment–  ELPAC   •  Addresses  the  academic  language                needed    for  various  content  areas     •  Uses  scaffolding  to  provide  access   for  EL  students     •  Ac>vi>es  and  instruc>on  are   inten>onally  created  to  match  the   lesson’s  content  and  language   objec>ves     •  Assessment–  Smarter  Balanced   Consor>um  Assessments    “The main goal of English Language Development (ELD) is to ensure that students develop the levels of English proficiency required to succeed academically.” Improving Education for English Learners: Research-Based Approaches California Department of Education, 2010 “To make academic content comprehensible for English Learners, SDAIE teachers provide a context for instruction that is rich in opportunities for hands-on learning and student interaction.” A Course for Teaching English Workers Lynne T. Díaz-Rico, 2011
  • 16. Instructional  Strategies  Matter       No  ma`er  which  instruc>on  seang,  instruc>onal   strategies   ma`er   and   we   know   from   research,   some  are  be`er  than  others.  
  • 17. Schmoker:     Soundly  Structured  Lessons   •  Objec>ves  which  are  clearly  stated  and  importance  and   relevance  are  provided   •  Ac>ve  modeling  and  demonstra>ng  is  provided   •  Students  have  mul>ple  opportuni>es  to  prac>ce  under  the   guidance  of  the  teacher   •  The  teacher  checks  for  understanding  and  provides  correc>ve   feedback   •  The  teacher  makes  ac>ve  adjustments  to  the  students’   learning  needs   •  h`p://www.edweek.org/tm/ar>cles/2013/06/04/ fp_schmoker_lessons.html  
  • 18. Hattie:  Some  strategies  have  high   positive  effects  on  achievement   •  Know  which  strategies  have  a  high  effect  and  act  to  support   their  implementa>on  with  fidelity   •  Examples:   •  Direct  instruc>on   •  Reciprocal  teaching   •  Metacogni>ve  strategies   •  Repeated  Reading   •  Classroom  discussion  
  • 19. Methods  of  Instruc>on   ELD  Focus   SDAIE  Focus   •  Covers  all  aspects  of  language     •  Is  based  on  students’  various   proficiency  levels     •  Lesson  objec>ves  reflect  explicit   language  outcomes     •  Lesson  objec>ves  are  inten>onally   selected     •  Assessment–  ELPAC   •  Covers  the  academic  language                needed    for  various  content  areas     •  Uses  scaffolding  to  provide  access   for  EL  students     •  Ac>vi>es  and  instruc>on  are   inten>onally  created  to  match  the   lesson’s  content  and  language   objec>ves     •  Assessment–  Smarter  Balanced   Consor>um  Assessments    “The main goal of English Language Development (ELD) is to ensure that students develop the levels of English proficiency required to succeed academically.” Improving Education for English Learners: Research-Based Approaches California Department of Education, 2010 “To make academic content comprehensible for English Learners, SDAIE teachers provide a context for instruction that is rich in opportunities for hands-on learning and student interaction.” A Course for Teaching English Workers Lynne T. Díaz-Rico, 2011
  • 20. Honing  in  on  ELD   What  are  the  components  of  the   2012  ELD  Standards?  
  • 21. Components   Common  Core  State   Standards   Proficiency  Levels   Part  I   Part  II   Part  III   Appendices  B,C            YOU  bring  it  all             together!    (Part  III  is  Appendix  A)  
  • 22. What  Will  ELs  Need  to  Do?   •  Engage  in  produc>ve  oral  and  wri`en  group  work  with  peers     •  Par>cipate  in  effec>ve  oral  and  wri`en  interac>ons  with  teachers     •  Explain  and  demonstrate  their  knowledge  using  emerging   complex  language  and  other  communica>ve  strategies  in   different  seangs     •  Extract  meaning  from  complex  wri`en  texts       Understanding  Language/Language,  Literacy  and  Learning  in  the  Content  Areas,  Stanford  University,  2012,  Kenji  Hakuta  
  • 23. Three  Opportuni>es  of  Language  Instruc>on   Language  Instruc+on   CCSS  Language  Anchor   Standards:      Instruc>onal  focus-­‐Correct   grammar  and  usage   Academic  Language:       Instruc9onal  focus-­‐More  than   vocabulary-­‐  the  language   students  need  to  fully  express   academic  concepts   English  Language   Development:       Instruc9onal  focus-­‐   Highlight  and  amplify  the  cri9cal   language,  knowledge  about   language  and  skills  using   language  in  the  CCSS  for  English   learners  to  be  successful  in   school   ELA,  ELD     Content  areas,  ELD   ELD  
  • 24. Points  to  Consider   What  tasks  do  I  want  my  students  to  be  able  to  complete   independently?   1.  Determine  the  central  ideas  from  various  texts  and   summarize  accurately  (7th  Grade  History  Literacy  2.0)   2.  Explain  ideas  based  on  close  readings  of  grade-­‐level   texts  (7th  Grade  ELD–  Wri+ng  6-­‐A)     What  do  I  need  to  consider  to  get  them  to  that  point?   1.  The  academic  language  they  need  to  be  successful   2.  Their  language  needs  according  to  their  PLD   (emerging,  expanding,  bridging)   3.  How  to  make  our  +me  together  relevant,  challenging,   and  engaging   What  tools  do  I  have  to  put  all  of  this  together  for  my   students?   1.  Scaffolding   2.  Differen+a+on   3.  Integrated  instruc+on   Ah-­‐ha!  If  I  integrate  the  academic  content  and  ELD   standards,  my  students  will  develop  both  the  academic   and  English  fluency.  I  am  the  best  teacher  ever!  
  • 25. Optimizing  ELD   •  Dedicate  separate  >me,  daily  for  ELD  instruc>on          (Thomas  and  Collier  (2002),  Tong  et  al.  2008,            Genesee  et  al.  2006,  Keck  et  al.  2006…….)   •  Clearly  and  loudly  iden>fy  ELD  as  an  instruc>onal  priority   •  ELD  should  aim  to  move  students  forward  in  their  level          of  language  proficiency     •   ELD  instruc>on    should  include  interac>ve  ac>vi>es  which  are   well  planned  and  correc>ve  feedback   •  ELD  should  address  language:  forms,  func>ons,  fluency,   academic  language    
  • 26. Geang  from  Point  A  to  Point  B   How  will  English  learners  get  the  robust  instruc$on  they  need?     •  Inten>onal  scheduling  to  accommodate  development  of  both  academic  and   language  proficiency   •  Explicit  instruc+on  focus  on  both  content  and  language  development   •  Teacher  planning  >me  set  aside  to  collaborate,  integrate  and  differen>ate   •  Teacher  >me  to  access  professional  development,  materials,  and  resources   aimed  at  CCSS  and  ELD  “in  tandem”   •  Purposeful    and  calculated  expenditure  of  funds  to  support  these  specific   ac>vi>es  aimed  at  English  learner  achievement    
  • 27. Priorities  and  $$$$   How  do  we  move  these  from  agenda  items  to  ac+on?     -­‐Make  strong  connec>ons  between  state  and  federal  academic   performance  outcomes  and  local  priori>es     -­‐Connect  dollars,  with  specific  ac>vi>es  and  outcomes     -­‐Analyze  local  strengths  and  weakness  in  curriculum,  PD,  and                       assessment  
  • 28. Select  PD….   •  To  build  capacity  and  foster  collec>ve  responsibility  for  each   and  every  student     •  Which  is  selec>ve  to  your  needs  and  iden>fied  key  ini>a>ves   •  Which  is  job  embedded,  on-­‐going  and  frequent     •  Includes  lesson  study  and  is  focused  on  instruc>on     •  Connects  with  standards,  materials,  research  and  data   analysis  
  • 29. Resources   LCAP:     h`p://www.ocde.us/LegalServices/Documents/Local%20Control %20Accountability%20Plans%20-­‐%20FINAL.pdf     Understanding  Language/Stanford  Papers:   h`p://ell.stanford.edu/     Improving  Educa>on  for  English  Learners:  Research-­‐Based  Approaches   h`p://www.cal.org/resources/pubs/improving-­‐educa>on-­‐for-­‐english-­‐ learners.html     Unlocking  the  Research  on  English  Learners   h`ps://www.a_.org/newspubs/periodicals/ae/summer2013/ index.cfm        
  • 30. Q  &  A   To  ask  a  ques>on,  hover  your  mouse  over  the  green  bar  at  the  top   of  your  screen  and  click  “Chat”.  Chat  your  ques>on  to  the  Host.  
  • 31. Thank  you!   Stacey  Larson-­‐Everson   Orange  County  Department  of  Educa>on   Slarson-­‐Everson@ocde.us   714-­‐966-­‐4338   Sponsored  by:  

×