Introduction to population pyramids

3,714 views
3,367 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, News & Politics
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,714
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
472
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Introduction to population pyramids

  1. 1. Population Pyramids • An age-sex graph, is commonly referred to as a population pyramid - even though the graph for some countries is not actually a pyramid shape Displays: a population's age and sex composition
  2. 2. Why we use Pop Pyramids • Population pyramids reveal a great deal about a population at a glance. • Populations of countries can differ markedly as a result of past and current patterns of fertility, mortality, and migration
  3. 3. Age-Sex Graphs with Five-Year Cohort
  4. 4. Pyramid Components • Horizontal bars represent the numbers or proportions of males and females in each age group, or cohort. • The sum of all the age-sex cohorts in the population pyramid equals 100 percent of the population. • Cohorts may vary from single years to groups of years.
  5. 5. Pyramid Components, cont. • The left side of the pyramid represents the male population and the right side, the female population. • The bars at the bottom of the pyramid represent the percent of the population EX: male 0-4 years old (left) and the percent of the population that is female, 0-4 years old (right). • Each bar above the base represents the next five-year cohort, male and female, in the population.
  6. 6. Pyramid Characteristics • As cohorts age, they inevitably lose members because of death and they may gain or lose members because of migration. • After age 45 the loss of population accelerates, causing the narrowing peak of all population pyramids.
  7. 7. 3 General Profiles • 1. Rapid growth is indicated by a pyramid with a large percentage of people in the younger ages. • 2. Slow growth is reflected by a pyramid with a smaller proportion of the population in the younger ages. • 3. Zero growth or decreasing populations are shown by roughly equal numbers of people in all age ranges, tapering off gradually at the older ages

×