Diseases of the skin

10,898 views
10,655 views

Published on

0 Comments
31 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
10,898
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
20
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1,023
Comments
0
Likes
31
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Normal histology review.
  • Basic microscopic and macroscopic descriptive terms, the essentials of describing skin lesions properly
  • Classifications and major examples of the classifications.
  • Classifications and major examples of the classifications.
  • Histology review (no labels)‏
  • Histology review (labels)‏
  • Voila!
  • Appendages: hair follicles, sebaceous glands, sweat glands (eccrine, apocrine). Is this thick skin or thin skin?
  • Intradermal nevus
  • Intradermal nevus
  • Junctional nevus
  • Junctional nevus. Why is this called “Junctional”?
  • Malignant melanomas are malignant proliferations of melanocytes.
  • Squamous “horn cysts” in seborrheic keratosis
  • Acanthosis nigricans, often associated with diabetes mellitus
  • Acanthosis nigricans, often associated with diabetes mellitus
  • Fibroepithelial polyp, or “skin tag”
  • Fibroepithelial polyp, or “skin tag”
  • Epidermal inclusion cyst, the overlying skin looks normal.
  • Epidermal inclusion cyst
  • Keratoacanthoma, the MAIN lesion to differentiate from squamous cell carcinoma
  • Keratoacanthoma, the MAIN lesion to differentiate from squamous cell carcinoma
  • Keratoacanthoma, the MAIN lesion to differentiate from squamous cell carcinoma
  • Actinic keratosis
  • Actinic keratosis vs. squamous cell carcinoma
  • Squamous cell carcinoma, infiltrating. What is squamous cell carcinoma-in-situ usually called? Ans: Bowen’s disease
  • Squamous cell carcinoma, infiltrating. Note the “pearls”. Does the presence of pearls make this well differentiated? Ans: Yes.
  • Squamous dysplasia, perhaps actinic keratosis, or something leading into squamous cell carcinoma.
  • By far , the commonest malignancy of skin, BCC, i.e., Basal Cell Carcinoma, typical appearance.
  • By far, the commonest malignancy of skin, BCC, i.e., Basal Cell Carcinoma, typical appearance. Note the PERIPHERAL PALISADING!!!
  • Merkel cell tumor, very highly malignant and usually fatal, looks EXACTLY like a small cell carcinoma of the lung? Ans: yes.
  • Benign fibrous histiocytoma, or dermatofibroma
  • Benign fibrous histiocytoma, or dermatofibroma
  • Large fibrous histiocytoma, perhaps a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans?
  • Malignant fibrous histiocytoma .
  • Xanthomas filled with cholesterol and lipids, to give the “foamy” appearance.
  • Xanthoma filled with cholesterol and lipids, to give the “foamy” appearance.
  • Hemangioma, often a congenital “birth mark”, which can regress significantly with aging .
  • Kaposi’s sarcoma
  • Icthyosis, usually genetic.
  • Inflammatory skin diseases are called dermatoses.
  • Eczema
  • Eczema with spongiosis
  • Pustules can be thought of as extreme “ spongiosis”
  • Pustules, ulcerated
  • Classical psoriasis, parakeratosis, hyperplasia, rete peg elongation, chronic inflammation, microabscesses (of Munro)‏
  • Know the various types of “bullous” diseases. What is a bulla? What is acantholysis?
  • Pemphigus, ruptured, scabbed bullae
  • Pemphigus, fresh bullae
  • AcantPemphigus, fresh bullae holysis in the bullous family of diseases
  • Papillomatous epidermal hyperplasia is the most consistent feature of verrucae (warts)‏
  • Molluscum contagiosum.
  • Impetigo
  • Ringworm of scalp
  • Tinea barbae
  • Ringworm
  • Tinea cruris, or jock itch
  • Athlete’s foot, or tinea pedis
  • Onychomycosis
  • PAS stain of hyphae
  • PAS stain of hyphae
  • Scabies in it’s most common location
  • Diseases of the skin

    1. 1. SKIN www.freelivedoctor.com
    2. 2. Skin Skin, epidermis Skin, epidermis, keratinocytes, stratum basale (germinativum) Skin, epidermis, keratinocytes, stratum spinosum (prickle cells)‏ Skin, epidermis, keratinocytes, stratum granulosum Skin, epidermis, keratinocytes, stratum lucidum Skin, epidermis, keratinocytes, stratum corneum, thin skin Skin, epidermis, keratinocytes, stratum corneum, thick skin Skin, epidermis, melanocytes Skin, epidermis, Langerhans cells Skin, epidermis, Merkel cells Skin, epidermis, appendage(s)‏ Skin, epidermis, appendage, hair follicle Skin, epidermis, appendage, hair follicle, shaft Skin, epidermis, appendage, hair follicle, sebaceous gland Skin, epidermis, appendage, sweat gland, eccrine Skin, epidermis, appendage, sweat gland, apocrine Skin, basement membrane Skin, dermis Skin, dermis, papillary Skin, dermis, reticular Skin, hypodermis (sub-cutis, pannus)‏ N O R M A L www.freelivedoctor.com
    3. 3. Macroscopic Macroscopic, macule Macroscopic, patch Macroscopic, papule Macroscopic, nodule Macroscopic, plaque Macroscopic, vesicle Macroscopic, bulla Macroscopic, blister Macroscopic, pustule Macroscopic, wheal Macroscopic, scale Macroscopic, lichenification Macroscopic, excoriation Macroscopic, onycholysis microscopic microscopic, hyperkeratosis microscopic, parakeratosis microscopic, hypergranulosis microscopic, acanthosis microscopic, papillomatosis microscopic, acantholysis microscopic, spongiosis microscopic, hydropic swelling (ballooning)‏ microscopic, exocytosis microscopic, erosion microscopic, ulceration microscopic, vacuolization microscopic, lentiginous A B N O R M A L www.freelivedoctor.com
    4. 4. Pigmentation disorders Pigmentation disorders, vitiligo Pigmentation disorders, freckle (ephelis)‏ Pigmentation disorders, melasma Pigmentation disorders, lentigo Pigmentation disorders, nevus Pigmentation disorders, nevus, melanocytic Pigmentation disorders, nevus, dysplastic Pigmentation disorders, malignant melanoma Epidermal neoplasms Epidermal neoplasms, benign Epidermal neoplasms, benign, seborrheic keratosis Epidermal neoplasms, benign, acanthosis nigricans Epidermal neoplasms, benign, fibroepithelial polyp (skin tag)‏ Epidermal neoplasms, benign, epithelial inclusion cyst (wen)‏ Epidermal neoplasms, benign, appendage tumors Epidermal neoplasms, benign, keratoacanthoma Epidermal neoplasms, malignant, actinic keratosis Epidermal neoplasms, malignant, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)‏ Epidermal neoplasms, malignant, basal cell carcinoma (BCC)‏ Epidermal neoplasms, malignant, Merkel cell tumor Dermal neoplasms Dermal neoplasms, fibrous histiocytoma (dermatofibroma)‏ Dermal neoplasms, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans Dermal neoplasms, xanthomas Dermal neoplasms, vascular tumors Tumors of cellular “immigrants”, Langerhans cells Tumors of cellular “immigrants”, t- cell lymphomas (Mycosis Fungoides)‏ Tumors of cellular “immigrants”, mast cells A B N O R M A L www.freelivedoctor.com
    5. 5. Epidermis, maturation disorder, ichthyosis Epidermis/Dermis, inflammation, acute Epidermis/Dermis, inflammation, acute, urticaria Epidermis/Dermis, inflammation, acute, eczema Epidermis/Dermis, inflammation, acute, erythema multiforme Epidermis/Dermis, inflammation, chronic Epidermis/Dermis, inflammation, chronic, psoriasis Epidermis/Dermis, inflammation, chronic, seborrheic dermatitis Epidermis/Dermis, inflammation, chronic, lichen planus Epidermis/Dermis, inflammation, chronic, lupus erythematosus Epidermis/Dermis, infection/infestation Epidermis/Dermis, infection/infestation, (verrucae)‏ Epidermis/Dermis, infection/infestation, molluscum contagiosum Epidermis/Dermis, infection/infestation, impetigo Epidermis/Dermis, infection/infestation, fungus Epidermis/Dermis, infection/infestation, arthropods Epidermis/Dermis, infection/infestation, arthropods, bites Epidermis/Dermis, infection/infestation, arthropods, stings Epidermis/Dermis, infection/infestation, arthropods, infestations Epidermis/Dermis, bullae (blisters)‏ Epidermis/Dermis, bullae, pemphigus Epidermis/Dermis, bullae, bullous pemphigoid Epidermis/Dermis, bullae, dermatitis herpetiformis Epidermis/Dermis, bullae, epidermolysis bullosa Epidermis/Dermis, bullae, porphyria Epidermis/Dermis, adnexae (appendages), acne vulgaris Hypodermis (pannus), inflammation (panniculitis)‏ Hypodermis (pannus), inflammation, erythema nodosum Hypodermis (pannus), inflammation, erythema induratum A B N O R M A L www.freelivedoctor.com
    6. 6. NORMAL SKIN www.freelivedoctor.com
    7. 7. NORMAL SKIN, with labels www.freelivedoctor.com
    8. 8. www.freelivedoctor.com
    9. 9. www.freelivedoctor.com
    10. 10. MACRO-scopic (clinical) TERMS <ul><li>macule </li></ul><ul><li>patch </li></ul><ul><li>papule </li></ul><ul><li>nodule </li></ul><ul><li>plaque </li></ul><ul><li>vesicle </li></ul><ul><li>bulla </li></ul><ul><li>blister </li></ul><ul><li>pustule </li></ul><ul><li>wheal </li></ul><ul><li>scale </li></ul><ul><li>lichenification </li></ul><ul><li>excoriation </li></ul><ul><li>onycholysis </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    11. 11. MACROSCOPIC TERMS Macule: Circumscribed lesion of up to 5 mm in diameter characterized by flatness and usually discolored (often red)‏ Patch : Circumscribed lesion of more than 5 mm in diameter characterized by flatness and usually discolored (often red) Papule: Elevated dome-shaped or flat-topped lesion 5 mm or less across. Nodule: Elevated lesion with spherical contour greater than 5 mm across. Plaque: Elevated flat-topped lesion, usually greater than 5 mm across (may be caused by coalescent papules). Vesicle: Fluid-filled raised lesion 5 mm or less across. Bulla: Fluid-filled raised lesion greater than 5 mm across. Blister: Common term used for vesicle or bulla. Pustule: Discrete, pus-filled, raised lesion. Wheal: Itchy, transient, elevated lesion with variable blanching and erythema formed as the result of dermal edema. Scale: Dry, horny, platelike excrescence; usually the result of imperfect cornification (i.e., keratinization). Lichenification: Thickened and rough skin characterized by prominent skin markings; usually the result of repeated rubbing in susceptible persons. Excoriation: Traumatic lesion characterized by breakage of the epidermis, causing a raw linear area (i.e., a deep scratch)‏ Onycholysis: Separation of nail plate from nail bed. www.freelivedoctor.com
    12. 12. micro-scopic (histologic) TERMS <ul><li>hyperkeratosis </li></ul><ul><li>parakeratosis </li></ul><ul><li>hypergranulosis </li></ul><ul><li>acanthosis </li></ul><ul><li>papillomatosis </li></ul><ul><li>acantholysis </li></ul><ul><li>spongiosis </li></ul><ul><li>hydropic swelling (ballooning)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>exocytosis </li></ul><ul><li>erosion </li></ul><ul><li>ulceration </li></ul><ul><li>vacuolization </li></ul><ul><li>lentiginous </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    13. 13. MICROSCOPIC TERMS Hyperkeratosis: Thickening of the stratum corneum, often associated with a qualitative abnormality of the keratin. Parakeratosis: Modes of keratinization characterized by the retention of the nuclei in the stratum corneum. On mucous membranes, parakeratosis is normal. Hypergranulosis: Hyperplasia of the stratum granulosum, often due to intense rubbing. Acanthosis: Diffuse epidermal hyperplasia. Papillomatosis: Surface elevation caused by hyperplasia and enlargement of contiguous dermal papillae. Dyskeratosis: Abnormal keratinization occurring prematurely within individual cells or groups of cells below the stratum granulosum. Generally the same as DYSPLASIA. Acantholysis: Loss of intercellular connections resulting in loss of cohesion between keratinocytes. Spongiosis: Intercellular edema of the epidermis. Hydropic swelling (ballooning): Intracellular edema of keratinocytes. Exocytosis: Infiltration of the epidermis by inflammatory or circulating blood cells. Erosion: Discontinuity of the skin exhibiting incomplete loss of the epidermis. Ulceration: Discontinuity of the skin exhibiting complete loss of the epidermis and often of portions of the dermis and even subcutaneous fat. Vacuolization: Formation of vacuoles within or adjacent to cells; often refers to basal cell-basement membrane zone area. Lentiginous: Referring to a linear pattern of melanocyte proliferation within the epidermal basal cell layer. Lentiginous melanocytic hyperplasia can occur as a reactive change or as part of a neoplasm of melanocytes. www.freelivedoctor.com
    14. 14. SKIN PATHOLOGY <ul><li>DEGENERATION </li></ul><ul><li>INFLAMMATION, i.e., DERMATOSES </li></ul><ul><li>NEOPLASMS: Epidermis, Dermis, Benign, Malignant </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    15. 15. SKIN PATHOLOGY <ul><li>Pigmentation </li></ul><ul><li>Epidermal tumors, benign </li></ul><ul><li>Epidermal tumors premalignant </li></ul><ul><li>Epidermal tumors, malignant </li></ul><ul><li>Dermal tumors </li></ul><ul><li>“ Immigrant” tumors </li></ul><ul><li>Maturation disorders </li></ul><ul><li>Dermatoses, acute </li></ul><ul><li>Dermatoses, chronic </li></ul><ul><li>Blisters (Bullae)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>Appendage (adnexal) disorders </li></ul><ul><li>Panniculitis </li></ul><ul><li>Infection/Infestation </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    16. 16. PIGMENTATION DISORDERS <ul><li>VITILIGO </li></ul><ul><li>FRECKLE (EPHELIS)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>MELASMA </li></ul><ul><li>LENTIGO </li></ul><ul><li>NEVUS </li></ul><ul><li>“ DYSPLASTIC” NEVUS </li></ul><ul><li>MALIGNANT MELANOMA </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    17. 17. NEVI <ul><li>Many, many adjectives and classifications. </li></ul><ul><li>The MAIN things to differentiate from melanomas </li></ul><ul><li>Junctional (more pigmented, more closely associated with melanoma)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>Intradermal </li></ul><ul><li>Compound (both)‏ </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    18. 18. www.freelivedoctor.com Intradermal nevus
    19. 19. www.freelivedoctor.com Intradermal nevus
    20. 20. www.freelivedoctor.com Junctional nevus
    21. 21. www.freelivedoctor.com Junctional nevus.
    22. 22. MALIGNANT MELANOMA <ul><li>Incidence rising, VERY much </li></ul><ul><li>Related to SUN like ALL skin cancers are </li></ul><ul><li>The only primary skin cancer that can kill you (except for the RARE Merkel cell tumor)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>QUICKLY METASTASIZES </li></ul><ul><li>Has both VERTICAL and HORIZONTAL growth phase but prognosis is 100% related to the VERTICAL, (BRESLOW staging, TNM too)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>DIFFICULT to differentiate from NEVUS clinically and often microscopically </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    23. 23. BENIGN Epidermal Tumors <ul><li>Seborrheic Keratosis </li></ul><ul><li>Acanthosis Nigricans </li></ul><ul><li>Fibroepithelial Polyp (skin tag)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>Epidermal (inclusion) Cyst </li></ul><ul><li>Adnexal tumors : Eccrine, Apocrine </li></ul><ul><li>Keratoacanthoma </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    24. 24. www.freelivedoctor.com Squamous “horn cysts” in seborrheic keratosis
    25. 25. www.freelivedoctor.com Acanthosis nigricans, often associated with diabetes mellitus
    26. 26. www.freelivedoctor.com Acanthosis nigricans, often associated with diabetes mellitus
    27. 27. www.freelivedoctor.com Fibroepithelial polyp, or “skin tag”
    28. 28. www.freelivedoctor.com Fibroepithelial polyp, or “skin tag”
    29. 29. www.freelivedoctor.com Epidermal inclusion cyst, the overlying skin looks normal.
    30. 30. www.freelivedoctor.com Epidermal inclusion cyst
    31. 31. ADNEXAL TUMORS <ul><li>HAIR FOLLICLES </li></ul><ul><li>SEBACEOUS GLANDS </li></ul><ul><li>SWEAT GLANDS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ECCRINE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>APOCRINE </li></ul></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    32. 32. www.freelivedoctor.com Keratoacanthoma, the MAIN lesion to differentiate from squamous cell carcinoma
    33. 33. www.freelivedoctor.com Keratoacanthoma, the MAIN lesion to differentiate from squamous cell carcinoma
    34. 34. www.freelivedoctor.com Keratoacanthoma, the MAIN lesion to differentiate from squamous cell carcinoma
    35. 35. PREMALIGNANT/MALIGNANT <ul><li>ACTINIC (Solar) KERATOSIS, i.e. precursor to SCC </li></ul><ul><li>SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA, squamous “pearls”, intercellular bridges </li></ul><ul><li>BASAL CELL CARCINOMA, by far, MOST COMMON, BLUE palisading nests </li></ul><ul><li>MERKEL CELL CARCINOMA (TUMOR), VERY MALIGNANT AND LETHAL, LOOK LIKE SMALL CELL CA. OF LUNG </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    36. 36. GENERAL COMMENTS <ul><li>BOTH SCC and BCC related to SUN (i.e., radiation) exposure. </li></ul><ul><li>SCC also related to As, carcinogens, chaw, betel nut, HPV, familial, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>BOTH SCC and BCC can do local damage but very rarely metastasize or kill. </li></ul><ul><li>MERKEL CELL tumors metastasize early and extensively, like melanomas. </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    37. 37. www.freelivedoctor.com Actinic keratosis
    38. 38. www.freelivedoctor.com Actinic keratosis vs. squamous cell carcinoma
    39. 39. www.freelivedoctor.com Squamous cell carcinoma, infiltrating..... Bowen’s disease
    40. 40. www.freelivedoctor.com Squamous cell carcinoma, infiltrating. Note the “pearls”.
    41. 41. www.freelivedoctor.com Squamous dysplasia, perhaps actinic keratosis, or something leading into squamous cell carcinoma.
    42. 42. www.freelivedoctor.com The commonest malignancy of skin, BCC, i.e., Basal Cell Carcinoma, typical appearance.
    43. 43. www.freelivedoctor.com The commonest malignancy of skin, BCC, i.e., Basal Cell Carcinoma, typical appearance. Note the PERIPHERAL PALISADING!!!
    44. 44. www.freelivedoctor.com Merkel cell tumor, very highly malignant and usually fatal, looks EXACTLY like a small cell carcinoma of the lung.
    45. 45. DERMIS TUMORS <ul><li>DERMATOFIBROMA (BENIGN FIBROUS HISTIOCYTOMA)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>DERMATOFIBROSARCOMA PROTUBERANS (DFP)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>MALIGNANT FIBROUS HISTIOCYTOMA (MFH)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>XANTHOMA </li></ul><ul><li>VASCULAR TUMORS of various types </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    46. 46. www.freelivedoctor.com Benign fibrous histiocytoma, or dermatofibroma
    47. 47. www.freelivedoctor.com Benign fibrous histiocytoma, or dermatofibroma
    48. 48. www.freelivedoctor.com Large fibrous histiocytoma, perhaps a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans?
    49. 49. www.freelivedoctor.com Malignant fibrous histiocytoma
    50. 50. www.freelivedoctor.com Xanthomas filled with cholesterol and lipids, to give the “foamy” appearance.
    51. 51. www.freelivedoctor.com Xanthoma filled with cholesterol and lipids, to give the “foamy” appearance.
    52. 52. www.freelivedoctor.com Hemangioma, often a congenital “birth mark”, which can regress significantly with aging .
    53. 53. www.freelivedoctor.com Kaposi’s sarcoma
    54. 54. Cellular “Immigrants” <ul><li>Langerhans cells (Histiocytosis)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>Mycosis Fungoides (T-Cell cutaneous lymphoma)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>Mastocytosis (mast cell tumors)‏ </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    55. 55. www.freelivedoctor.com Icthyosis, usually genetic.
    56. 56. DERMATOSES <ul><li>ACUTE </li></ul><ul><ul><li>URTICARIA (i.e., “HIVES”)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ECZEMA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ERYTHEMA MULTIFORME </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CHRONIC </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PSORIASIS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>LICHEN PLANUS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>LUPUS ERTHYMATOSUS </li></ul></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    57. 57. URTICARIA <ul><li>DERMAL EDEMA </li></ul><ul><li>DILATATION of VASCULAR SPACES </li></ul><ul><li>EARLY PERIVASCULAR CUFFING OF INFLAMMATORY CELLS </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    58. 58. www.freelivedoctor.com
    59. 59. ECZEMA (aka, acute eczematous dermatitis )‏ <ul><li>A myriad of ACUTE inflammatory disorders, with allergic, drug related, sun related etiologies </li></ul><ul><li>The common histologic feature is SPONGIOSIS </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    60. 60. www.freelivedoctor.com Eczema
    61. 61. www.freelivedoctor.com Eczema with spongiosis
    62. 62. www.freelivedoctor.com spongiosis
    63. 63. www.freelivedoctor.com Pustules, ulcerated
    64. 64. PSORIASIS <ul><li>1-2% of USA </li></ul><ul><li>Elbows, Knees </li></ul><ul><li>Parakeratosis, generalized epidermal hyperplasia, elongation of the rete pegs, extensive chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates, “MUNRO” intraepidermal microabscesses </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    65. 65. www.freelivedoctor.com Classical psoriasis, parakeratosis, hyperplasia, rete peg elongation, chronic inflammation, microabscesses (of Munro)‏
    66. 66. SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS IN HIV LICHENPLANUS LUPUS www.freelivedoctor.com
    67. 67. STASIS DERMATITIS www.freelivedoctor.com
    68. 68. STASIS DERMATITIS www.freelivedoctor.com
    69. 69. STASIS DERMATITIS www.freelivedoctor.com
    70. 70. STASIS DERMATITIS www.freelivedoctor.com
    71. 71. STASIS DERMATITIS www.freelivedoctor.com
    72. 72. BULLOUS DISEASES <ul><li>PEMPHIGUS(VULGARIS)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>BULLOUS PEMPHIGOID </li></ul><ul><li>DERMATITIS HERPETIFORMIS </li></ul><ul><li>EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA </li></ul><ul><li>PORPHYRIA </li></ul><ul><li>“ ACANTHOLYSIS” is the common unifying finding, as is basement membrane immunoglobulins </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    73. 73. www.freelivedoctor.com Pemphigus, ruptured, scabbed bullae
    74. 74. www.freelivedoctor.com Pemphigus, fresh bullae
    75. 75. www.freelivedoctor.com AcantPemphigus, fresh bullae holysis in the bullous family of diseases
    76. 76. ACNE VULGARIS <ul><li>Bread and Butter of dermatology practice </li></ul><ul><li>Sebaceous duct blockage with secondary inflammation is main feature </li></ul><ul><li>bacterial lipases of Propionibacterium acnes break down sebaceous oils, and the resulting fatty acids acts as irritants </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    77. 77. www.freelivedoctor.com
    78. 78. PANNICULITIS <ul><ul><li>.ERYTHEMA NODOSUM, (red nodules on legs)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>.ERYTHEMA INDURATUM </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    79. 79. www.freelivedoctor.com
    80. 80. INFECTION/INFESTATION <ul><li>VERRUCAE, viral (HPV)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>MULLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM, viral </li></ul><ul><li>IMPETIGO, bacterial, staph  strep </li></ul><ul><li>FUNGI </li></ul><ul><li>ARTHROPODS </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    81. 81. www.freelivedoctor.com
    82. 82. www.freelivedoctor.com Papillomatous epidermal hyperplasia is the most consistent feature of verrucae (warts)‏
    83. 83. www.freelivedoctor.com Molluscum contagiosum.
    84. 84. www.freelivedoctor.com Impetigo
    85. 85. TINEAS… <ul><li>… Capitis (Scalp ringworm)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>… Barbae </li></ul><ul><li>… Corporis (Ringworm)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>… Cruris (Jock itch)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>… Pedis (Athlete’s foot)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>… Onychomycosis (nail)‏ </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    86. 86. TINEAS <ul><li>Trichophyton species </li></ul><ul><li>Microsporum species </li></ul><ul><li>Epidermophyton species </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    87. 87. www.freelivedoctor.com Ringworm of scalp
    88. 88. www.freelivedoctor.com Tinea barbae
    89. 89. www.freelivedoctor.com Ringworm
    90. 90. www.freelivedoctor.com Tinea cruris, or jock itch
    91. 91. www.freelivedoctor.com Athlete’s foot, or tinea pedis
    92. 92. www.freelivedoctor.com Onychomycosis
    93. 93. www.freelivedoctor.com PAS stain of hyphae
    94. 94. www.freelivedoctor.com PAS stain of hyphae
    95. 95. ARTHROPODS <ul><li>Bites </li></ul><ul><li>Stings </li></ul><ul><li>INFESTATIONS </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    96. 96. ARTHROPODS <ul><li>Pediculosis </li></ul><ul><li>Demodex </li></ul><ul><li>Ticks, Mites </li></ul><ul><li>Scabies </li></ul>www.freelivedoctor.com
    97. 97. www.freelivedoctor.com Scabies in it’s most common location

    ×