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"This is Sparta!" Greco-Persian War or the Battle of Thermopylae
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"This is Sparta!" Greco-Persian War or the Battle of Thermopylae

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Want to see the prowess of a 13-year old? ...

Want to see the prowess of a 13-year old?

My 8th grader, Amith, put together this presentation (He did 90% of the work) for the GATE student-to-student conference held at UCSC on Saturday, May 21, 2011.

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  • In 300, a Persian messenger comes to the Spartans right before battle. The messenger demands that Sparta surrenders. King Leonidas and his guards yell, “This Is Sparta!” and kick the messenger into the “Pit of Death”.
  • A Persian emissary demanded that Leonidas lay down his weapons; Leonidas made a now-famous response: “Come and get them”.
  • Ancient Greece was divided into city-states. Some city-states were Sparta, Athens, and Thebes.
  • Sparta was a prominent Greek city-state. 500BC.Sparta was dominant in military power.
  • Emissaries were sent by the Persian Empire to all the Greek city-states and asked for a gift of “food and water”.The Spartans threw the messengers into a well and a pit and told the messengers to obtain their “earth and water” from there.This started the Greco-Persian wars.Lasted 20 years – from 499 to 479 BC.
  • 490 BCDarius I was king of the Persian EmpireDarius’ army invaded Greece through the Plain of MarathonSparta did not participateAthenians defeated Darius’ army in the Battle of Marathon.
  • Darius died in 486 BC, and his son Xerxes took the throne.Xerxes started a full scale invasion of Greece.The Greek city-states formed an alliance.Command of the army was given to Sparta.Command of the navy was given to Athens.The Athenian politician Themistocles suggested that Greek forces block Xerxes’ army at Thermopylae.
  • Thermopylae is a narrow pass.The Greeks would easily be able to block it.The major weak point for the Greeks was a mountain track that could allow the Persians to outflank the Greeks. Troops were positioned there to block the route.
  • The Greek army was led by the Spartan King Leonidas. There were about 7,000 Greeks blocking the pass.
  • The number of troops in Xerxes’ army is disputed, but modern scholars estimate in the range 70,000 to 300,000.
  • Xerxes attacked the Greeks.The Greeks fought at the narrowest part of the pass.Many of Xerxes’ men were killed, and the Persian army was unable to make headway against the Greeks.
  • Xerxes attacked the Greeks once more. He fared no better than he had on the first.A Greek traitor named Ephialtes told Xerxes about the mountain track around Thermopylae and offered to guide Xerxes’ army.
  • Leonidas learned from a runner that the path had not been held, so he called a war council.Most of the army retreated, and only about 3,000 men remained.The remaining soldiers either surrendered or were killed.The Persians go through the pass, but had up to 20,000 fatalities.
  • Later, the Greeks won a victory at the Battle of Plataea, and destroyed much of the Persian army. The Greeks also defeated the Persian fleet at the Battle of Mycale.This ended the invasion of Greece.
  • The Battle of Thermopylae is famous because of the heroism of the forces that remained to fight when they knew they were doomed.

"This is Sparta!" Greco-Persian War or the Battle of Thermopylae "This is Sparta!" Greco-Persian War or the Battle of Thermopylae Presentation Transcript

  • This Is Sparta!The Battle of Thermopylae
    By Amith Lukkoor
    7th Grade, Rolling Hills Middle School, Los Gatos
    GATE Student-to-Student Conference
    Saturday May 21, 2011 UCSC
  • The Origins of the Phrase“This is Sparta!”
    The Movie
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QkWS9PiXekE
    In 300, a Persian messenger comes to the Spartans right before battle.
    The messenger demands that Sparta surrenders.
    King Leonidas and his guards yell, “This Is Sparta!” and kick the messenger into the “Pit of Death.”
  • What Happened For Real?
    A Persian emissary demanded that Leonidas lay down his weapons; Leonidas made a now-famous response: “Come and get them”.
  • Ancient Greece was divided into city-states.
    Some city-states were Sparta, Athens, and Thebes.
    Greece
    Greece
  • Sparta
    Sparta was a prominent Greek city-state.
    500 B.C.
    Sparta was dominant in military power.
  • INDIA
    Persian Empire
  • Greco-Persian Wars
    Emissaries were sent by the Persian Empire to all the Greek city-states and asked for a gift of “food and water.”
    The Spartans threw the messengers into a well and a pit and told the messengers to obtain their “earth and water” from there.
    This started the Greco-Persian wars.
    Lasted 20 years – from 499 to 479 BC.
  • KING DARIUS I
    The First Persian Invasion of Greece
    490 BC
    Darius I was king of the Persian Empire
  • The First Persian Invasion of Greece
    Darius’ army invaded Greece through the Plain of Marathon
    Sparta did not participate
  • The First Persian Invasion of Greece
    Athenians defeated Darius’ army in the Battle of Marathon.
  • KING XERXES
    The Second Persian Invasion of Greece
    Darius died in 486 BC, and his son Xerxes ascended the throne.
  • The Second Persian Invasion of Greece
    Xerxes started a full scale invasion of Greece.
  • Thermopylae and Artemisium
    The Greek city-states formed an alliance.
    Command of the army was given to Sparta.
    Command of the navy was given to Athens.
    The Athenian politician Themistocles suggested that Greek forces block Xerxes’ army at Thermopylae.
  • Why Thermopylae and Artemisium?
    Thermopylae is a narrow pass.
    The Greeks would easily be able to block it.
    The major weak point for the Greeks was a mountain track that could allow the Persians to outflank the Greeks. Troops were positioned there to block the route.
  • KING LEONIDAS
    GREEK WARRIOR
    The Battle of ThermopylaeGreek Forces
    The Greek army was led by the Spartan King Leonidas. There were about 7,000 Greeks blocking the pass.
  • PERSIAN WARRIORS
    KING XERXES I
    The Battle of ThermopylaePersian Forces
    The number of troops in Xerxes’ army is disputed, but modern scholars estimate in the range 70,000 to 300,000.
  • The Battle of ThermopylaeDay One
    Xerxes attacked the Greeks.
    The Greeks fought at the narrowest part of the pass.
    Many of Xerxes’ men were killed, and the Persian army was unable to make headway against the Greeks.
  • The Battle of ThermopylaeDay Two
    Xerxes attacked the Greeks once more.
    He fared no better than he had on the first.
    A Greek traitor named Ephialtes told Xerxes about the mountain track around Thermopylae and offered to guide Xerxes’ army.
  • The Battle of ThermopylaeDay Three
    Leonidas learned from a runner that the path had not been held, so he called a war council.
    Most of the army retreated, and only about 3,000 men remained.
    The remaining soldiers either surrendered or were killed.
    The Persians go through the pass, but had up to 20,000 fatalities.
  • The Aftermath
    Later, the Greeks won a victory at the Battle of Plataea, and destroyed much of the Persian army.
    The Greeks also defeated the Persian fleet at the Battle of Mycale.
    This ended the invasion of Greece.
  • The Significance
    The Battle of Thermopylae is famous because of the heroism of the forces that remained to fight when they knew they were doomed.
  • Thank You!
  • Questions?