Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
O.b. c 5 personality and values
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

O.b. c 5 personality and values

1,421

Published on

ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR, PERSONALITY AND VALUES, ROBBINS

ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR, PERSONALITY AND VALUES, ROBBINS

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,421
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
117
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. O.B. C-5 PERSONALITY AND VALUES Dr. Rajesh Kamath Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health, Manipal University
  • 2. PERSONALITY • Personality: The sum total of ways in which an individual reacts to and interacts with others. • It is important for us to describe it in terms of the measurable traits a person exhibits, because research has shown personality tests are useful in hiring decisions and help managers forecast who is best for a job.
  • 3. PERSONALITY • Personality tests: 1.Self report surveys in which individuals evaluate themselves on a series of factors Weaknesses:Impression management, Accuracy(eg.bad mood) 2.Observer ratings surveys – co worker or other observer - with or without the subject’s knowledge. Better predictor of success on the job.
  • 4. PERSONALITY • Personality Determinants: Which is more influential – Heredity or Environment? • Research suggests Heredity wins. • Twins raised apart have much in common. One set of twins – seperated for 39 years – raised 45 miles apart – same model and color car – chain smoked same brand of cigarette – owned dogs with the same name – regularly vacationed at the same beach 1,500 miles away.
  • 5. PERSONALITY • Researchers say Genetics accounts for 50% of the personality similarities between twins and more than 30% of the similarities in occupational and leisure interests. • The personalities of identical twins raised in different households are more similar to each other than to the personalities of siblings with whom the twins were raised.
  • 6. PERSONALITY • Personality may very well change over time. • People’s scores on measures of dependability tend to increase over time, as when young adults take on roles that require greater responsibility like starting a family and/or establishing a career.
  • 7. PERSONALITY • Frameworks for identifying and classifying Personality traits: • MYERS BRIGGS TYPE INDICATOR (MBTI) • THE BIG 5 MODEL
  • 8. PERSONALITY • MYERS BRIGGS TYPE INDICATOR (MBTI) • Most widely used personality assessment instrument in the world. • It is a 100 question personality test that asks people how they usually feel or act in particular situations.
  • 9. PERSONALITY • On the basis of their answers, individuals are classified as: (Every Indian Should Not Think and Feel for Japanese People) EXTRAVERTED ( E )- Outgoing, Social, Assertive INTROVERTED ( I )- Quiet, Shy SENSING ( S ) – Practical,Prefer Routine and Order. Focus on Details. INTUITIVE ( N )- Rely on Unconscious processes and look at the “Big Picture” THINKING ( T ) – Use Reason and Logic to handle problems. FEELING ( F ) - Rely on their personal values and emotions. JUDGING ( J ) – Want control and prefer their world to be structured and ordered. PERCEIVING ( P ) - Flexible and Spontaneous.
  • 10. PERSONALITY • These classifications together describe 16 personality types. • Ex: • INTJs (Introverted/Intuitive/Thinking/Judging) are Visionaries - Original minds – Great drive for their own ideas and purposes – Skeptical, critical, independent, determined, stubborn. • ESTJs (Extraverted/Sensing/Thinking/Judging) are Organisers – Realistic, Logical, Analytical, Decisive – Natural head for Business or Mechanics – Like to organise and run activities.
  • 11. PERSONALITY • ENTPs(Extraverted/Intuitive/Thinking/Perceiving) A book profiling 13 contemporary business people who created super successful firms like APPLE, FEDEX, HONDA, MICROSOFT AND SONY found that all were NTs (Intuitive Thinkers). Interesting because NTs represent only about 5 % of the population. • The MBTI is widely used by many organisations including GE, Citigroup, many hospitals and educational institutions and even the U.S. armed forces. • Evidence about it’s validity is mixed. • It can be a valuable tool for increasing self awareness and providing career guidance.
  • 12. PERSONALITY • THE BIG 5 PERSONALITY MODEL. • An impressive body of research supports this model. • The Big 5 Factors are: • 1. EXTRAVERSION – Captures our comfort level with relationships. Extraverts – assertive, sociable. Introverts – Quiet, shy. • 2. AGREEABLENESS – An individual’s propensity to DEFER to (not DIFFER with) others. ( How does DEFER DIFFER FROM DIFFER ) High - Cooperative, warm, trusting. Low - cold, antagonisitic.
  • 13. PERSONALITY • 3. CONSCIENTIOUSNESS : This dimension is a measure of reliability. High – Responsible, Organised, Dependable and Persistent. Low - Easily distracted, disorganised and unreliable. • 4. EMOTIONAL STABILITY – A person’s ability to withstand stress. High- Calm, Confident, Secure. Low –Nervous, Anxious, Depressed, Insecure. • 5. OPENNESS TO EXPERIENCE: Addresses range of interests and fascination with novelty. High – Creative, Curious, Artistically sensitive. Low – Conventional, Find comfort in the familiar.
  • 14. PERSONALITY BIG FIVE TRAITS WHY IS IT RELEVANT? WHAT DOES IT AFFECT? EMOTIONAL STABILITY •LESS NEGATIVE THINKING AND FEWER NEGATIVE EMOTIONS •LESS HYPER-VIGILANT •HIGHER JOB AND LIFE SATISFACTION •LOWER STRESS LEVELS EXTRAVERSION •BETTER INTERPERSONAL SKILLS •GREATER SOCIAL DOMINANCE •MORE EMOTIONALLY EXPRESSIVE •HIGHER PERFORMANCE •ENHANCED LEADERSHIP •HIGHER JOB AND LIFE SATISFACTION OPENNESS •INCREASED LEARNING •MORE CREATIVE •MORE FLEXIBLE AND AUTONOMOUS •ENHANCED LEADERSHIP •MORE ADAPTABLE TO CHANGE AGREEABLENESS •BETTER LIKED •MORE COMPLIANT AND CONFORMING •HIGHER PERFORMANCE •LOWER LEVELS OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOUR CONSCIENTIOUS NESS •GREATER EFFORT AND PERSISTENCE •MORE DRIVE AND DISCIPLINE •BETTER ORGANISED AND PLANNING •HIGHER PERFORMANCE •ENHANCED LEADERSHIP •GREATER LONGEVITY
  • 15. PERSONALITY • OTHER PERSONALITY TRAITS RELEVANT TO ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR: 1.CORE SELF EVALUATION 2.MACHIAVELLIANISM 3.NARCISSISM 4.SELF MONITORING 5. RISK TAKING 6. TYPE A PERSONALITY 7. PROACTIVE PERSONALITY
  • 16. PERSONALITY • 1. CORE SELF EVALUATION : The degree to which an individual likes or dislikes herself, whether the person sees herself as capable and effective, and whether the person feels in control of his or her environment or powerless over the environment. • People with high Core self evaluation perform better at jobs because they set more ambitious goals, are more committed to their goals, and persist longer. • Critical in professions like Sales and Life insurance. 90% of life insurance sales calls end in rejection, so an agent has to believe in herself to persist.
  • 17. PERSONALITY • 2. MACHIAVELLIANISM : The degree to which an individual is pragmatic, maintains emotional distance, and believes that ends can justify means. • “If it works, use it” – High Mach perspective. • Eg. Anant is a young bank manager in Mumbai – 3 promotions in the past 4 years – uses aggressive tactics – not apologetic for it – “I am prepared to do whatever I have to do to get ahead”. • High Machs manipulate more, win more, are persuaded less, and persuade others more than do low Machs. • High Machs like their jobs less, are more stressed by their work and engage In more deviant work behaviours. • High Machs flourish when 1. they interact face to face with others rather than indirectly. 2. minimum number of rules and regulations, allowing for improvisation 3. when low machs are distracted by emotional involvement with details irrelevant to winning. • Do well at Labour negotiations(bargaining skills) or commissioned sales(substantial rewards).
  • 18. PERSONALITY • 3. NARCISSISM : The tendency to be arrogant, have a grandiose sense of self importance, require excessive admiration, and have a sense of entitilement. • Eg. Sameer likes to be the center of attraction. He looks at himself in the mirror a lot, has extravagant dreams, and considers himself a person of many talents. • A study found that while narcissists thought they were better leaders than their colleagues, their supervisors actually rated them as worse. • Eg. An Oracle executive described CEO Larry Ellison – “The difference between God and Larry is that God does not believe he is Larry” • Treat others as if they were inferior. • Tend to be selfish, exploitative. • Rated as less effective at their jobs than others.
  • 19. PERSONALITY • 4. SELF MONITORING : A Personality trait that measures an individual’s ability to adjust his or her behaviour to external, situational factors. • Eg. Sheela is competent, hard working, productive, but gets very average appraisals. Her bosses are irritated with her. • She is politically inept. • She is unable to change her behaviour to fit changing situations. • She is a LOW SELF MONITOR. • HIGH SELF MONITORS – Pay close attention to behaviour of others, more capable of conforming. Receive better performance ratings, more likely to become leaders, show less commitment to organisation.
  • 20. PERSONALITY • 5. RISK TAKING : Affects how much time and information managers need to make a decision. • Work population differs in risk intensity. • It makes sense to recognise these differences and align them with specific job demands. • High - Stock trader-because of the need for rapid decision making • Low – Accountant – Auditing activities
  • 21. PERSONALITY • 6. TYPE A PERSONALITY : Aggressive involvement in a chronic, incessant struggle to achieve more and more in less and less time and, if necessary, against the opposing efforts of other things or other people. They exhibit the following characteristics: • Are always moving, walking, eating rapidly • Feel impatient with the rate at which most events take place. • Strive to think or do 2 or more things at a time. • Cannot cope with leisure time. • Are obsessed with numbers, measuring their success in terms of how many or how much of everything they acquire. • Type B is the opposite. • Type As do better than Type Bs in job interviews because they are more likely to be judged as having desirable traits such as high drive, competence and aggressiveness.
  • 22. PERSONALITY • 7. PROACTIVE PERSONALITY : People who identify opportunities, show initiative, take action, and persevere until meaningful change occurs. • Overcome obstacles, constraints. • Leaders, change agents. • More likely than others to achieve career success. • More likely to become Entrepreneurs.
  • 23. VALUES • VALUES : Basic convictions that a certain mode of conduct / end state of existence is personally or socially preferable to an opposite mode of conduct / end state of existence. • Eg. Is capital punishment right or wrong? • Values contain a judgement element. • Values have content (important) and intensity (how important) attributes • VALUE SYSTEM : Ranking of an individual’s values in terms of their intensity.
  • 24. VALUES • Values tend to be relatively stable and enduring. • Most values are established in the early years. As children we are told certain behaviours/outcomes are always desirable/always undesirable, with few gray areas. It is this “black-or-white” learning of values that ensures their stability and endurance.
  • 25. VALUES • Values influence Attitudes and Behaviours.Eg.:Suppose your value system says that allocating pay on the basis of performance is right, while allocating pay on the basis of seniority is wrong. How will you react if you find the organisation you have just joined rewards seniority and not performance. • You are likely to be disappointed • This can lead to Job dissatisfaction and a decision to not exert a high level of effort. • Your attitude and behaviour would be different if your values aligned with the organisation’s pay policies.
  • 26. VALUES • Terminal vs Instrumental values. • Terminal values: The goals a person would like to achieve during her/his lifetime. • Instrumental values: The means of achieving one’s terminal values. • Eg.: INSTRUMENTAL VALUE TERMINAL VALUE BEING RESPONSIBLE, DEPENDABLE, RELIABLE TRUE FRIENDSHIP AMBITIOUS A COMFORTABLE LIFE
  • 27. COHORT ENTERED THE WORKFORCE APPROXIMATE CURRENT AGE DOMINANT WORK VALUES SOCIALISTS 1950s – late 1980s 55+ Hardworking, Conservative, Conforming, Loyal to the organisation, Emphasis on a comfortable and secure life. LIBERALS Early 1990s to 2000 Mid 40s to Mid 50s Success, achievement, ambition, dislike of authority, loyalty to career. Xers 2000 - 2005 Late 20s to early 40s Work-life balance, dislike of rules, confident, want financial success, self-reliant, team oriented. MILLENIALS 2005 to present Early 20s Comfortable with technology, entrepreneurial, get rich quick, high sense of entitlement.
  • 28. PERSONALITY AND VALUES • John Holland’s Personality - Job Fit Theory identifies 6 personality types and proposes that the fit between personality type and occupational environment determines satisfaction and turnover. • Satisfaction is highest and Turnover lowest when Personality and Occupations are in agreement.
  • 29. TYPE PERSONALITY CHARACTERISTICS CONGRUENT OCCUPATIONS REALISTIC Shy, genuine, persistent, stable, conforming, practical Mechanic, drill press operator, assembly line worker, farmer INVESTIGATIVE Analytical, original, curious, independent Biologist, economist, mathematician, news reporter SOCIAL Sociable, friendly, cooperative, understanding Social worker, teacher, counsellor, clinical psycholigist CONVENTIONAL Conforming, efficient, practical, unimaginative, inflexible Accountant, corporate manager, bank teller, file clerk ENTERPRISING Self-confident, ambitious, energetic, domineering Lawyer, real estate agent, public relations specialist, small business manager ARTISTIC Imaginative, disorderly, idealistic, emotional, impractical Painter, Musician, Writer, Interior decorator
  • 30. Relationships among occupational personality types.(RIASEC)
  • 31. • References : • ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR - STEPHEN ROBBINS – 14TH EDITION
  • 32. THANK YOU

×