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Business etiqette in mumbai
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Business etiqette in mumbai

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Business etiqette in mumbai Business etiqette in mumbai Presentation Transcript

  • By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 1 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • The etiquette of business is the set of written and unwrittenrules of conduct that make social interactions run moresmoothly. Office etiquette in particular applies to coworkerinteraction, excluding interactions with external contacts suchas customers and suppliers. When conducting group meetingsin the United States, the assembly might follow Roberts Rulesof Order, if there are no other company policies to control ameeting. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 2 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Cultural differencesEtiquette is dependent on culture; what is excellent etiquette in one society mayshock another. Etiquette evolves within culture. The Dutch painter Andries Bothshows that the hunt for head lice (illustration, right), which had been a civilizedgrooming occupation in the early Middle Ages, a bonding experience thatreinforced the comparative rank of two people, one groomed, one groomer, hadbecome a peasant occupation by 1630. The painter portrays the familiaroperation matter-of-factly, without the disdain this subject would have receivedin a 19th-century representation. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 3 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Appearance Men are generally expected to wear a suit and tie for business,although the jacket may be removed in the summer. Women shouldwear conservative dresses or pantsuits. When dressing casual, short-sleeved shirts and long pants arepreferred for men; shorts are acceptable only when exercising. Womenmust keep their upper arms, chest, back, and legs covered at all times. Women should wear long pants when exercising. The use of leather products including belts or handbags may beconsidered offensive, especially in temples. Hindus revere cows and donot use leather products. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 4 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Behavior The head is considered the seat of the soul. Never touch someone else’s head, not even topat the hair of a child. Beckoning someone with the palm up and wagging one finger can be construed as in insult.Standing with your hands on your hips will be interpreted as an angry, aggressive posture. Whistling is impolite and winking may be interpreted as either an insult or a sexual proposition. Never point your feet at a person. Feet are considered unclean. If your shoes or feet touchanother person, apologize. Gifts are not opened in the presence of the giver. If you receive a wrapped gift, set it aside untilthe giver leaves. Business lunches are preferred to dinners. Hindus do not eat beef and Muslims do not eat pork. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 5 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Communications There are more than fourteen major and three hundred minor languages spoken in India. Theofficial languages are English and Hindi. English is widely used in business, politics and education. The word "no" has harsh implications in India. Evasive refusals are more common, and areconsidered more polite. Never directly refuse an invitation, a vague "I’ll try" is an acceptable refusal. Do not thank your hosts at the end of a meal. "Thank you" is considered a form of payment andtherefore insulting. Titles are very important. Always use professional titles. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 6 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 7 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • As Indias largest, most multicultural city, Mumbai is afairly liberal place and its business culture tends to beinformal and friendly—Mumbaikars are famous fortheir chalta hain (laid-back) attitude. However,traditions still hold in many areas of behaviour, andits wise to be prepared. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 8 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Do not expect western levels of speed and efficiency.Getting a document delivered by courier, sending afax, or simply gathering colleagues for a businessmeeting can all take far longer than seemsreasonable. The same goes for punctuality: ifsomeone promises to meet you in ten minutes,expect arrival in 20. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 9 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Mumbais traffic is notoriously bad: allow ample timeif you need to cross the city to get to a meeting. Whenchoosing your hotel, bear in mind where most of yourmeetings will take place. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 10 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • A handshake is the most common form of greeting, but some womenprefer to press their palms together in a traditional namaste greeting. Aman should wait for a woman to extend her hand before extending his,particularly if she is wearing traditional Indian clothing. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 11 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Bring plenty of business cards; you will behanding them out frequently, and not havingenough is considered rude. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 12 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Mumbaikar professionals tend to speak good English, though often witha heavy accent, imaginative grammar and liberal doses of local slang.Asking someone to repeat himself is perfectly acceptable; correcting hisEnglish is not. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 13 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Indians often over-promise in an effort to please:admitting a job is difficult to get done is oftenconsidered rude or weak. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 14 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Job descriptions in India tend to be strictly defined, in linewith the principle that a persons place in society is based onwhat they do. This can extend to routine office tasks thatwesterners are used to performing themselves. Be careful notto step on toes. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 15 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Men tend to wear business suits to meetings and lunches, butoften remove their jackets for dinner and at the office. Somecompanies maintain “casual Fridays”. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 16 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Breakfast meetings are rare; the working day tends to begin around9.30-10am. Business lunches tend to be leisurely affairs: 90 minutes isnot uncommon. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 17 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Many Indians are vegetarian for religious reasons. Meat-eating Hinduswill consume chicken and goat, but not beef or pork. Muslims will eat nopork; more observant Muslims will only eat halal (ritually slaughtered)meat. If you have invited someone to dinner, enquire about his eatinghabits before ordering steak or spare ribs. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 18 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Alcohol is usually avoided at lunch, less so at dinner. Indian women arenot always comfortable drinking in public or being in the company ofthose who do. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 19 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Favourite topics of conversation are politics, family, sport andfood. Commenting on Mumbais poverty, slums or beggarsshould be avoided. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 20 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Although the citys official name is now “Mumbai” (andpoliticians will favour the official term), many people still use“Bombay” in conversation. Go with the flow. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 21 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Particularly when money and data are being discussed, some Indianterminology is commonly used, such as lakh (one lakh = 100,000) andcrore (one crore = 10m). By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 22 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • Very little business gets done in Mumbai when a big cricketmatch is on. Visitors would do well to catch up on cricketnews, especially the latest exploits of Sachin Tendulkar, a localhero in Mumbai (he also owns Tendulkars, a well-regardedrestaurant). By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 23 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com
  • The citys most important festival is Diwali (Festival of Lights)in November, when business associates exchange small giftsand boxes of sweets or dried fruits. It is considered especiallyauspicious to start a new business or seal a deal at this time. By Dr.Rajesh Patel,Director,NRV MBA 11/13/2011 4:09:53 AM 24 ,email:1966patel@gmail.com