कनार्ळा      Elevation 249 m (816 ft)
                         249 m (816 ft)

Karnala fort   Location Pen
Karnala
While going on the Mumbai‐Goa highway we might have noticed a thumb like rock resting on a mountain. As 
 we leave...
View from Mumbai‐Goa 
        Highway
Un spoilt
       Un hurried
      Un touched
      Un confined
      Un expected
     Un conquered
     Un paralleled
    ...
Final Karnala
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Final Karnala

486 views

Published on

Published in: Travel, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
486
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Final Karnala

  1. 1. कनार्ळा Elevation 249 m (816 ft) 249 m (816 ft) Karnala fort Location Pen
  2. 2. Karnala While going on the Mumbai‐Goa highway we might have noticed a thumb like rock resting on a mountain. As  we leave Panvel, the road towards Pen goes through green forests, and suddenly we have a glimpse of this  pinnacle. That is the fort of Karnala; famous for its strange pinnacle and the bird sanctuary that is setup in  the forests below. This was an important fort and dates back to 12th or 13th century.  Till 15th century the fort was under Nizamshahi rule. When Shivaji wanted to capture the fort, his army  y j p , y initially surrounded the fort. They built temporary obstructions and continued to attack. After a few days,  they captured the fort. After that the Moguls, the Angres and Peshwas ruled the fort. In 1818, colonel  Prother of the British captured it. Finally the tricolour was furled here. However the cisterns here show that  the fort is ancient and dates back to 12th century.  y As we proceed ahead of Karmaidevi temple, we ascend through the main entrance door. Going right is the  way to the base of the pinnacle and the caves carved out in it. The northern face of the pinnacle houses  many beehives. Hence no sound should be made while going this way. Going rightwards we can see another  entrance, but the way here is bit difficult. If we go to the left side, there are remnants of old dwelling places.  entrance but the way here is bit difficult If we go to the left side there are remnants of old dwelling places Here are some tanks. There are many cisterns near the caves, but none of them contains potable water. A  cistern on the left side, near the remnants, towards steep side of the fort contains drinking water. We enter  the fort from northern side. Going southwards beyond the pinnacle, we can observe the ramparts in good  condition. We climb some steps and come to the southern Machi. This face of the pinnacle is clear and  condition We climb some steps and come to the southern Machi This face of the pinnacle is clear and suitable for rock climbers. A further southward is another bastion. On the entrance here are the carvings of  “SHARABH”, which is a legendary animal. Here are the remnants old constructions. On the western face,  there is not a clear way. Some caves are situated here. From the top of the fort we can see Prabalgad, Irshaalgad, Dhaak and forts of Rajmachi. On the west are  From the top of the fort we can see Prabalgad Irshaalgad Dhaak and forts of Rajmachi On the west are Mumbai and Elephanta islands. The forts visible from here show a strong network to keep a check on the  surrounding region..
  3. 3. View from Mumbai‐Goa  Highway
  4. 4. Un spoilt Un hurried Un touched Un confined Un expected Un conquered Un paralleled Un paralleled Un matched Un stressed Un stressed Un limited Standing as silent sentinels to history are the 350‐odd forts of Maharashtra. Beaten by  g y y the sea waves, lashed at by the torrential Deccan rains, or scorched in the blazing sun,  stand imposing ramparts and crumbling walls , the last lingering memories of  Maharashtra's martial times. Nowhere in the country would you encounter such a  profusion of forts. And such variety. Sited on an island, or guarding the seas or among  the Sahyadri hills, whose zig‐zag walls and rounded bastions sit like a scepter and  crown amidst hills turned mauve. 

×