Office Design - Ad Agency Interior Design
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Office Design - Ad Agency Interior Design

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Office Design - Ad Agency Interior Design

Office Design - Ad Agency Interior Design

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Office Design - Ad Agency Interior Design Office Design - Ad Agency Interior Design Presentation Transcript

  • Advertising Agency Redesign © Rebecca Jensen. 2013. All Rights Reserved. No part of this presentation or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials
  • Advertising Agency Redesign © Rebecca Jensen. 2013. All Rights Reserved. No part of this presentation or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials Introduction About The Project: AKQA, one of the most reputable digital advertising agencies on the West Coast has decided to open a new office in San Francisco. The building is located at 180 Montgomery Street at the heart of the Financial District, and AKQA has decided to purchase two adjoining levels in the building. The agency is known for their innovative, creative digital designs for clients like Nike, Gap, Fiat and Heineken. Incredibly tech-savvy, AKQA has a strong focus on internal collaboration and synergy between their technology, creative and client services. AKQA is looking for an interior design that connects all departments to collaborate. Their style can be described as modern, clean, cutting-edge and creative. As the designer on this project, I would like to represent the brand AKQA by using innovative materials, spatial design ideas and design features. Research: Designing for Collaboration In order to understand how people collaborate and work best, I did extensive research on effective office design strategies. While reading through several Herman Miller Reports, I found the following facts to be particularly relevant to my design decisions: • Design: Helping People Run into Each Other o “Some companies are coring the middle of buildings, adding atriums, and lining walkways in these areas with amenities like coffee bars and bank machines. The intent is to pull people away from the elevator and get them out in the open, where spontaneous interaction might blossom into a serendipitous encounter.” • “Offering a variety of workspaces, providing vertical space for display, and improving wayfinding can all help people collaborate” o “One emerging trend is to provide multiple types of spaces for workers to choose from, depending on their needs, because while open spaces improve communication, they aren’t ideal for every kind of work activity. Smaller rooms and alcoves a little off the beaten path can provide a person with the peace and quiet needed to synthesize a large amount of information and write a report. And there’s still a need for rooms where a person can make a phone call without being overheard.” o “People seek out meeting spaces when they need more privacy or different tools or because they are worried that the meeting will take long enough that it will constitute a real disruption to colleagues around them.” o “Decrease Individual Space; Increase Collaborative Space Free address within home zones—unassigned workstations within a department or project area—is a way of using space more effectively while still giving people a sense of place and rootedness.” • “Rooms with technology tools are used five times more often than rooms without. People are increasingly using flat screens as a collaborative tool, when they are available, rather than just for presentations.” • “When planning rooms for collaboration, proximity is important. The companies in our research that had centrally located collaborative spaces, like coffee bars, had the right idea. They understood the draw of social spaces that were close by.” • “[In selecting furniture], give workers ergonomic tools that give them the ability to vary their posture.” Google Case Study Google cultivates creativity through an approach they call Innovation Time Off. Engineers are encouraged to spend 20 percent of their time developing their own ideas, which often requires recruiting and collaborating with colleagues. Therefore, the floorplan mixes informal areas with work areas.
  • Advertising Agency Redesign © Rebecca Jensen. 2013. All Rights Reserved. No part of this presentation or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials User Needs As seen in my research, collaboration requires a mix of informal meeting spots, formal meeting rooms and workstations. In addition, technology plays a major role in as well. The staff need access to technology outlets as often as possible. People send information different ways, so the more ways I can create opportunities to communication, the better. Adjacencies are also important. The creative director should be near the art director, copy director and graphic studio. In addition, it’s important that the senior account executive is close by the account executive. Assistant workstations should also be close to the office in which the employees are assisting. In addition to these basic needs, see below for the program of spatial requirements: User Needs Bubble Diagram After considering the required adjacencies and program requirements, I developed this preliminary final bubble diagram.
  • Advertising Agency Redesign © Rebecca Jensen. 2013. All Rights Reserved. No part of this presentation or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials Concept Development Velocity. Speed. Direction. My concept is inspired by the book “Velocity” written by AKQA’s CEO. The book advocates continual change in speed and direction, as our world is changing faster than we can keep up. The book advocates seven principles which I hope to portray throughout the office space. In addition, I would like to play on the various curved & angular shapes, colors and signs associated with speed and new directions (as seen in my mood board). A major design feature will be the pneumatic tube transport system. To increase communication and collaboration, the pipe system will be installed throughout the office and will allow staff to send notes up the pipe vacuum to different parts of the office. In working with my concept, the system also symbolizes speed and new directions. + +
  • Advertising Agency Redesign © Rebecca Jensen. 2013. All Rights Reserved. No part of this presentation or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials Floor Plans
  • Advertising Agency Redesign © Rebecca Jensen. 2013. All Rights Reserved. No part of this presentation or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials Lobby Entrance Welcome to AKQA This lobby is meant to both excite and welcome the guest into the space. Upon walking in, the guest is immediately greeted with the pneumatic tube transport system, which allows users to send messages to different parts of the office. The curved desk is similar to that of a velocity chart and the cloud walls indicate the speed of a bullet striking through air. The reflective stainless steel surfaces are meant to serves as reminders to always evaluate ourselves and our progress. Ceramic Imitation Metal Tiles Haworth Swivel Chair - Red Fabric Stained Concrete Floor Coalesse Top Freestanding Table Stainless Steel Metal Tubes, Front Desk, Sign & Railings Cole & Sons Wallpaper
  • Advertising Agency Redesign © Rebecca Jensen. 2013. All Rights Reserved. No part of this presentation or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials Brainstorming Room Get Inspired This casual, relaxed brainstorming area features a large digital ceiling, which will change pictures randomly throughout the day. The panels are meant to offer inspirational guidance when staff hit “roadblocks.” The white benches can also be used as a platform for meetings, with a white board attached behind. The pneumatic tube transport system also enters through this room. Digital LED TV Ceiling Panels White Acrylic - Benches, Walls & Side Tables Bean Bag Chair Floor Bottom: Grey CarpetFloor Top: White Rug Brentano Bean Bag Fabric
  • Advertising Agency Redesign © Rebecca Jensen. 2013. All Rights Reserved. No part of this presentation or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials Large Conference Room Collaborate Since this room will be seen by clients of all sorts, this space is meant to be approachable, yet still represent AKQA’s fun, creative brand. The CEO’s 7 Laws are written on the wall, and acoustic tiles are placed behind the TV, since this room might get quite loud with a large occupancy. The light fixture’s triangular shape represents change or “delta symbol.” Haworth Swivel Chair - Red Fabric Steelcase Convene Table Offecct Acoustical Tile (Polyester with wool) Stained Concrete
  • Advertising Agency Redesign © Rebecca Jensen. 2013. All Rights Reserved. No part of this presentation or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials Elevations Kitchen Elevation With this communal kitchen area, my goal was to create yet another place for staff to “run into each other” and strike up casual conversations. Therefore, the space was intentionally placed in the center of the building. The dining tables were created to be more intimate: a place where staff can have casual meetings over lunch. They are basically mini-rooms that have walls along each seat back. Since technology is a strong user need, there is also a screen monitor hook-up at each table as well. Throughout the space, I wanted to play on the CEO’s 7 rules of velocity, so I found pictures that represent each rule and plan to strategically place them throughout the office. In this elevation, the backdrop is of a child digging into an apple, which represents Rule 4: Never Have Anything To Apologize For. Casual Seating Elevation With the concept of innovative collaboration in mind, this is another casual hang- out area located on the northern wall on the second floor. Like the kitchen, this is also meant to be a casual break-off area for staff to chat, brainstorm or relax. The photo behind the two sets of chairs represents Rule 3: Make Meaningful Connections. I wanted the photo to be the focal point, so I chose white chairs to blend in with the photo. *All photos selected in this these elevation renderings credit Joson Photography in San Francisco, CA.
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