Social Media Strategy 12 Month Sample Plan

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Social Media SWOT Analysis

Strengths
• New cutting edge Technology
• Quality and huge spectrum
• Availability of cash, strong balance sheet
• Superior execution skills
• Whole country license
• Respectable brand

Weaknesses
• New Team
• Complex Launch
• New Process
• Dependence on Infrastructure partners
• New untested 4G handsets
• Churn of Customers
• Customer Power
• Under developed eco-system


Opportunities
• Big Market (1300 million population)
• Low Internet penetration (11%)
• Low broad band penetration (4%)
• Higher % population below 25 years of age (55%)
• Low social media penetration (6%)
• Higher download speed
• Low legacy effect
• Lifestyle trends
• New business applications

Threats
• Uncertain Foreign Direct Investment
• Introduction of new/better technology
• Retaliation from existing players
• Government sanctions against social media
• Negative environment factors
• Unstable Government
• Vertical Integration

Integrated & Dynamically Consistent Strategy

Business Strategy
• To be number 1, market leader with 30% plus market share, 4G company in next 5 years


Digital Marketing Strategy
• To contribute 50% of company’s overall marketing contribution in the next 5 years (progressively from 20% in the 1st year)
• To have positive ROI on Digital Marketing Expenditure


Social Media Strategy
• To be an innovative Social Media integrated marketing team enabling Company’s overall business plan, business strategy and digital marketing strategy.
• To collaborate with all teams , functions and departments of the company
• To be the dominant and market leader with more than 30% share in 4G Social Media Marketing.
• To assist in all the phases of business and sales funnel towards conversion.
Business planning should start with defining clear goals, and social media is no exception. Without a clear idea of what you want to accomplish with social media, you are unlikely to achieve anything at all because your efforts will be scattered or aimless. In addition, different social media goals require different sets of action. For example, if your goal is to gain consumer credibility, that looks very different than if your goal is to convert 30 percent of prospects to sales.
Start by writing down at least three social media goals for your business. Make sure each goal is specific, realistic and measurable. It is vital to make your goals measurable so that you can track your business’ progress towards each goal. It’s also important that your goals for social media relate to your overall goals for your business.
My Business Social Media Goals Are:
1. ___________________________________________________
2. ___________________________________________________
3. ___________________________________________________

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Social Media Strategy 12 Month Sample Plan

  1. 1. 1 Course: Social Media Strategy (UCI) Subject: 12 Month Social Media Strategy & Action Plan From: Rajendra Singh LinkedIn - in.linkedin.com/in/rajendrakumarsingh/ Twitter – rajendra8singh To: Prof Burgess (Instructor) Date: 25th May 2014 ‘’The final project will be a PowerPoint presentation to summarize the 12 month social media strategy plan. You can summarize the monthly activity or provide more detail -- that is up to you. But, essentially, I am looking for a snapshot of the overall strategy. Create a sufficient number of PPT slides to tell your story in a presentation. If you want to include the 12 month social media strategy template, you can do so as an attachment. Make sure to include an executive summary up front.’’ Prof Burgess
  2. 2. 2 The Details are prepared for Including Social Media as part of business launch for a new company in India with planned launch for 4G Mobile Services having estimated investment of 12 Billion USD. This is basically a Primer For Social Media Strategy. Being part of Executive Team of the Company this will be my input to the Strategy, Marketing and Social Media team. I won’t be the Marketing or Strategy of Social Media Manger.
  3. 3. 3 Background of Market (1) India  Population 1300 million  Mobile penetration – 75%  Internet penetration < 12%  Broadband penetration <5%  Smartphone penetration <15%  Camera phone >60% (800 million)  PC penetration <5%  TV penetration >80%  Social media penetration <7%  (Facebook highest <7%)  Population below age of 25 >55%  Biggest democratic market in the world where people have freedom of expression
  4. 4. 4 Background of Market (2) India  States - 35  Districts - 740  Villages - 638,000  Religion – Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist, Sikh, Christian, etc.  Languages - >16, English – 5% penetration  Festivals - >100  Entertainment – Films, Music, Sports, Cricket  Internet/Digital Skills - Excellent  Very varied population, many interest, photo upload, music , etc.  Democratic country – Multi party  “Great possibilities of expression”  Lends well to Social Media
  5. 5. 5 4G Industry Composition  4G  Mobile  Digital  Devices  Mobile phones, Laptops, Tablets  Replacement  Retail  Service  Ecommerce, Education, Health  Location based  Mobile Apps  Web-Design, Development  Security  Government Regulations  Vendors  Video Conferencing  Competition: 2G, 3G, CDMA, 1x, EVDO, VoIP, 4G
  6. 6. 6 Why Social Media? Some facts, statistics & Insights 1. An average Facebook users has 130 friends. (source: AllTwitter) 2. Monthly active users now total nearly 850 million. (source: Jeff Bullas) 3. 21 percent of Facebook users are from Asia, which is only less than 4 percent of Asia's population. (source: Uberly) 4. 488 million users regularly use Facebook mobile. (source: All Facebook) 5. 23 percent of Facebook's users check their account 5 or more times daily. (source:Socialnomics) 6. More than 1 million websites have integrated with Facebook in various ways. (source:Uberly) 7. 250 million photos are uploaded to Facebook every day. (source: Jeff Bullas) 8. As of 2012, 210,000 years of music have been played on Facebook. (source: Gizmodo) 9. Links about sex are shared 90 percent more than any other link. (source: AllTwitter) 10. As of 2012, 17 billion location-tagged posts and check-ins were logged. (source:Gizmodo) 11. 80 percent of social media users prefer to connect with brands through Facebook. (source: Business2Community) 12. A whopping 77 percent of B2C companies and 43 percent of B2B companies acquired customers from Facebook. (source: Business2Community) 13. There are 175 million tweets sent from Twitter every day in 2012. (source: Infographics Labs) 14. The average Twitter user has tweeted 307 times. (source: Diego Basch's Blog) 15. Since the dawn of Twitter, there's been a total of 163 billion tweets. (source: Diego Basch's Blog) 16. The average user follows (or is followed by) 51 people. (source: Diego Basch's Blog) 17. 50 percent of Twitter users are using the social network via mobile. (source: Microsoft tag) 18. In August 2012, Instagram hit 80 million users and counting. (source: Visual.ly) 19. In August 2012, Instagram had an average of 7.3 million daily active users. (source: All Things D)
  7. 7. 7 20. The average Instagram user spent 257 minutes accessing the photo-sharing site via mobile device in August, while the average Twitter user over the same period spent 170 minutes viewing. (source: All Things D) 21. 34 percent of marketers have generated leads using Twitter. (source: Digital Buzz Blog) 22. 80 percent of Pinterest users are women, while 50 percent of all Pinterest users have children. (source: Search Engine Journal) 23. Pinterest referrals spend 70 percent more money than visitors referred from non-social channels. (source: Search Engine Journal) 24. 28.1 percent of Pinterest users have an annual household income of $100,000. (source:Ultralinx) 25. Total unique visitors to Pinterest increased by 2,702.2 percent since May 2011. (source:Ultralinx) 26. 69 percent of online consumers who visit Pinterest have found an item they've bought or wanted to buy, compared with 40 percent of Facebook users. (source: All Facebook) 27. Over 1/5 of Facebook-connected users are on Pinterest daily, which represents more than 2 million members. (source: AppData) 28. The most popular age group on Pinterest is 25 - 34 year olds. (source: AllTwitter) 29. The Google +1 button is used 5 billion times per day. (source: AllTwitter) 30. 48 percent of fortune global 100 companies are now on Google+. (source: Burson- Marsteller) 31. Google+ pages appear in search results for 30 percent of brand term searches for brands with G+ pages, up from 5 percent in February 2012. (source: Bright Edge) 32. Only 8 percent of Americans 12+ have a Google+ profile page. (source: Edison Research) 33. 625,000 new users on Google+ every day. (source: AllTwitter) 34. Websites using the +1 button generate 3.5x the Google+ visits than sites without the button. (source: HubSpot) 35. At least 60 percent of Google+ users log in daily. (source: tecmark) 36. At least 80 percent of Google+ users engage on a weekly basis. (source: Chris Brogan)
  8. 8. 8 We enter the fast and curvy track now. India – Big Opportunity
  9. 9. 9 Is It Better to Be Strategic ? Executive Summary Here is a brief presentation about the Social Media Strategy for a new company. The Company is launching 4G Mobile Services in India, the fastest growing Data and Voice market in the World. Social Media has evolved to play a key role in Business, Strategy, Marketing, Customer, Employee and Shareholders engagement. More and more people are connecting to the Internet—and for longer amounts of time whether through a computer or mobile phone, consumers continue to spend increasing amounts of time on the Internet. SIMULTANEOUS SMARTPHONE AND TABLET USAGE WHILE WATCHING TV Having a mobile device on-hand while watching TV has become an integral part of consumer routines—41 percent of tablet owners and 38 percent of smartphone owners use their device daily while in front of their TV screen. Not surprisingly, social networking is a top activity on both devices, but people aren’t just chatting with their social connections, they’re also shopping and looking up relevant program and product info. SOCIAL CARE Social care, i.e. customer service via social media, has become an immediate imperative for global brands. Customers choose when and where they voice their questions, issues and
  10. 10. 10 complaints, blurring the line between marketing and customer service. Brands should consider this evolution and ensure they are ready to react on all channels. ADVERTISING ON SOCIAL MEDIA Brands and advertisers looking to share their message on social might consider this: While a third of people find ads on social networks to be annoying, more than a quarter of people are more likely to pay attention to an ad posted by a friend. THE CONSUMER DECISION JOURNEY FREQUENCY OF SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Frequency of Social Activities. Percent of social media users participating at least once a month 70% (Hear others' experiences), 65% (Learn more about brands/products/services), 53% (Compliment Brands), 50% (Express Concerns/Complaints about Brands/Services), 47% (Share Money Incentives). The days when companies could tightly control brand messaging and progress consumers along a linear purchase funnel have long ended. Social media has fundamentally changed the consumer decision journey. Consumer decisions and behaviors are increasingly driven by the opinions, tastes and preferences of an exponentially larger, global pool of friends, peers and influencers. The role of social media in the consumer decision journey extends beyond North America, and indeed is even more pronounced in other regions. Social media’s influence on purchase intent is strong across all regions, but strongest among online consumers in the Asia-Pacific, Latin America and Middle East / Africa markets. Thirty percent of online consumers in the Middle East / Africa region and 29 percent in Asia- Pacific use social media on a daily basis to learn more about brands/products/services, with one-third of respondents in both regions connecting on a weekly basis. Across all regions, social media has the potential to influence consumers’ entertainment and home electronics purchase decisions. These categories are followed closely by: Travel/Leisure (60%), Appliances (58%), Food/Beverages (58%), Clothing/Fashion (58%) and Restaurants (57%). These categories were also the most discussed products/services via social networking. Social media represents a huge opportunity for brands to gain positive favor with consumers. With growing disposable income in emerging markets, savvy marketers can harness the growing adoption and influence of social media to impact business.
  11. 11. 11 SOCIAL MEDIA IS COMING OF AGE Social media and social networking are no longer in their infancy. Since the emergence of the first social media networks some two decades ago, social media has continued to evolve and offer consumers around the world new and meaningful ways to engage with the people, events, and brands that matter to them. Now years later, social media is still growing rapidly and has become an integral part of our daily lives. Today, social networking is truly a global phenomenon. What’s driving the continued growth of social media? Social Media Platform MOBILE More people are using Smartphone and tablets to access social media. The personal computer is still at the center of the social networking experience, but consumers are increasingly looking to other devices to connect on social media. Time spent on mobile apps and the mobile web account for 63 percent of the year-over-year growth in overall time spent using social media. Forty-six percent of social media users say they use their Smartphone to access social media; 16 percent say they connect to social media using a tablet. With more connectivity, consumers have more freedom to use social media wherever and whenever they want. PROLIFERATION New social media sites continue to emerge and catch on. The number of social media networks consumers can choose from has exploded, and too many sites to count are adding social features or integration. While Facebook and Twitter continue to be among the most popular social networks, Pinterest emerged as one of the breakout stars in social media for 2012, boasting the largest year-over-year increase in both unique audience and time spent of any social network across PC, mobile web, and apps. How is consumer usage of social media evolving? THE GLOBAL LIVING ROOM Social TV is on the rise. The skyrocketing adoption and use of social media among consumers is transforming TV-watching into a more immediate and shared experience. As of June 2012, more than 33 percent of Twitter users had actively tweeted about TV-related content. Some 44 percent of U.S. tablet owners and 38 percent of U.S. Smartphone owners use their devices daily to access social media while watching television. In the Latin America region, more than 50 percent of consumers say they interact with social media while watching TV; in the Middle East / Africa region, more than 60 percent do. From global events like the Summer Olympics, to regional events like the Presidential debates in the
  12. 12. 12 U.S., consumers around the world used social media to engage with everyone from close friends to complete strangers, revolutionizing the television viewing experience. SOCIAL CARE Social Care is transforming customer service. Social media has emerged as an important channel for customer service, with nearly half of U.S. consumers reaching out directly to brands and service providers to voice their satisfaction or complaints, or simply to ask questions. In fact, one in three social media users say they prefer to use social media rather than the phone for customer service issues. How is social media impacting marketing? SOCIAL WORD-OF-MOUTH Social media enables consumers to generate and tap into the opinions of an exponentially larger universe. While word-of-mouth has always been important, its scope was previously limited to the people you knew and interacted with on a daily basis. Social media has removed that limitation and given new power to consumers. HYPER-INFORMED CONSUMERS Social media is transforming the way that consumers across the globe make purchase decisions. Consumers around the world are using social media to learn about other consumers’ experiences, find more information about brands, products and services, and to find deals and purchase incentives. OPPORTUNITY FOR ENGAGEMENT Consumer attitudes toward advertising on social media are still evolving. Though roughly one-third of social media users find ads on social networking sites more annoying than other types of Internet advertisements, research suggest that there are opportunities for marketers to engage with consumers via social media. More than a quarter of social media users say they are more likely to pay attention to an ad shared by one of their social connections. Additionally, more than a quarter of consumers are ok with seeing ads on social networking sites tailored to them based on their profile information. One more view from IBM. Marketing digitization-following the consumer Social media is re-shaping the way organizations engage their customers and nurture their relationship to brands, products and
  13. 13. 13 services. Here are some figures that give an idea of the scale of the social media phenomenon:  1.43 billion people worldwide visited a social networking site last year  Nearly 1 in 8 people worldwide have their own Facebook page  Last year, one million new accounts were added to Twitter everyday  Three million new blogs come online every month  65 percent of social media users say they use it to learn more about brands, products and services For marketers, a good portion of social media’s value lies in its ability to aggregate communities of interest, identify specific demographics and thus enable marketers to precisely segment and engage their audience. The goal is to monetize these outputs — to capture the interaction with a brand, product or service, and distil from this information the drivers of preference and ultimately purchase. A social media strategy, then, seeks to carefully balance message and media with specific consumer segments. This balance is possible because the technology is now available to capture consumer preferences and opinions expressed through social media and apply predictive capabilities to identify new opportunities and determine patterns and propensities to influence and advocate. Companies can then act on this insight by integrating it with one-to-one marketing automation solutions to pinpoint campaigns to specific segments, driving consumer advocacy and ultimately revenue. As social media becomes a standard component of most organizations’ marketing mix and a source of rich customer insight, its spend is being scrutinized, with better justification and metrics required to engage a vast social media landscape. This analysis requires a rich analytics environment, one which is transformative in its ability to offer a consolidated, global view of customer data and deliver actionable insight. Social media can be a catalyst to help companies achieve:  Inluence and intimacy. Social media amplifies the “relationship” in customer relationship management (CRM). Consumers trust their peers. And companies have the ability to aggregate and segment consumer data fairly easily.  Scale and speed. Social media channels enable marketers to reach more customers faster, dynamically, and with greater precision. It can take months of planning, creative development and media purchases to launch a print ad campaign, compared to the immediacy of Twitter and Facebook campaigns.  Lower costs. Social media offers dramatically lower costs to precisely target and engage audiences across multiple channels, segments and locations.
  14. 14. 14 Social media enable organizations to connect and engage consumers in a unique way, but also personalize and monetize customer relationships on a sustained basis to ultimately improve profitability.
  15. 15. 15 4G Business Persona and Targeted Audience In 1st twelve months targeted audience is the current smart phone users, current broadband users, data users, current social media users, influencers, opinion leaders, early technology adopters, annual income> USD 25,000, who have unmet needs of faster download, more secure technology, better handsets, global level new services and the fatigue of using legacy services. Illusive and Ever Changing Network
  16. 16. 16 Company Profile  A new company with 4G license for the entire territory of India  6 billion USD have been invested in Spectrum and Licensing  Another 6 billion USD have been earmarked to launch 4G services  This will be biggest 4G launch in the world in terms of scale and market size  Company is already an oil giant (exploration, drilling, etc.)  Company is already a retail giant in India (kind of Wal-Mart)  Company has insignificant digital marketing/social media presence, strong traditional marketing  Will start from scratch New Beginning 
  17. 17. 17 Strategy and Organization Map: Integrated View 1. Strategy  Planning / Formation  Execution 2. Traditional Marketing 9. Finance 3. Digital Marketing (Internet, Social Media, Web, SEO, Agile) 5. Innovation 6. Technology  Evaluation  Deployment  Monetization 7. Patent / IPR 4. Business Analytics 8. Decision Making 10. Process 11. People Massive & Rapid Business Growth Engine 11 Nuggets
  18. 18. 18
  19. 19. 19 Social Media SWOT Analysis – New 4G Company Strengths  New cutting edge Technology  Quality and huge spectrum  Availability of cash, strong balance sheet  Superior execution skills  Whole country license  Respectable brand Weaknesses  New Team  Complex Launch  New Process  Dependence on Infrastructure partners  New untested 4G handsets  Churn of Customers  Customer Power  Under developed eco-system
  20. 20. 20 Social Media SWOT Analysis – New 4G Company Opportunities  Big Market (1300 million population)  Low Internet penetration (11%)  Low broad band penetration (4%)  Higher % population below 25 years of age (55%)  Low social media penetration (6%)  Higher download speed  Low legacy effect  Lifestyle trends  New business applications Threats  Uncertain Foreign Direct Investment  Introduction of new/better technology  Retaliation from existing players  Government sanctions against social media  Negative environment factors  Unstable Government  Vertical Integration
  21. 21. 21 4G Company to be Launched – Keywords to be focused Brand Competition Target Market Industry Other Company name/Website name/Product or Service names/Leaders Competitor Names Words or phrases that describe target market Words or phrases relevant to your industry All possible related keywords Aircel 4G handsets Churn Video Conference 4G Idea 3G handsets Acquisition Zero cost 3G Loop Fast download Connection Prepaid 2G Tata Data Security Monthly bill Postpaid 1X Bharati Latest handsets Internet Post dated cheque EVDO Vodafone Essar Ltd. Latest laptops Apple Credit history CDMA BSNL Internet of things Dongle Value added services Verizon MTNL M2M DB level BTS AT&T Download speed Indoor Coverage Call drop Vodafone New Customer Netork failure Airtel Cheap services GSM Airtime MVNO High class service NOC New technology TCP/IP
  22. 22. 22 Integrated & Dynamically Consistent Strategy Business Strategy  To be number 1, market leader with 30% plus market share, 4G company in next 5 years Digital Marketing Strategy  To contribute 50% of company’s overall marketing contribution in the next 5 years (progressively from 20% in the 1st year)  To have positive ROI on Digital Marketing Expenditure Social Media Strategy  To be an innovative Social Media integrated marketing team enabling Company’s overall business plan, business strategy and digital marketing strategy.  To collaborate with all teams , functions and departments of the company  To be the dominant and market leader with more than 30% share in 4G Social Media Marketing.  To assist in all the phases of business and sales funnel towards conversion.
  23. 23. 23 12 – Months Plan / Action - Self Social Media The following are the actions for social media itself in first 12 months  Understand new Company’s Business Plan  Understand Company’s Technology Plan  Understand Competition Landscape  Write SWOT  Understand demographics  Understand and prepare “Persona & Audience”  Understand organization structure  Meet Top Management and take inputs and agree for weekly discussion  Create Social Media team as part of Overall Marketing Team and Digital Marketing Team  Finalise Social Media KPIs, Metrics and align them to larger objectives of Company, Marketing and Digital Marketing  Prepare and take approval for Social Media Budget for 12 months (Approximately 100 million USD)  Shortlist, appoint and onboard strategic vendors and consultants  Evaluate and finalise Social Media Channels (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, etc.)  Create website and widgets  Start tie-ups with external agencies  Start Blog (to be calendarised and written by CEO, CTO, CIO, CMO, etc.) Targeted date of Blog – Tuesday 10.00 am.  Create Social Media PR Team and Crisis Management process  Establish Social Media Analytics and Measurement  Start Social Media Content creation, Curation and Release
  24. 24. 24 12 Months – Others Integrated Working and participation of Social Marketing with other functions/departments The following are function wise various initiatives in which social media can partner and collaborate with other functions of the company  Strategy: Planning/formation, execution, feedback, double looping, competition analysis, influencing external factors like Government  People/HR: Hiring, recruitment, on boarding, talent assessment, training, retention, optimized compensation and benefit, morale building, communication, best place to work inputs, policy formulation, talent stickiness, change management  Innovation: Idea generation, crowd sourcing, idea evaluation, design thinking, concept testing, market sizing, competition intelligence, strategic insights  Technology: Evaluation, deployment, monetization, external/expert opinion, life cycle management, total cost management, strategic inputs  Patent/IPR: Breach information, advance information, protection, deployment, monetization, information analysis, insights  Traditional Marketing: Proper mapping of paid/owned/earned media, cost management, idea testing, ROI, integration, speed, change management, pricing, competition activities, market inputs, customer service, reach, customer life cycle management, brand building, appropriate amplification and advancement of required messages, right selection of signals from crowded noise
  25. 25. 25  Digital Marketing: Lead generation, listening, opinion management, audience profiling, crisis management, cost optimization, customer acquisition-retention-conversion, SEO/SEM, customer service, CRM, integration, life cycle management of product, service and customer  Analytics: Web analytics, social media tool inputs, vendor management, hypothesis testing, assumption challenging, agile project management, big data analytics  Process: Training, deployment, evaluation, customer/employee feedback, benchmarking, competition insights  Decision Making: Uncertainty evaluation, in time risk mitigation, timely feedback, credibility, trust, quality, speed, diagnosis, optimization  Finance: Cost management, fund raising, budgeting, ROI, assumption building, share holder involvement, appropriate and timely 2-way dissemination of information.
  26. 26. 26 The Social Media Strategy Template 5 Points
  27. 27. 27 1.Clarify Your Business’ Social Media Goals Getting Started In order to gain customer trust, establish expertise, and meet potential customers, every business needs to have a social media presence. It’s simply not enough to have social media sites up for your business; without a clear strategy for social media use, your business will struggle to get the customer engagement levels and increased sales you’re looking for. To get the most out of your social media efforts, your strategy should include the following: Step 1: Clarify Your Business’ Social Media Goals All business planning should start with defining clear goals, and social media is no exception. Without a clear idea of what you want to accomplish with social media, you are unlikely to achieve anything at all because your efforts will be scattered or aimless. In addition, different social media goals require different sets of action. For example, if your goal is to gain consumer credibility, that looks very different than if your goal is to convert 30 percent of prospects to sales. Start by writing down at least three social media goals for your business. Make sure each goal is specific, realistic and measurable. It is vital to make your goals measurable so that you can track your business’ progress towards each goal. To test how measurable your goal is, ask yourself what it will look like when partially or completely achieved. If you don’t know, you need to continue working on the goal’s measurability. It’s also important that your goals for social media relate to your overall goals for your business. Rather than choosing social media goals arbitrarily, make sure these goals tie in with your overall sales, marketing and productivity goals.
  28. 28. 28 2. Audit Your Current Social Media Status Take Current Social Media Inventory Start by conducting a search for both officially sanctioned and unauthorized pages representing your company. These could be fan sites, rogue employee sites or malicious sites posing as you or your company. Check the pages to see how many followers you have, how much activity is on the page and whether all links work. If any of your pages have become overrun with spam, sign on and delete it. My Business’ Social Media Log Distribute Surveys If you’re not currently on social media at all, your first step is to figure out which sites would be most beneficial for you to use. You can do that by inviting current customers to complete a survey online or in store. Consider offering an appropriate incentive to your customers for completing the survey, like a discount or coupon. Collect demographic information as well as information about which social media sites your customers use. If you already have some sort of social media presence, post a similar survey on your social media pages as well as providing it to customers after purchase. My Business Survey Results
  29. 29. 29 Search for Your Competitors’ Pages Investigate what your top competitors are doing online. Check out their social media pages on each social media network to see how much of a presence they have. In addition to checking out whether your competitors have a social media presence, it’s important to analyze their existing pages. Ask yourself what each of your competitors does well and does not do well on social media. You can use this analysis to help you in crafting your social media strategy.
  30. 30. 30 3.Develop Your Content Strategy All of the work you’ve done in the previous steps should now enable you to develop a comprehensive content strategy for your social media campaign. Your content strategy should include: As part of your content strategy, you should create an editorial calendar. Your editorial calendar lists the dates you intend to post blogs, Facebook posts and other content you may plan to use during your social media campaigns. Check out this sample editorial calendar, then create your own. An example of an editorial calendar. Pro to schedule posts to as many social media sites as you’d like. Remember to put your scheduled posts on your editorial calendar so you don’t forget about them.
  31. 31. 31 4.a) Guide to Social Media Metrics: Measuring Mentions Mentions The first social metric you need to track is volume of mentions, which is the size of a conversation. Depending on your job role or function, you’ll want to track mentions for several different keywords such as your company, brand name, product or service, industry, the competition or a particular market term. This will give you a complete picture of the social conversations that matter most. Mentions are simply the number of times the term or phrase you’re tracking was used across social media, helping you understand just how much (or little) attention the subject is receiving in social. How to Measure Mentions: Mention volume is a simple (but tasking) counting metric. You can invest in a social media marketing platform that will automatically track the number of mentions for a specific search term for you. Or, you can count tweets, wall posts, etc. How to Use Mentions: Establish a Baseline  Track mentions in recurring time periods (daily, weekly, etc) to establish the typical volume.  Record benchmarks so you can accurately measure growth over time. Take Action  Find the right windows to engage. Are there certain days or times when mentions increase? o Marketing should rearrange its content schedule to capture the attention of an active audience. o Customer service and sales should be online and ready to engage with clients or prospects.  React to spikes in mentions. o PR should investigate a spike in brand mentions as it could signal a positive brand story they should amplify or a negative one they’ll need to get ahead of to prevent a potential crisis. o A product team needs to understand the cause for a surge in market terms or features and evaluate how or if they need to react. o Marketing should prepare competitive positioning when top competitors see a surge in volume.  Use mentions to track if campaigns, product launches or other initiatives are gaining traction. Did mentions increase after launch? Are they remaining stagnant? Monitor mentions closely and consider making tweaks if you’re not seeing a reaction.
  32. 32. 32 4.b) Guide to Social Media Metrics: Reach and Exposure We’ll break down reach and exposure. Reach and exposure are often used interchangeably as they both represent the size of your potential audience. However, they do differ slightly. Reach Reach is the potential audience for a message based on total follower count (Twitter, Pinterest and LinkedIn followers, total Likes on your Facebook page, etc). If your boards have 1,000 followers on Pinterest, then each of your pins could potentially reach 1,000 people. It’s important to note that Facebook provides its own analytics around reach, which it defines as “the number of people who saw your post”. Facebook considers a post to reach someone when it’s shown in that person’s News Feed. They also provide “total reach,” which includes the number of unique people who saw any activity from a Page as well as paid vs. organic reach. Exposure Exposure further expands on your potential audience by measuring not just the number of your followers, but the number of followers each of your followers have. Each time a person shares something in social, it is delivered to their list of followers—each instance is called an impression. And those impressions are included in a message’s exposure. For example, if your company’s latest tweet was retweeted by a Twitter user with 10,000 followers, then the exposure for that tweet would include the number of impressions based on your audience plus the 10,000 impressions based on that specific user’s audience. Of course, not everyone who receives a post in their social feeds will read it, which is why exposure measures the potential audience. How to Measure Reach and Exposure: To measure your reach, you would tally your following on each social network— number of Twitter followers, Facebook page likes, LinkedIn followers or connections, Pinterest followers, etc. You can keep track of these stats manually or can use the analytics reports provided by each social network. Measuring exposure on your own can be a bit tricky, especially if you’re looking to track the impressions of a particular campaign or market team. Quality social media management or analytics platforms will automatically track exposure for you. Or if you want to measure your content’s exposure manually, you can tally up your total follower count as well as each time your content is shared in social. For example, on Pinterest you would track the number of repins and the number of followers those
  33. 33. 33 who repined your post have, as well as pins from your website or blog. Focus on the sharing stats for each platform—retweets, shares, likes etc.—as well as links from your website or blog to calculate your average number of impressions. How to Use Reach and Exposure:  Track reach on each social network over time to determine where you’re seeing the most growth.  Use exposure to measure the spread of a conversation to evaluate the success.  Inform future initiatives. Determine what’s resonating with your audience by finding what types of content or messaging received the highest exposure. Use that research to perfect future campaigns or content creation.  Track competitors’ exposure to view potential share of voice.  Compare exposure to mentions to find potential influencers. If a specific post’s exposure was many times higher than its mentions, someone with a large social following is clearly distributing the content. Research the influencer and find ways to work together.  Combine exposure and reach with engagement metrics to help form a more complete understanding of impact.
  34. 34. 34 4.c) Guide to Social Media Metrics: Sentiment Sentiment Sentiment refers to the emotion behind a social media mention. It’s a way to measure the tone of the conversation—is the person happy, annoyed, angry? Sentiment adds important context to social conversations. Without it, measurement of mentions alone could be misleading. If you were measuring mentions for your company’s new product, you might assume a surge in mentions meant it was being well received. After all, more mentions = more people talking about the product. But what if all those mentions were negative? Measuring sentiment will help you understand the overall feeling surrounding a particular subject, enabling you to create a broader and more complete picture of the social conversations that matter to you. How to Measure Sentiment: Measuring sentiment on your own can be quite a time commitment, depending on the size of the conversation. To record the sentiment of mentions, you would read each one, evaluate the tone and assign a score such as positive, negative or neutral. There are a few free tools available that track and measure sentiment and quality social media marketing platforms will provide automatic sentiment analysis. The uberVU via HootSuite platform uses a powerful automation tool to determine sentiment, which is based on machine learning technology. If a person was to tweet about their experience shopping at Sears, the sentiment would be determined based on the description words they use. “Such great deals at Sears!” would register as positive whereas “Customer service at Sears is the worst.” would register as negative. How to Use Sentiment: Evaluate Brand Health  Analyzing sentiment on a regular basis will help you understand people’s feelings towards your brand, company or your product or service.  Consider using a tool that provides automatic sentiment analysis to get a quick overview of your brand health without having to dive into each individual mention. Head Off a Crisis  Watch your sentiment level for any signals that could indicate a dramatic shift in brand health.
  35. 35. 35  A sudden spike in negative mentions could be an indication of a developing crisis. Loop in your PR department, dive into the mentions to find the cause, and establish a plan for handling the rise in negativity. Competitive Research  Sentiment analysis can also be used to find how your brand or product is being perceived in comparison to your top competitors.  Keep an eye on the overall sentiment level of competitors and find opportunities (positive and negative) that you can use to shape your positioning against theirs. Evaluate Campaigns and Other Initiatives  Use sentiment levels to measure the success of product launches, marketing campaigns or other new initiatives.  Track how levels change throughout the duration of the initiative to establish if it is being received positively or negatively. Consider adjusting your strategy if negativity rises.  Did your increased sentiment level remain post campaign? Use the sentiment research to inform and perfect future initiatives.
  36. 36. 36 5. Use Analytics to Track Progress Once you’ve begun your social media campaign, don’t sit back and keep doing the same thing over and over. Instead, check your analytics frequently to see how your campaign is performing.  Use your preferred analytics tool to find out who’s reading, responding and reposting your social media posts. Hootsuite Pro offers advanced analytics and reporting for your social media measurement needs.  Use Facebook Insights to find out when your fans are online, how many are seeing your posts and who’s sharing or responding.  Google Analytics can show you who’s viewing and engaging with your web pages. Remember to match your analytics up with your goals. Examine data that measures your specific progress towards your objectives so you can ensure you are on the right path. Build the capacity for measurement into every social action. Use URL shorteners, like our own Ow.ly links, to track your click-throughs. With the Ow.ly tool you can see a quick snapshot of the number of clicks on any link you shortened within HootSuite, insight that you can use to determine what Tweets and posts resonate most with your followers. If 800 people click on a URL in a funny Tweet promoting your new shopping app but only 200 people click on a URL in a more serious Tweet, this knowledge can be applied in future posts. In other words, URL click data can be used to increase the chances of your followers clicking a link. Reporting can also go much deeper. With HootSuite you can use data gained from uberVU, Webtrends, Facebook Insights, Google Analytics, Google+ Pages Analytics, Twitter Profile Stats, our own custom ow.ly Click Stats and more to generate easy, drag and drop social analytics reports shared easily by email. More importantly, you can analyze that data to optimize future programs and messaging.
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  38. 38. 38 Creating a Social Media Strategy : Granular Details( Details to be filled in after due consultation) 5 Steps
  39. 39. 39 Step 1: Clarify Your Business’ Social Media Goals All business planning should start with defining clear goals, and social media is no exception. Without a clear idea of what you want to accomplish with social media, you are unlikely to achieve anything at all because your efforts will be scattered or aimless. In addition, different social media goals require different sets of action. For example, if your goal is to gain consumer credibility, that looks very different than if your goal is to convert 30 percent of prospects to sales. Start by writing down at least three social media goals for your business. Make sure each goal is specific, realistic and measurable. It is vital to make your goals measurable so that you can track your business’ progress towards each goal. To test how measurable your goal is, ask yourself what it will look like when partially or completely achieved. If you don’t know, you need to continue working on the goal’s measurability. It’s also important that your goals for social media relate to your overall goals for your business. Rather than choosing social media goals arbitrarily, make sure these goals tie in with your overall sales, marketing and productivity goals. My Business Social Media Goals Are: 1. ________________________________________________________________ 2. ________________________________________________________________ 3. ________________________________________________________________
  40. 40. 40 Step 2: Audit Your Current Social Media Status Prior to creating your social media strategy, you need to assess your current social media use and how it is working for you. This requires figuring out who is currently connecting to you via social media, which social media sites your target market uses and how your social media presence compares to your competitors’.Take Current Social Media Inventory Start by conducting a search for both officially sanctioned and unauthorized pages representing your company. These could be fan sites, rogue employee sites or malicious sites posing as you or your company. Check the pages to see how many followers you have, how much activity is on the page and whether all links work. If any of your pages have become overrun with spam, sign on and delete it. My Business’ Social Media Log Social Media Site URL Followers Last Activity Date 1. 2. 3. Distribute Surveys If you’re not currently on social media at all, your first step is to figure out which sites would be most beneficial for you to use. You can do that by inviting current customers to complete a survey online or in store. Consider offering an appropriate incentive to your customers for completing the survey, like a discount or coupon. Collect demographic information as well as information about which social media sites your customers use. If you
  41. 41. 41 already have some sort of social media presence, post a similar survey on your social media pages as well as providing it to customers after purchase. My Business Survey Results Number of respondents_____ Average age_____ % Male_____ % Female_____ % on Facebook_____ % on Twitter_____ % on LinkedIn_____ % on Other_____ Search for Your Competitors’ Pages Investigate what your top competitors are doing online. Check out their social media pages on each social media network to see how much of a presence they have. In addition to checking out whether your competitors have a social media presence, it’s important to analyze their existing pages. Ask yourself what each of your competitors does well and does not do well on social media. You can use this analysis to help you in crafting your social media strategy. Guide to Creating a Social Media Strategy | 3Social Media Network Strengths Weaknesses Competitor #1 Competitor #2 My Company
  42. 42. 42 Step 3: Develop Your Content Strategy All of the work you’ve done in the previous steps should now enable you to develop a comprehensive content strategy for your social media campaign. Your content strategy should include: # What type(s) of content you intend to post and promote via social media # How often you will post the content # Target audience for each type of content # Who will create the content # How you will promote the content As part of your content strategy, you should create an editorial calendar. Your editorial calendar lists the dates you intend to post blogs, Facebook posts and other content you may plan to use during your social media campaigns. Check out this sample editorial calendar, then create your own. Your content strategy may also involve creating posts in advance to be posted later. Remember to put your scheduled posts on your editorial calendar so you don’t forget about them. Editorial Calendar in detail to be worked out.
  43. 43. 43 Step 4: Use Analytics to Track Progress Once you’ve begun your social media campaign, don’t sit back and keep doing the same thing over and over. Instead, check your analytics frequently to see how your campaign is performing. • Use your preferred analytics tool to find out who’s reading, responding and reposting your social media posts. Hootsuite Pro offers advanced analytics and reporting for your social media measurement needs. • Use Facebook Insights to find out when your fans are online, how many are seeing your posts and who’s sharing or responding. • Google Analytics can show you who’s viewing and engaging with your web pages. Remember to match your analytics up with your goals. Examine data that measures your specific progress towards your objectives so you can ensure you are on the right path.
  44. 44. 44 Step 5: Adjust Your Strategy as Needed Once you’ve analyzed your current campaign, resolve to do more of what is working and revise things that are not working. Re-write your content strategy based on your analysis to reflect your new understanding. You will need to keep developing your strategy and content and using analytics to guide your next step throughout your social media campaign. My New Social Media Strategy The following worked well to reach my goal of __________________________________________________________: 1. 2. The following did not work so well: 1. 2. My goal for the next period is ___________________________________ In order to reach that goal, I will make these changes in my social media strategy: 1. 2. 3
  45. 45. 45 Thank You

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