5173 Raj Dhamelia .. 5208 Parth Rasania
..
Guided BY.. Ingitamam Jain
K.S. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
The process by which people translate sensory
impressions into a coherent and unified view of the
world around them. Thoug...
Perception in marketing is described as a process
by which a consumer identifies, organizes, and
interprets information to...
“ ”
A marketing concept that encompasses a customer's
impression, awareness and/or consciousness about a
company or its offer...
ELEMENTS
OF
PERCEPTION
1.Sensation
2.Absolute threshold
3.Differential threshold
4.Subliminal perception
The immediate and direct response of the sensory
organs to stimuli. A stimulus is any unit of input to any
of the senses....
Sensory function are to see, hear , smell, test, and feel…
Energy of Change may making more effective sensation in
Consu...
2. Absolute Threshold..
The absolute threshold is the lowest level at which an
individual can experience a sensation.
Poin...
3. Differential Threshold
Minimal difference that can be detected between two
similar stimuli
Also known as the just not...
GERMAN SCIENTIST ERNST WEBER
He discovered that the j.n.d.
between two stimuli was not an
absolute amount, but an amount
r...
Example
According to Weber’s Law An additional level of
stimulus equivalent to the j.n.d. must be added for the
majority o...
Marketers need to determine the relevant j.n.d. for
their products
so that negative changes are not readily discernible ...
Stimuli that are too weak or too brief to be consciously seen or
heard may be strong enough to be perceived by one or more...
CONSCIOUS AWARENESS AND CHANGES
“EXPRESS YOURSELF”
Extensive research has shown no evidence that
subliminal advertising can cause behavior changes
Some evidence that subli...
DYNAMICS OF
PERCEPTION
Human Beings stimuli change during every minute
and every hour of every day..
Physical stimuli from outside Environment....
Selection
Organization
Interpretation
PERCEPTUAL
SELECTION
Consumers subconsciously are selective as to what they
perceive.
An individual may look at some things, ignore others, a...
X
 Lady at Super mall.. .
Stimuli selected depends on two major factors
Consumers’ previous experience
Consumers’ motives
Selection depends on t...
SELECTIVE
PERCEPTION
Selective
Exposure
Selective Attention
Perceptual
Defense
Perceptual
Blocking
 Consumers seek out
messages which:
 A...
Selective Exposure
Selective
Attention
Perceptual
Defense
Perceptual
Blocking
 Heightened
awareness when
stimuli meet...
Selective Exposure
Selective Attention
Perceptual
Defense
Perceptual
Blocking
 Screening out of
stimuli which are
thr...
Selective Exposure
Selective Attention
Perceptual
Defense
Perceptual
Blocking
 Consumers avoid
being bombarded by:
 ...
PERCEPTUAL
ORGANIZATION
Figure and
ground
Grouping
Closure
 People tend to organize
perceptions into figure-
and-ground
relationships.
 The g...
Figure and ground
Grouping
Closure
 People group stimuli
to form a unified
impression or
concept.
 Grouping helps
mem...
Figure and ground
Grouping
Closure
 People have a need for
closure and organize
perceptions to form a
complete picture...
PERCEPTUAL
INTERPRETATION
Physical
Appearances
Stereotypes
First Impressions
Jumping to
Conclusions
Halo Effect
 Positive attributes of
people...
Physical
Appearances
Stereotypes
First Impressions
Jumping to
Conclusions
Halo Effect
 People hold meanings
related ...
Physical
Appearances
Stereotypes
First Impressions
Jumping to
Conclusions
Halo Effect
 First impressions are
lasting...
Physical
Appearances
Stereotypes
First Impressions
Jumping to
Conclusions
Halo Effect
 People tend not to
listen to ...
Physical
Appearances
Stereotypes
First Impressions
Jumping to
Conclusions
Halo Effect
 Consumers perceive
and evalua...
The halo effect
helps Adidas
break into new
product
categories.
THANK
YOU
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
Consumer perception
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Consumer perception

  1. 1. 5173 Raj Dhamelia .. 5208 Parth Rasania .. Guided BY.. Ingitamam Jain K.S. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
  2. 2. The process by which people translate sensory impressions into a coherent and unified view of the world around them. Though necessarily based on incomplete and unverified (or unreliable) information. Perception is equated with reality for most practical purposes and guides human behavior in general.
  3. 3. Perception in marketing is described as a process by which a consumer identifies, organizes, and interprets information to create meaning.
  4. 4. “ ”
  5. 5. A marketing concept that encompasses a customer's impression, awareness and/or consciousness about a company or its offerings.  Customer perception is typically affected by advertising, reviews, public relations, social media, personal experiences and other channels.
  6. 6. ELEMENTS OF PERCEPTION
  7. 7. 1.Sensation 2.Absolute threshold 3.Differential threshold 4.Subliminal perception
  8. 8. The immediate and direct response of the sensory organs to stimuli. A stimulus is any unit of input to any of the senses. Excitement , agitation, commotion, dry Ginger,,, Product, packages, Brand name, Advertisement and Commercials… Sensory Receptors
  9. 9. Sensory function are to see, hear , smell, test, and feel… Energy of Change may making more effective sensation in Consumer’s Mind.. Change should be unique - Traffic Signal ( Horn )
  10. 10. 2. Absolute Threshold.. The absolute threshold is the lowest level at which an individual can experience a sensation. Point at which a person can detect a difference between “Something” and “Nothing” is the person’s absolute threshold for the stimulus. Ex. Driver of car see the billboard on the road different from the back seated person..
  11. 11. 3. Differential Threshold Minimal difference that can be detected between two similar stimuli Also known as the just noticeable difference ( the j.n.d.)
  12. 12. GERMAN SCIENTIST ERNST WEBER He discovered that the j.n.d. between two stimuli was not an absolute amount, but an amount relative to the intensity of the first stimuli. Weber’s law states that the stronger the initial stimulus, the greater the additional intensity needed for the second stimulus to be perceived as different.
  13. 13. Example According to Weber’s Law An additional level of stimulus equivalent to the j.n.d. must be added for the majority of the people to perceive a difference between the resulting stimulus and the initial stimulus.
  14. 14. Marketers need to determine the relevant j.n.d. for their products so that negative changes are not readily discernible to the public so that product improvements are very apparent to consumers
  15. 15. Stimuli that are too weak or too brief to be consciously seen or heard may be strong enough to be perceived by one or more receptor cells. This process is called subliminal perception because the stimulus is down the threshold.
  16. 16. CONSCIOUS AWARENESS AND CHANGES “EXPRESS YOURSELF”
  17. 17. Extensive research has shown no evidence that subliminal advertising can cause behavior changes Some evidence that subliminal stimuli may influence affective reactions
  18. 18. DYNAMICS OF PERCEPTION
  19. 19. Human Beings stimuli change during every minute and every hour of every day.. Physical stimuli from outside Environment.. Other inputs are provided by individual themselves ( Based on previous experience )
  20. 20. Selection Organization Interpretation
  21. 21. PERCEPTUAL SELECTION
  22. 22. Consumers subconsciously are selective as to what they perceive. An individual may look at some things, ignore others, and turn away from still others.
  23. 23. X  Lady at Super mall.. .
  24. 24. Stimuli selected depends on two major factors Consumers’ previous experience Consumers’ motives Selection depends on the Nature of the stimulus Expectations Motives
  25. 25. SELECTIVE PERCEPTION
  26. 26. Selective Exposure Selective Attention Perceptual Defense Perceptual Blocking  Consumers seek out messages which:  Are pleasant  They can sympathize  Reassure them of good purchases Concepts
  27. 27. Selective Exposure Selective Attention Perceptual Defense Perceptual Blocking  Heightened awareness when stimuli meet their needs  Consumers prefer different messages and medium Concepts
  28. 28. Selective Exposure Selective Attention Perceptual Defense Perceptual Blocking  Screening out of stimuli which are threatening Concepts
  29. 29. Selective Exposure Selective Attention Perceptual Defense Perceptual Blocking  Consumers avoid being bombarded by:  Tuning out  TiVo Concepts
  30. 30. PERCEPTUAL ORGANIZATION
  31. 31. Figure and ground Grouping Closure  People tend to organize perceptions into figure- and-ground relationships.  The ground is usually hazy.  Marketers usually design so the figure is the noticed stimuli. Principles
  32. 32. Figure and ground Grouping Closure  People group stimuli to form a unified impression or concept.  Grouping helps memory and recall. Principles
  33. 33. Figure and ground Grouping Closure  People have a need for closure and organize perceptions to form a complete picture.  Will often fill in missing pieces  Incomplete messages remembered more than complete Principles
  34. 34. PERCEPTUAL INTERPRETATION
  35. 35. Physical Appearances Stereotypes First Impressions Jumping to Conclusions Halo Effect  Positive attributes of people they know to those who resemble them  Important for model selection  Attractive models are more persuasive for some products Perceptual Distortion
  36. 36. Physical Appearances Stereotypes First Impressions Jumping to Conclusions Halo Effect  People hold meanings related to stimuli  Stereotypes influence how stimuli are perceived Perceptual Distortion
  37. 37. Physical Appearances Stereotypes First Impressions Jumping to Conclusions Halo Effect  First impressions are lasting  The perceiver is trying to determine which stimuli are relevant, important, or predictive Perceptual Distortion
  38. 38. Physical Appearances Stereotypes First Impressions Jumping to Conclusions Halo Effect  People tend not to listen to all the information before making conclusion  Important to put persuasive arguments first in advertising Perceptual Distortion
  39. 39. Physical Appearances Stereotypes First Impressions Jumping to Conclusions Halo Effect  Consumers perceive and evaluate multiple objects based on just one dimension  Used in licensing of names  Important with spokesperson choice Perceptual Distortion
  40. 40. The halo effect helps Adidas break into new product categories.
  41. 41. THANK YOU
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