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Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange
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Whistleblowing-- with detailed case studies on Jeffrey Wigand & Paul Assange

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This presentation was Done for the B. Tech 2nd year for the Value and ethics subject. Hoping Others find this useful. Thank You.

This presentation was Done for the B. Tech 2nd year for the Value and ethics subject. Hoping Others find this useful. Thank You.

Published in: News & Politics, Career, Business
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  • 1. Whistle Blowing
  • 2. What is whistle blowing? A whistleblower is a person who exposes misconduct, alleged dishonest or illegal activity occurring in an organization. Often called “making a disclosure in the public interest.
  • 3. The term coined by US civic activist Ralph Nader
  • 4. Types of whistle blowing?
  • 5. 1-Internal: if the complaint is made within the organisation. 2. external: if the complaint is made to an outside body, like newspaper and other forms of media.
  • 6. 1. From the people’s point of view 1. need for truth 2. The trust factor 3. Better relation between the general public and company.
  • 7. 1. Accuses whistle blowers of breaching the confidentiality agreement. 2. CAN view whistle blowing as an act towards money and fame.
  • 8. 1. Caught up between integrity, commitment and truth. 2. The consequences of the blowing the “whistle” is pretty immense and heavy.
  • 9. Protection laws Whistleblower protection refers to laws and regulation that offers protection who exposes wrongdoing and dishonest activities. The wrongdoing may take the form of fraud, corruption or mismanagement. Also, it offers punishment against false or frivolous complaints.
  • 10. In America: It was first brought into action in 1989. it protects whistle blowers who work in a government firm. a federal agency violates this act if the company concerned takes
  • 11. Concerning India It was passed by the Lok Sabha on 27th December, 2011 and by Rajya Sabha on 21st February, 2014 and is still waiting president’s assent.
  • 12. Satyanendra Dubey He was an Ex-iitan and an IES officer. Assassinated on 27th November, 2003 for Exposing and fighting corruption on the Golden Quadraliteral project of National Highway Authority Of India.
  • 13. Julian Assange is an Australian publisher and journalist. He is the controversial founder of the whistleblower website WikiLeaks which releases sensitive and or classified documents which have embarrassed leaders worldwide.
  • 14. WikiLeaks has been involved in the publication of material documenting extrajudicial killings in Kenya, a report of toxic waste dumping on the coast of Côte d'Ivoire, Church of Scientology manuals, Guantanamo Bay detention camp procedures, the 12 July 2007 Baghdad airstrike video, and material involving large banks such as Kaupthing and Julius Baer among other documents. WikiLeaks became internationally well known in 2010 when it began to publish U.S. military and diplomatic documents with assistance from its partners in the news media.
  • 15.  “You have to start with the truth. The truth is the only way that we can get anywhere. Because any decision-making that is based upon lies or ignorance can't lead to a good conclusion.”  “Large newspapers are routinely censored by legal costs. It is time this stopped. It is time a country said, enough is enough, justice must be seen, history must be preserved, and we will give shelter from the storm.”  “Intelligence agencies keep things secret because they often violate the rule of law or of good behavior.”
  • 16. “Case Study”  Going Inside Of the “ The INSIDER” or the  “ The Man Who Knew Too Much”
  • 17.  Jeffrey Wigand was the head of R&D in Brown and Williamson Tobacco Company, recruited to reduce the toxicity of the Cigarettes.
  • 18. What made him to blow the whistle?  B&W were aware of dangers Wigand’s research would cost. Kendrick Wells, attorney at B&W made sure that employees didn’t track company’s research works.  B&W clearly risked lives of many , by publishing reports stating ‘Increased Biological Activity’, coded for carcinogenic activities.  During his last years of stay at B&W, he started investigating additives to tobacco products, which led to conflict with the then Chairperson of B&W,” Thomas Sandefur”. Ultimately, he was alleged of poor performance and poor communication skills, and was fired.
  • 19. Risks Undertaken By “ Insider’’  Contractual obligation.  Internal Whistle Blowing.  Applying Utilitarianism.  Applying Virtue of ethics.  Moral conflict.
  • 20. SWOT analysis of Jeffrey Wigand S - He was a ethical and robust person who had the confidence to rise voice against unethical and wrong activities in the company. W – He perceived the things so quickly and took action on it , he also became greedy for money. O – He had the opportunity to stop the company from involving in unethical or illegal activity and get a big amount of money. T – He will never be appointed by any other company in future.
  • 21. Depiction in popular culture  Wigand’s prolific story was so enthralling , that it was turned into a biopic.  Directed by Michael Mann , the film stars Al Pacino and Russell Crowe.
  • 22. • • Edward Joseph Snowden is an American computer specialist, former employee of the Central Intelligence Agency and former contractor for the National Security Agency.
  • 23.  Whistle Blowers in some areas are not without legal support. In United States, both federal and state laws are aimed at protecting those who undertake whistle blowing.  However, even with this support, the potential whistle blower must still contemplate a difficult and dangerous path.  The primary protection law is the Federal Whistle Blower Protection Act of 1989  Another Federal Law is the False Claims Act, which has been around since 1863  Many state governments have passed their own whistle blower protection acts
  • 24. Is the act of whistle blowing justified…? A legitimate claim: The right motive Other alternatives have been exhausted ??Small personal sacrifice??: Re-Visiting Employee Loyalty
  • 25. Conclusions…  A whistle blowing incident is probably the most emotionally difficult thing you can experience as a professional  Not every incident that should result in whistle blowing does, sometimes the whistle is “swallowed” rather than blown  In some cases, there are federal and state laws meant to provide protection for the whistle blowers  If you find yourself in a possible whistle-blowing incident, you should exhaust all internal alternatives for addressing the problem and accumulate all documentation possible. If blowing the whistle becomes the only alternative, then you should anticipate a job change and you should get good legal representation

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