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Presentation space1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Sugges&ng  Space  or  Depth  on  a  Two-­‐Dimensional  Surface  The  loca)on  of  objects  is  judged  in  rela)on  to  the  horizon  line  (eye  level).  The  bo;om  of  the  picture  plane  or  drawing  format  is  seen  as  the  closest  visual  point  to  the  viewer.  The  degree  to  which  a  form  rises  on  the  picture  plane  towards  the  horizon  line  indicates  receding  spa)al  posi)ons.    Wayne  Thiebaud,  “Lips&cks”  1972  Pastel  on  paper  
  • 2. Overlapping:  If  one  object  covers  part  of  the  surface  of  another  object,  overlapping  occurs  and  the  first  object  is  assumed  to  be  nearer.      Size:  Two  objects  or  forms  that  are  in  reality  the  same  size  will  appear  different  in  size  depending  on  their  proximity  to  us.   Student  work:  The  size   and  placement  of  these   figures  creates  a  strong   illusion  of  depth  and   space.    
  • 3. Sharp  and  Diminishing  Detail:  Close  objects  appear  sharp  and  clear  in  defini)on,  while  objects  seen  at  a  distance  appear  blurred  and  lacking  in  defini)on,  focus,  and  detail.  Close  objects  will  reveal  more  texture  then  distant  objects.    Close  objects  will  reveal  a  fuller  valurange  (higher  contrast),  while  distant  objects  will  reveal  a  limited  value  range  with  a  reduc)on  in  strong  darks  and  lights  (low  contrast).  e  High  contrast  advances,  while  low  contrast  recedes.    This  is  related  to  the  concept  of  Atmospheric  Perspec&ve.    
  • 4. Student  work:  This  drawing  uses  changes  in  contrast  and  detail  to  reinforce  depth  and  space.    The  forms  in  the  foreground  are  sharp  and  clear,  with  detail  and  full  value  contrast.    The  forms  in  the  background  are  soIer  in  focus  with  less  value  contrast  and  detail.      
  • 5. Georges  Seurat,  French,  Winter,  nte  crayon  on  paper  1881co  
  • 6. Atmospheric  Perspec&ve  describes  characteris)cs  seen  in   objects  seen  at  a  distance  from  the  observer.    A  veil  of   atmospheric  haze  affects  and  decreases  clarity,  contrast,   detail,  and  color.    Atmospheric  perspec)ve  is  a  powerful   compliment  to  linear  perspec)ve.      
  • 7. Da  Vinci  observed  differences  between  the  subject  and  objects  in  the  background,  and  used  atmospheric  perspec)ve  to  create  the  illusion  of  depth:  the  farther  something  is  in  the  distance,  the  smaller  the  scale,  the  more  muted  the  colors  and  the  less  detailed  the  outlines.    Leonardo  Da  Vinci    
  • 8. Wayne  Thiebaud  
  • 9. Jane  Freilicher    
  • 10. Richard  Diebenkorn