Decision Making         Edited by     Devi Rajnikanth IBS Case Development Centre
Icfai BooksTM# 71, Nagarjuna Hills,Punjagutta, Hyderabad – 500082Andhra Pradesh, INDIAPhone: 91 - 40 - 23435387/91, Fax: 9...
Contents           Managerial Decision Making and Long-term           Effectiveness           The Organisational Learning ...
P R E L U D EA Danish proverb says, “He who has a choice has trouble.” Every decisionever taken is borne out of choices. S...
to do with Jerome Kerviel, the Societe Generale’s former junior equityderivatives trader. He is being investigated for for...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Decision making

239 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
239
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Decision making

  1. 1. Decision Making Edited by Devi Rajnikanth IBS Case Development Centre
  2. 2. Icfai BooksTM# 71, Nagarjuna Hills,Punjagutta, Hyderabad – 500082Andhra Pradesh, INDIAPhone: 91 - 40 - 23435387/91, Fax: 91 - 40 - 23435386e-mail: icfaibooks@icfai.org, ibscdc@icfai.orgWebsite: www.books.iupindia.org, www.ibscdc.org© 2009 The Institute of Chartered Financial Analysts of India. All rights reserved.No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmittedin any form or by any means – electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise –without prior permission in writing from the Icfai University Press.While every care has been taken to avoid errors and omissions, this publication isbeing sold on the condition and understanding that the information given in the bookis merely for reference and must not be taken as having authority of or being binding inany way on the authors, editors, publishers or sellers.Icfai Books, IB and the IB logo are trademarks of the Icfai University Press. Any otherproduct or corporate names, that may be registered trademarks, are used in the bookonly for the purpose of identification and explanation, without any intent to infringe.Other than the publisher, no individual or organization is permitted to export this bookfrom India.Case studies are intended to be used as a basis for class discussion rather than toillustrate either effective or ineffective handling of a management situation.Copies of individual case studies are available for purchase from www.ibscdc.orgISBN: 978-81-314-1571-9Editorial Team: Ivaturi Murali Krishna and Deepa VermaVisualiser and Designer: P. Damodara Siva PrasadThe views and content of this book are solely of the author(s)/editor(s). The author(s)/editor(s) of thebook has/have taken all reasonable care to ensure that the contents of the book do not violate anyexisting copyright or other intellectual property rights of any person in any manner whatsoever. In theevent the author(s)/editor(s) has/have been unable to track any source and if any copyright has beeninadvertently infringed, please notify the publisher in writing for corrective action.
  3. 3. Contents Managerial Decision Making and Long-term Effectiveness The Organisational Learning 1–12 Interview with Samuel E. Bodily 13–16 A Scientific Approach for Making Decisions Don’t Leave it Up to Chance 17–22 The Eight Keys to Making Great Decisions Conquer Crisis 23–28 Interview with David J. Snowden 29–32Ethics, Biases and Strategic Decision Making The Balancing Act 33–42 Interview with Bettina Büchel 43–46 The Conscious Manager Zen for Decision Makers 47–56 The Anatomy of a Decision The Customer Perspective 57–66 Interview with Colin Carnall 67–72 Diversification in Developed and Emerging Countries 73–84 How to Facilitate the Executive Decision Interview with George Wright 85–92 Interview with David Teece 93–98 Interview with Derek W. Bunn 99–103
  4. 4. P R E L U D EA Danish proverb says, “He who has a choice has trouble.” Every decisionever taken is borne out of choices. Successes as well as failures are theresults of decisions. What then distinguishes success and failure? Gooddecisions and bad decisions. “Nothing is more difficult, and thereforemore precious, than to be able to decide”, Napoleon said. After all,decisions are the essence of management. They’re what managersdo – sitting around all day making (or avoiding) decisions. Managers arejudged on the outcomes and most of them have only the foggiest ideahow the workforce operates to meet their targets.Many books, reports, articles, etc., have been written on decision-making.Two that were really concise and insightful were Fortune’s 75th Anniversaryspecial (June 27th 2005) on how to make great decisions and HBR’s January2006 issue on decision making.In Fortune (June 27th 2005), Jim Collins made a lucid distinction betweenbad decisions and wrong decisions. A wrong decision is picking DoorNo.1 when the prize is actually behind Door No.2 It’s a disappointingresult, but the fault lies with the method. A bad decision is launching thespace shuttle Challenger whenMorton Thiokol’s engineers predict “Decisions are the essence of management. They’rea nearly 100% chance of catastrophe. what managers do – sittingThe decision, in this case, was by no around all day making (ormeans feasible. The distinction is avoiding) decisions.”important, because it separates ‘outcomes’, which you can’t control, from‘process’, which you can. Wrong decisions are an inevitable part of life.But bad decisions are unforced errors. They’re certainly avoidable andthere are proven techniques to avoid the most predictable pitfalls.In the light of this distinction, how do you characterise the following twoevents’ decisions? The first is to do with Nick Leeson. The accumulatedtrading losses of over $1 billion by Barings Bank trader Nick Leeson led toone of the most spectacular collapses in banking history. And the second is
  5. 5. to do with Jerome Kerviel, the Societe Generale’s former junior equityderivatives trader. He is being investigated for forgery, breach of trust andunauthorised use of a computer in connection with unhedged transactions that allegedly left SocGen a victim of “The impact of anyone’s decisions is farreaching, a near ¤5 billion (£3.7 billion) rogue managers’ decisions have trading fraud. In both the cases while particular significance two rogue traders were at the heart of because they affect all the people who report to them the disaster, it was actually the result and the businesses they of a complex web of decisions – manage. ” personal, managerial and societal.Every manager faces a myriad of decisions every day from the time hewakes up in the morning until the time he goes to sleep at night. Someof these decisions are fairly mundane, but others have a significant impacton the future of his life, his organisation, and his career. Making theright decisions is crucial. While the impact of anyone’s decisions isfarreaching, managers’ decisions have particular significance because theyaffect all the people who report to them and the businesses they manage.For this reason, making better decisions is a key concern of managersand their organisations.

×