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How Far to Lean                 Implementing performance                   improvement measures                    in a Le...
Session Objectives Overview  of environment Lean principles Former state Kaizen process and desired outcomes Future s...
Work Environment Primary  environment is manufacturing Publishing is a service environment within  the manufacturing env...
Lean Principles Add   nothing but value     eliminate “muta” (waste)     increase cost-to-value ratio Center on the pe...
Seven Wastes of LeanFor manufacturing:      For services:Overproduction         Extra contentInventory              Re...
Former State Catalyst   for change:     Company move from traditional development      cycle to continuous development  ...
Kaizen EventsA  Japanese word meaning gradual and  orderly, continuous improvement “Blitz” event intended to improve an ...
Future StateTraditional measures: Service measures:Touches: 31% ↓       Touches: 31% ↓Cycle Time: 75% ↓    Meetings : ...
Outcomes Intended    improvements:     Shorten turn cycle for documentation     Better process improves accuracy Bonus...
Discussion of Results Lean  thinking identifies “in the box”  improvements Lateral thinking identifies “out of the box” ...
Resources   Michael L. George, Lean Six Sigma for Service:    How to Use Lean Speed and Six Sigma Quality    to Improve S...
How Far to Lean
How Far to Lean
How Far to Lean
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How Far to Lean

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Applying Lean principles to the production of content requires a bit of adaptation, to make Lean work in a service, rather than manufacturing, environment.

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Transcript of "How Far to Lean"

  1. 1. How Far to Lean Implementing performance improvement measures in a Lean environmentRahel Anne Bailie Nina JuncoIntentional Design Inc.
  2. 2. Session Objectives Overview of environment Lean principles Former state Kaizen process and desired outcomes Future state Outcomes Q&A Evaluation
  3. 3. Work Environment Primary environment is manufacturing Publishing is a service environment within the manufacturing environment Traditional values  Emphasis on engineering  Lack of appreciation of technical communication as a skill/profession Lots of corporate and product changes
  4. 4. Lean Principles Add nothing but value  eliminate “muta” (waste)  increase cost-to-value ratio Center on the people who add value Flow value from demand (delay commitment) Optimize across organizations
  5. 5. Seven Wastes of LeanFor manufacturing: For services:Overproduction Extra contentInventory RequirementsExtra processing steps Extra stepsMotion Finding informationDefects Changes arising from uncaught errorsWaiting WaitingTransportation Hand-offs
  6. 6. Former State Catalyst for change:  Company move from traditional development cycle to continuous development  Department already at production capacity  Long turn cycle for documentation See value stream map: “Current State”
  7. 7. Kaizen EventsA Japanese word meaning gradual and orderly, continuous improvement “Blitz” event intended to improve an process within scope of process participants Participants are area experts (process operators), production insiders and outsiders, and facilitator See agenda: “Kaizen Event Compass”
  8. 8. Future StateTraditional measures: Service measures:Touches: 31% ↓ Touches: 31% ↓Cycle Time: 75% ↓ Meetings : 84% ↓Throughput: 99% ↓ Revision Cycles: 75% ↓No. of Steps: 72% ↓ Approvals: 99% ↓Distance: 99% ↓ Turn Time: 99% ↓See value stream map: “Future State”
  9. 9. Outcomes Intended improvements:  Shorten turn cycle for documentation  Better process improves accuracy Bonus improvements:  Increased sense of professional selves  Explicit support of management to insist on process  Improved relations with engineering group
  10. 10. Discussion of Results Lean thinking identifies “in the box” improvements Lateral thinking identifies “out of the box” opportunities Focus on continuous improvement: next step is content management system Return on investment is immense
  11. 11. Resources Michael L. George, Lean Six Sigma for Service: How to Use Lean Speed and Six Sigma Quality to Improve Services and Transactions. McGraw Hill, 2003. Mary Poppendieck, Tom Poppendieck, Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit for Software Development Managers, Boston, MA: Addison Wesley, 2003. James P. Womack and Daniel T. Jones, Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation, New York, NY: Free Press, Simon and Shuster, 1996.
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