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Transport  industry
 

Transport industry

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    Transport  industry Transport industry Presentation Transcript

    • Transport Industry Overview About sustainable transport system
    • Transport Driving involves controlling a vehicle, usually a motor vehicle such as a truck, bus, or automobile. For motorcycles, bicycles and animals, it is called riding. Shipping, transporting of goods and cargo, by land, sea, and air Travel, movement of people, by land, sea, and air  Transport or transportation is the movement of people, animals and goods from one location to another.  Modes of transport include air, rail, road, water, cable, pipeline and space. The field can be divided into infrastructure, vehicles and operations. Transport is important since it enables trade between people, which in turn establishes civilizations.  Transport infrastructure consists of the fixed installations necessary for transport, including roads, railways, airways, waterways, canals and pipelines and terminals such as airports, railway stations, bus stations, warehouses, trucking terminals, refueling depots (including fueling docks and fuel stations) and seaports. Terminals may be used both for interchange of passengers and cargo and for maintenance.
    • continues Elements 1 Infrastructure 2 Vehicles 3 Operation Function 1 Passenger 2 Freight  Vehicles traveling on these networks may include automobiles, bicycles, buses, trains, trucks, people, helicopters and aircraft. Operations deal with the way the vehicles are operated, and the procedures set for this purpose including financing, legalities and policies. In the transport industry, operations and ownership of infrastructure can be either public or private, depending on the country and mode.  Passenger transport may be public, where operators provide scheduled services, or private. Freight transport has become focused on containerization, although bulk transport is used for large volumes of durable items. Transport plays an important part in economic growth and globalization, but most types cause air pollution and use large amounts of land. While it is heavily subsidized by governments, good planning of transport is essential to make traffic flow and restrain urban sprawl
    • Sustainable transport  Sustainable transport refers to the broad subject of transport that is or approaches being sustainable. It includes vehicles, energy, infrastructure, roads, railways, airways, waterways, canals, pipelines, and terminals. Transport operations and logistics as well as transit-oriented development are involved. Transportation sustainability is largely being measured by transportation system effectiveness and efficiency as well as the environmental impacts of the system.[1]  Short-term activity often promotes incremental improvement in fuel efficiency and vehicle emissions controls while long-term goals include migrating transportation from fossil-based energy to other alternatives such as renewable energy and use of other renewable resources. The entire life cycle of transport systems is subject to sustainability measurement and optimization.[2]  Sustainable transport systems make a positive contribution to the environmental, social and economic sustainability of the communities they serve. Transport systems exist to provide social and economic connections, and people quickly take up the opportunities offered by increased mobility.[3] The advantages of increased mobility need to be weighed against the environmental, social and economic costs that transport systems pose
    • Impact 5 Impact 5.1 Economic 5.2 Planning 5.3 Environment  Transport systems have significant impacts on the environment, accounting for between 20% and 25% of world energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions.[4] Greenhouse gas emissions from transport are increasing at a faster rate than any other energy using sector.[5] Road transport is also a major contributor to local air pollution and smog  The social costs of transport include road crashes, air pollution, physical inactivity,[7] time taken away from the family while commuting and vulnerability to fuel price increases. Many of these negative impacts fall disproportionately on those social groups who are also least likely to own and drive cars.[8] Traffic congestion imposes economic costs by wasting people's time and by slowing the delivery of goods and services.
    • continues  Traditional transport planning aims to improve mobility, especially for vehicles, and may fail to adequately consider wider impacts. But the real purpose of transport is access - to work, education, goods and services, friends and family - and there are proven techniques to improve access while simultaneously reducing environmental and social impacts, and managing traffic congestion.[9]  the environmental impacts of transport systems include traffic congestion and automobile-oriented urban sprawl, which can consume natural habitat and agricultural lands. By reducing transportation emissions globally, it is predicted that there will be significant positive effects on Earth's air quality, acid rain, smog and climate chang  Communities which are successfully improving the sustainability of their transport networks are doing so as part of a wider programme of creating more vibrant, livable, sustainable cities.
    • Economic  Transport is a key component of growth and globalization, such as in Seattle, Washington, United States  Transport is a key necessity for specialization—allowing production and consumption of products to occur at different locations. Transport has throughout history been a spur to expansion; better transport allows more trade and a greater spread of people. Economic growth has always been dependent on increasing the capacity and rationality of transport.[26] But the infrastructure and operation of transport has a great impact on the land and is the largest drainer of energy, making transport sustainability a major issue.  Modern society dictates a physical distinction between home and work, forcing people to transport themselves to places of work or study, as well as to temporarily relocate for other daily activities. Passenger transport is also the essence of tourism, a major part of recreational transport. Commerce requires the transport of people to conduct business, either to allow face-to-face communication for important decisions or to move specialists from their regular place of work to sites where they are needed.
    • Planning  Transport planning allows for high utilization and less impact regarding new infrastructure. Using models of transport forecasting, planners are able to predict future transport patterns. On the operative level, logistics allows owners of cargo to plan transport as part of the supply chain. Transport as a field is studied through transport economics, the backbone for the creation of regulation policy by authorities. Transport engineering, a sub- discipline of civil engineering, and must take into account trip generation, trip distribution, mode choice and route assignment, while the operative level is handled through traffic engineering.  The engineering of this roundabout in Bristol, United Kingdom, attempts to make traffic flow free-moving
    • Environment  Transport is a major use of energy and burns most of the world's petroleum. This creates air pollution, including nitrous oxides and particulates, and is a significant contributor to global warming through emission of carbon dioxide,[27] for which transport is the fastest-growing emission sector.[28] By subsector, road transport is the largest contributor to global warming.[29] Environmental regulations in developed countries have reduced individual vehicles' emissions; however, this has been offset by increases in the numbers of vehicles and in the use of each vehicle.[27] Some pathways to reduce the carbon emissions of road vehicles considerably have been studied.[30][31] Energy use and emissions vary largely between modes, causing environmentalists to call for a transition from air and road to rail and human-powered transport, as well as increased transport electrification and energy efficiency.  Traffic congestion persists in São Paulo, Brazil despite the no- drive days based on license numbers.
    • Sustainable transport Includes Carbon neutral fuel Electric vehicle Green vehicle Plug-in hybrid Road traffic safety  Sustainable transport refers to the broad subject of transport that is or approaches being sustainable. It includes vehicles, energy, infrastructure, roads, railways, airways, waterways, canals, pipelines, and terminals. Transport operations and logistics as well as transit-oriented development are involved. Transportation sustainability is largely being measured by transportation system effectiveness and efficiency as well as the environmental impacts of the system.[1]  Short-term activity often promotes incremental improvement in fuel efficiency and vehicle emissions controls while long- term goals include migrating transportation from fossil-based energy to other alternatives such as renewable energy and use of other renewable resources. The entire life cycle of transport systems is subject to sustainability measurement and optimization.[2]
    • continues Aspects of sustainable transport: Transportation demand management  Sustainable transport systems make a positive contribution to the environmental, social and economic sustainability of the communities they serve. Transport systems exist to provide social and economic connections, and people quickly take up the opportunities offered by increased mobility.[3] The advantages of increased mobility need to be weighed against the environmental, social and economic costs that transport systems pose  The term sustainable transport came into use as a logical follow-on from sustainable development, and is used to describe modes of transport, and systems of transport planning, which are consistent with wider concerns of sustainability. There are many definitions of the sustainable transport, and of the related terms sustainable transportation and sustainable mobility.[10] One such definition, from the European Union Council of Ministers of Transport, defines a sustainable transportation system as one that:
    • continues  Allows the basic access and development needs of individuals, companies and society to be met safely and in a manner consistent with human and ecosystem health, and promotes equity within and between successive generations.  Is Affordable, operates fairly and efficiently, offers a choice of transport mode, and supports a competitive economy, as well as balanced regional development.  Limits emissions and waste within the planet’s ability to absorb them, uses renewable resources at or below their rates of generation, and uses non-renewable resources at or below the rates of development of renewable substitutes, while minimizing the impact on the use of land and the generation of noise.  Sustainability extends beyond just the operating efficiency and emissions. A Life-cycle assessment involves production and post- use considerations. A cradle-to-cradle design is more important than a focus on a single factor such as energy efficiency
    • continues  Environmentally sustainable transport  Transport and social sustainability  Cities and sustainable transport  Sustainable transport policies and governance  Sustainable transport toolbox
    • Sustainable transport toolbox Clean fuels and vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Sailing ships Biodiesel Biogas/CNG Electric Vehicles LPG Hydrogen vehicle Human-powered transport Animal-powered transport Sustainable (green) transport infrastructure greenways and foreshoreways Bikeways Busways Railways Access restrictions Access management / Enforcement Car Restricted Zones /Living Streets Multifunctional areas Parking Management Pedestrian zone Traffic calming / Speed reduction
    • Sustainable transport toolbox Integrated pricing strategies Congestion pricing Integrated ticketing Parking Management Collective passenger transport Public transport Bus services Rail transport Intermodal transfers Integrated ticketing Marketing Park & Ride Demand responsive transport Accessible transport systems Paratransit Bus rapid transit Quality of service Security, including Transit police Travel information Public transport timetable journey planner Less car intensive lifestyle Car pooling Car sharing Car/ driver licence exit strategies Cycling Bike sharing
    • Sustainable transport toolbox Soft measures Travel plan Walking school bus Travel blending Personalised travel plan Transport management Transportation demand management Transit oriented development Walkability New urbanism and New pedestrianism TDM Toolbox Sustainable Freight Transport Clean vehicles / clean fleet Intermodal freight transport Dry port Fleet management Route planning Transportation management system
    • Transportation demand management  Transportation demand management, traffic demand management or travel demand management (all TDM) is the application of strategies and policies to reduce travel demand (specifically that of single-occupancy private vehicles), or to redistribute this demand in space or in time.[1][2]  In transport as in any network, managing demand can be a cost-effective alternative to increasing capacity. A demand management approach to transport also has the potential to deliver better environmental outcomes, improved public health, stronger communities, and more prosperous and livable cities. TDM techniques link with and support community movements for sustainable transport.
    • continues That demand for travel needs to be managed by:  Expanding the supply and availability of (more sustainable) alternatives;  Controlling demand for the use unsustainable modes;  Providing incentives and rewards for undertaking sustainable travel habits; and  Imposing full-cost pricing on the use of the automobile.
    • Demand management toolbox  Transportation management associations: leverage public and private funds to increase the use of ridesharing and other commuting options that reduce traffic congestion and improve air quality Including or improving pedestrian-oriented design elements, such as short pedestrian crossings, wide sidewalks and street trees.  Requiring users of parking to pay the costs directly, as opposed to sharing the costs indirectly with others through increased rents and tax subsidies. Including and improving public transportation infrastructure, such as subway entrances, bus stops and routes.  Subsidizing transit costs for employees or residents.
    • continues  Bicycle-friendly facilities and environments, including secure bike storage areas and showers. See Bicycle transportation engineering  Providing active transportation (AT) facilities including bike lanes and multi-use trails.  Providing traveler information tools, including intelligent transportation system improvements, mobile and social applications, wayfinding tools, and other methods for promoting non-SOV modes  Flex-time work schedules with employers to reduce congestion at peak times Road pricing tolls during peak hours.
    • continues  Road space rationing by restricting travel based on license plate number, at certain times and places. Workplace travel plans  Roadspace reallocation, aiming to re-balance provision between private cars which often predominate due to high spatial allocations for roadside parking, and for sustainable modes.  Time, distance and place (TDP) road pricing, where road users are charged based on when, where and how much they drive. Some transportation experts believe TDP pricing is an integral part of the next generation in transportation demand management
    • Award-winning transport system  Sustainable transport systems go hand in hand with low emissions development and livable cities. Mexico City’s success has proven that developing cities can achieve this, and we expect many Asian cities to follow suit, ” says Sophie Punte, Executive Director of Clear Air Asia.  International committee of transportation and development experts, awarded Mexico City the 2013 Sustainable Transport Award for its Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system, cycling and walking infrastructure, parking program, and revitalization of public space. –  Bremen, Germany for sophisticated car sharing and non-motorized transport programs, leading to 60 percent of trips being made by cycling or walking. The honorable mention award was accepted by Michael Goltz-Richter, Senior Project Manager,  Lviv, Ukraine for overall improvements to public transport, walking, cycling, and traffic calming for the EURO2012 soccer championship. The honorable mention award was accepted by journalist and activist Myroslava Gongadze -
    •  • Lviv, Ukraine for overall improvements to public transport, walking, cycling, and traffic calming for the EURO2012 soccer championship. The honorable mention award was accepted by journalist and activist Myroslava Gongadze –  Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for the launch of Rio’s first world- class BRT corridor, Transoeste, and expansion of cycle sharing. The honorable mention award was accepted Joaquim Monteiro de Carvalho, Under Secretary of Transport. - See more at:  The award-winning transport system in Guangzhou, in south China's Guangdong province, includes not only Bus Rapid Transit but wide, tree-lined bicycle lanes and a tie-in to the large city's rail network.
    • The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) Committee includes  The most respected experts and organizations working internationally on sustainable transportation. The Committee includes: -  Institute for Transportation and Development Policy • EMBARQ, The World Resources Institute Center for Sustainable Transport • GIZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit) • Clean Air Asia • Clean Air Institute • United Nations Centre for Regional Development (UNCRD) • Transport Research Laboratory • EcoMobility, Local Governments for Sustainability (ICLEI) • Transport Research Board’s Transportation in the Developing Countries Committee (ABE90) - See more at: http://www.itdp.org/news/mexico-city-wins-2013-sustainable- transport-award#sthash.ZosbapQ7.dpuf