Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Getting smart-about-smart-energy3904

501

Published on

Getting Smart About Smart Energy …

Getting Smart About Smart Energy
by Robert Cormia on Jan 07, 2010
Getting Smart About Smart Energy

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
501
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
102
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Getting Smart About Smart Energy Robert D. Cormia Foothill College
  • 2. Agenda – Learning Goals • Smart energy paradigm • What problem are we solving? • Benefits of smart energy • Smart grid architecture • Integrating renewables • EV charging infrastructure The right energy at the right time!
  • 3. What is Smart Energy? • Robust transmission / distribution grid (T&D) • Omnidirectional communications • AMI, DR, and energy informatics / analytics • Integrating renewables • EV charging networks • New business models - electronomics
  • 4. Smart Energy Defined • Integrating key technologies – Power grid / distribution – Power generation (RE) – Power systems & AMI – Transportation systems – Telecommunications (HAN) – Information Technology (IT) • A Smart Grid transforms the way power is delivered, consumed and accounted for. Adding intelligence throughout the newly networked grid increases reliability and power quality; improves responsiveness; increases efficiency; handles current and future demand; potentially reduces costs for the provider and consumer; and provides the communication platform for new applications (The Smart Grid in 2010 – Green Tech Media Research)
  • 5. ‘Right Sourcing’ Energy • Smart energy vs. smart grid • Bringing renewables into the mix • Storing energy for transient release • Metering for time of use (TOU) transactions – Demand Response (DR) Virtual Power (VPP) • Smart EV charging infrastructure The right energy at the right time!
  • 6. Smart Energy Paradigm Distribution Generation Storage Demand The ‘Right Energy at the Right Time’ – ‘Right Sourcing’ Generation, Distribution, and End Use of Energy
  • 7. Five Key ‘Quadrants’ • Electrical Generation • Transmission and Distribution – T&D • Energy Storage (battery, hydro, fuel cell) • Electrical Load (demand / management) • Management (sensors and analytics)
  • 8. Generation Types • Fossil – coal and natural gas • Nuclear – base load • Hydro – clean and affordable • Wind – clean but intermittent • Solar – peak shaving • Geothermal – steam energy
  • 9. Grid Overview (T&D) • Generation • Transmission • Distribution • High voltage / AC • Substations
  • 10. Grid Definitions The electric grid delivers electricity from points of generation to consumers, and the electricity delivery network functions via two primary systems: the transmission system and the distribution system. The transmission system delivers electricity from power plants to distribution substations, while the distribution system delivers electricity from distribution substations to consumers. The grid also encompasses myriads of local area networks that use distributed energy resources to serve local loads and/or to meet specific application requirements for remote power, village or district power, premium power, and critical loads protection. http://www.oe.energy.gov/smartgrid.htm
  • 11. Traditional Power Grid
  • 12. GHG Emissions by Source http://eia.doe.gov/
  • 13. Electrical Grid Networks An electric grid is a network of synchronized power providers and consumers that are connected by transmission and distribution lines and operated by one or more control centers. When most people talk about the power "grid," they're referring to the transmission system for electricity. The continental United States does not have a national grid. Instead, there are three grids: the Eastern Interconnect, the Western Interconnect and the Texas Interconnect. In Alaska and Hawaii, several smaller systems interconnect parts of each state. http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/electric-grid.html
  • 14. Demand (Load) • Voltage drops / current demand • Distribution networks • Appliances plug loads • EV charging • ESP – Energy Service Providers • Storage (systems)
  • 15. Power Management • Management is everything! • Monitoring loads over time • Using predictive analytics • Storing energy for timely distribution • Holding load back (load shifting) • Coordinating load uptake (renewables)
  • 16. Why Smart Energy? • Our system is ‘load driven’ • One way communication • Load isn’t ‘managed’ • ‘Right sourcing’ energy • Power grid needs to act like an intelligent system
  • 17. Smart Energy and Smart Grid • Right sourcing energy • Microgrids (transitional link between smart grid and smart energy) • Smart grid merges Internet technology and power systems mgmt / distribution • Maximizing integration of renewables • Matching generation with demand
  • 18. Transportation • Transition to EV/PHEV • Load is significant • Need smart charging infrastructure • Connected to storage • Integrated billing systems • Microgrid solutions?
  • 19. A plug-in hybrid or full electric EV looks like an entire house to the utility. The majority of electric vehicles will need to draw power at about the same time of day. Need to coordinate EV charging through two-way Internet communications, including transfer of ‘stored power’ EVs use half to a quarter of the BTUs per mile compared to ICE (gasoline), and GHG emissions can be significantly lower if RE is used.
  • 20. Wind Power – Real Power
  • 21. Why Wind is the Answer to EV • One motor winds up – another unwinds • 1MW of wind supports 1,000 EV cars • See the math (appendix 1) • Need to ‘forward store’ wind energy for later EV charging (like email distribution) • Predictive analytics, grid-scale storage, collaborative EV charging networks are key
  • 22. Vanadium redox flow cells Store excess power for later use!
  • 23. Storage of Renewables • Grid storage • Local storage • EV storage • Batteries • Flow cells • Tiered storage
  • 24. Smart Metering – Time of Use (TOU) • This is the impetus for energy analytics • Smart metering is great for the utility • Bill 15 minute intervals – dynamic pricing • Building must have ‘smarts’ to respond to price signals, and manage demand (EMS) • TOU can be a method to send price signals – buildings need a ‘response plan’
  • 25. Monitoring Everything
  • 26. Smart Energy Metering • Smart grid • Smart metering • EMS/BMS • HAN automation • Electrical efficiency • Smart energy Home Area Networks (HAN) and residential Energy Management Systems (EMS)
  • 27. AMI/EMS/BMS/HAN
  • 28. Smart Energy Begins at Home!
  • 29. Network Architecture Power Infrastructure • Distribution network • Metering network • Communications systems • Storage systems • Wireless networks / HAN • Data centers / management • Building systems / BMS
  • 30. Network Architecture
  • 31. Energy NOC - Data Centers http://www.enernoc.com/index.php
  • 32. Internet Technologies • Sensor integration • Phasor networks • Wireless protocols • Embedded systems • Grid management Integrated communication - sensor networks powered by Internet Technology
  • 33. IntelliGrid™ - Smart Grid http://intelligrid.epri.com/
  • 34. ZigBee Specification ZigBee is a specification for a suite of high level communication protocols using small, low-power digital radios based on the IEEE 802.15.4-2003 standard for wireless personal area networks (WPANs), such as wireless headphones connecting with cell phones via short-range radio. The technology defined by the ZigBee specification is intended to be simpler and less expensive than other WPANs, such as Bluetooth. ZigBee is targeted at radio-frequency (RF) applications that require a low data rate, long battery life, and secure networking. The ZigBee Alliance is a group of companies that maintain and publish the ZigBee standard.
  • 35. Smart Grid / Micro Grid Distributed generation (localized) in micro grids and part of a larger smart grid
  • 36. Smart Home Micro Grid Cornell Microgrid - Instead of relying solely on large power plants, a portion of the nation's electricity needs could be met by small generators such as ordinary reciprocating engines, microturbines, fuel cells, and photovoltaic systems. A small network of these generators, each of which typically produce no more than 500 kilowatts, would provide reliable power to anything from a postal sorting facility to a neighborhood.
  • 37. Electronomics Cover design for the new book by Jesse Berst, Electronomics: How the Electricity Economy Will Create Wealth & Prosperity
  • 38. http://www.cpowered.com/services.php Demand Response Process
  • 39. Demand Response • Virtual Power Plant (VPP) • Aggregate response • Sustained ‘load shed’ ~ 30 minutes • Reduces peak power demand • Monthly revenue and ‘per event’ http://drrc.lbl.gov/newsletter/4-07/4CERTS.html
  • 40. Smart Energy Ecosystem
  • 41. Players • Utilities (T&D) • Networking giants • HAN vendors • Analytics firms • Power systems • EMS/BMS solutions • Storage vendors • EV charging networks
  • 42. Consortia and Markets • IntelliGrid • GridWise alliance • Smart Energy Alliance • PNNL • Galvin Institute • ZigBee • IEEE
  • 43. Timeline / Deployment* • 2005 – 2015 => Roof top solar • 2008 – 2015 => Demand response • 2009 – 2015 => Smart metering • 2010 – 2015 => Residential EMS/BMS • 2011 – 2016 => EV charging networks • 2012 – 2017 => Microgrid prototypes (US) • 2013 – 2018 => Smart grid / SCADA • 2014 – 2019 => Phasor network build-out • 2015 – 2020 => Grid scale storage • 2010 – 2030 => Renewables, T&D, EVs *Approximate time frames for bracketing the ‘hype curve’ and building momentum
  • 44. Skills & Opportunities • Power systems knowledge • Wireless networking • Home Area Networking (HAN) • Embedded (device) systems • EMS/BMS implementation • Electrical efficiency • Energy informatics
  • 45. A Subsystems Approach • Renewable energy • Distribution systems • Smart energy • Energy efficiency • LEED / green building • Electric vehicles • Alternative fuels • Batteries / fuel cells • Urban planning • GHG sequestration Smart energy Smart cities Smart citizens Smart policy
  • 46. Vision the Electron Economy
  • 47. Summary • Smart energy is pivotal to a new energy economy – meeting resource / GHG goals • Infrastructure will be complex (to build) • Three tiers of smart grid rollout: – Generation and transmission – Distribution and storage – Buildings and microgrids • EMS/BMS/HAN is a great ‘services layer’
  • 48. Where to Learn More • DOE smart grid -http://www.oe.energy.gov/smartgrid.htm • Global Smart Energy - http://www.globalsmartenergy.com/ • Apollo Alliance - http://www.apolloalliance.org/ • PG&E Pacific Energy Center- http://www.pge.com/pec/ • Our Solar Power Future – http://www.sandia.gov/pv/docs/PDF/PV_Road_Map.pdf • Wind Energy Report – AIWA http://www.awea.org/ • EPRI IntelliGrid - http://intelligrid.epri.com/ • Worldwatch Institute - http://www.worldwatch.org/

×