112477 633631228029812016
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    112477 633631228029812016 112477 633631228029812016 Presentation Transcript

    • History of PaintingHistory of Painting 2007-20082007-2008 Art 2Art 2
    • What is Painting?What is Painting? ►PaintingPainting is the practice of applying pigmentis the practice of applying pigment suspended in a carrier (or medium) and asuspended in a carrier (or medium) and a binding agent (a glue) to a surface (support)binding agent (a glue) to a surface (support) such as paper, canvas or a wall.such as paper, canvas or a wall. ► humans have been painting for about 6humans have been painting for about 6 times as long as they have been usingtimes as long as they have been using written language.written language.
    • Painting StylesPainting Styles ►Abstract art is that does not depict objects inAbstract art is that does not depict objects in the natural world, but instead uses shapesthe natural world, but instead uses shapes and colors in a non-representational orand colors in a non-representational or subjective way.subjective way. ►early 20th centuryearly 20th century  Cubist and Futurist artCubist and Futurist art  that depicts real forms in a simplified or ratherthat depicts real forms in a simplified or rather reduced way - keeping only an allusion of thereduced way - keeping only an allusion of the original natural subject.original natural subject.
    • AbstractAbstract ►art that does not depict objects in theart that does not depict objects in the natural world, but instead uses shapes andnatural world, but instead uses shapes and colors in a non-representational orcolors in a non-representational or subjective waysubjective way ►Started really in 1870s, became popular inStarted really in 1870s, became popular in early 20early 20thth centurycentury ►KandinskyKandinsky ►Expressionism also included in thisExpressionism also included in this ►Van GoghVan Gogh
    • Kandinsky,Kandinsky, Composition VIIIComposition VIII
    • Van Gogh,Van Gogh, Night CafeNight Cafe
    • BaroqueBaroque ►exaggerated motion and clear, easilyexaggerated motion and clear, easily interpreted detail to produce tension,interpreted detail to produce tension, exuberance, and grandeur from painting.exuberance, and grandeur from painting. The style started aroundThe style started around 16001600 in Rome,in Rome, Italy and spread to most of Europe.Italy and spread to most of Europe. ►CaravaggioCaravaggio ►It employed an iconography that was direct,It employed an iconography that was direct, simple, obvious, and dramaticsimple, obvious, and dramatic
    • Caravaggio,Caravaggio, Supper at EmmausSupper at Emmaus
    • CubismCubism ►avant-garde art movement thatavant-garde art movement that revolutionized European painting andrevolutionized European painting and sculpture in the early 20th century.sculpture in the early 20th century. ►objects are broken up, analyzed, andobjects are broken up, analyzed, and reassembled in an abstracted form the artistreassembled in an abstracted form the artist divides them into multiple facets, so severaldivides them into multiple facets, so several different aspects, of the objects are seendifferent aspects, of the objects are seen simultaneously. (usually overlapping)simultaneously. (usually overlapping) ►Picasso, BraquePicasso, Braque
    • Picasso,Picasso, The OldThe Old GuitaristGuitarist
    • FauvesFauves ►Les Fauves (French for wild beasts),Les Fauves (French for wild beasts), emphasized painterly qualities, and the useemphasized painterly qualities, and the use of deep color & values its focus on light andof deep color & values its focus on light and the moment.the moment. ►simplified lines,simplified lines, ►Les Fauves paintings also feature flatLes Fauves paintings also feature flat patterns and anti-naturalism.patterns and anti-naturalism. ►Gauguin, MatisseGauguin, Matisse
    • Matisse,Matisse, MadamMadam MatisseMatisse
    • Gauguin,Gauguin, JoyousnessJoyousness
    • ImpressionismImpressionism ►19th century19th century ►visible brushstrokes, light colors, openvisible brushstrokes, light colors, open composition, emphasis on light, ordinarycomposition, emphasis on light, ordinary subject matter, and unusual visual angles.subject matter, and unusual visual angles. ►Monet, CezanneMonet, Cezanne
    • Monet,Monet, SunriseSunrise
    • CezanneCezanne
    • Op ArtOp Art ►1960s1960s ►use of optical illusions.use of optical illusions. ►Op art works are usually abstract, with manyOp art works are usually abstract, with many of the better known pieces made in onlyof the better known pieces made in only black and white. When the viewer looks atblack and white. When the viewer looks at them, the impression is given of movement,them, the impression is given of movement, flashing and vibration, or alternatively offlashing and vibration, or alternatively of swelling or warping.swelling or warping. ►Bridget RileyBridget Riley
    • Bridget RileyBridget Riley
    • PointillismPointillism ►non-primary colors are generated, not bynon-primary colors are generated, not by the mixing of pigments in the palette nor bythe mixing of pigments in the palette nor by using pigments directly, but by the visualusing pigments directly, but by the visual mixing of points of primary colors, placed inmixing of points of primary colors, placed in close proximity to each other.close proximity to each other. ►1880s1880s ►SeuratSeurat
    • Seurat,Seurat, Sunday Afternoon in ParkSunday Afternoon in Park
    • Pop ArtPop Art ►Characterized by themes and techniquesCharacterized by themes and techniques drawn from mass culturedrawn from mass culture ►widely interpreted as a reaction to the then-widely interpreted as a reaction to the then- dominant ideas of abstract expressionism.dominant ideas of abstract expressionism. ►aimed to incorporate popular as opposed toaimed to incorporate popular as opposed to elitist culture into art, and targeted a broadelitist culture into art, and targeted a broad audience.audience. ►1950s1950s ►Warhol, Lichtenstein, Johns, ThiebaudWarhol, Lichtenstein, Johns, Thiebaud
    • Jasper Johns,Jasper Johns, Three FlagsThree Flags
    • Lichtenstein,Lichtenstein, HopelessHopeless
    • Warhol and TheibaudWarhol and Theibaud
    • RealismRealism ►Realism is everyday people, doing everydayRealism is everyday people, doing everyday things in everyday life.things in everyday life. ►Mid 19Mid 19thth centurycentury ►The paintings are the excellent portrayal ofThe paintings are the excellent portrayal of the events and scenes that we see aroundthe events and scenes that we see around us.us. ►Gustave CourbetGustave Courbet
    • Courbet,Courbet, The Stone BreakersThe Stone Breakers
    • RomanticismRomanticism ►1818thth centurycentury ►stressed strong emotion, the individualstressed strong emotion, the individual imagination as a critical authority, Thereimagination as a critical authority, There was a strong element of historical andwas a strong element of historical and natural inevitability in its ideas, stressing thenatural inevitability in its ideas, stressing the importance of "nature" in art and language.importance of "nature" in art and language. ►Valued the past, old art forms usedValued the past, old art forms used ►Delacroix, GericaultDelacroix, Gericault
    • Gericault,Gericault, The Raft of MedusaThe Raft of Medusa
    • Delacroix,Delacroix, Joan of ArcJoan of Arc
    • SurrealismSurrealism ►philosophy, a cultural and artisticphilosophy, a cultural and artistic movement, and a term used to describemovement, and a term used to describe unexpected juxtapositions.unexpected juxtapositions. ►1920s1920s ►embraces idiosyncrasy, while rejecting theembraces idiosyncrasy, while rejecting the idea of an underlying madness or darknessidea of an underlying madness or darkness of the mind.of the mind. ►DaliDali
    • DaliDali
    • Media in artMedia in art ►OilOil ►WatercolorWatercolor ►TemperaTempera ►Egg TemperaEgg Tempera ►AcrylicAcrylic ►Spray PaintSpray Paint ►GouacheGouache ►FrescoFresco