MAC 196: Multiplatform Radio & Audio.
* Scripts help give shape, structure and direction* You can say what you mean to mean to say* Nothing gets left out* Gives...
* Write for the EAR not the EYE* Spoken, not written* Conversational English* Think: “How would I say this?”* Different gr...
* Sets-up your feature, interview, vox-pop* Written by the reporter/producer* Guides the listener in. Gives background or ...
Type the script and title/date itDouble line spacing and tabbed to the right (not centre)Clear font – print black on white...
*   Title (as in RCS) / Reporter / Feature Producer*   TX Date*   This is the first of the line of the script. It should g...
* Cue – scripted introduction read by presenter* Actuality – sounds from location used to illustrate* FX – Sound Effects o...
* Write a cue to introduce your vox-pop or your mixed interview…* What do you need to say?* How do you explain what’s comi...
Writing for Radio
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Writing for Radio

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Transcript of "Writing for Radio"

  1. 1. MAC 196: Multiplatform Radio & Audio.
  2. 2. * Scripts help give shape, structure and direction* You can say what you mean to mean to say* Nothing gets left out* Gives a sense of style and consistency of voice* Tells a better story
  3. 3. * Write for the EAR not the EYE* Spoken, not written* Conversational English* Think: “How would I say this?”* Different grammar* Write for one person – LISTENER not Listeners* Think about colour, language and flow* Substitute words that don’t work* ALWAYS read it outloud
  4. 4. * Sets-up your feature, interview, vox-pop* Written by the reporter/producer* Guides the listener in. Gives background or provokes curiosity…* Line 1 – grabs attention and gives the basics* Line 2 – gives more details and reveals the story* Lines 3 & 4 – leads into the story
  5. 5. Type the script and title/date itDouble line spacing and tabbed to the right (not centre)Clear font – print black on white plain paperPoint 12 – 14Use CAPITALS or underlining for stressed or keywordsUse [PHO-NET-IC] spellings for difficult wordsAdd duration e.g. 2’20”Add the “Out-cue” = last words/soundsSpell check and read out-loudBe prepared to re-write it
  6. 6. * Title (as in RCS) / Reporter / Feature Producer* TX Date* This is the first of the line of the script. It should grab the listener’s attention quickly* The second paragraph will add more detail, such as why the piece is important* And the final paragraph will introduce us to the piece and the reporter* Title/ID Number* IN: First words or sounds* OUT: Last words or sounds* DUR: How long the piece is
  7. 7. * Cue – scripted introduction read by presenter* Actuality – sounds from location used to illustrate* FX – Sound Effects or actuality (usage: FX fades)* Out-Cue – The last words or sounds on a piece* Voicer / Voice Piece – a report with narration only* Package – A report with links and clips* TX – Transmission (usage: TX: 29/11/11)* ID Number – the unique number of the audio in RCS Linker
  8. 8. * Write a cue to introduce your vox-pop or your mixed interview…* What do you need to say?* How do you explain what’s coming up?* Do you need to back announce anything?* Make the scripts AT LEAST 2 paragraphs long.

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