Agile ProjectManagement              Ch                           By Jim Highsmith                                      Pr...
Operational DefinitionsCapabilities: High level valuable product function that iscomplete.Features: Lower level valuable f...
Agile Development Life                  CycleEnvision Speculat Explore                      Adapt           ClosePhase  e...
Why create a release plan? Prioritizing features Coordinating activities Establishing cost & schedule information Keeps fo...
What’s in a release plan?A list of iterations focused on deploying value based functionsto the customer. These iterations ...
What’s the time-frame?
What’s a feature-story         card?Useful product based features written in user-centered language that ties developer go...
What’s in a feature-story            card?   The technical activities and relative time required   to:                  Do...
A feature-story card               exampleFeature 1: A investment banker (user) should beable to analyze stock XYZ.  Story...
A poem on storiesSome are   big to tackle  Others are small    Some are high risk       Others not at all           Some s...
How do you schedule     stories?            Valu  Risk      e
What’s the priority?Customers decide what are the high valuefeatures and stories!Development teams decide upon thetechnolo...
How are priorities                arranged?Foundational (must have) features        High Value Low        Risk            ...
Where are all these       priorities?They get put into                    Product backlog
What does the Product   Backlog tell us?The backlog list contains capabilities, features, &stories that helps outline info...
What now?Use the release plan material (stories, prioritizedfeatures, backlog, etc.) to evaluate scope,iterations, and cos...
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Agile Project Management - Ch7

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Summary of Chapter 7 from the Agile Project Management (Second Edition) book written by Jim Highsmith.

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
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Agile Project Management - Ch7

  1. 1. Agile ProjectManagement Ch By Jim Highsmith Presenter: Rachel Fult 7Speculate Phase Produces a release plan that directs feature goals, prioritizes the work load, and also includes enough flexibility to allow for future changes.
  2. 2. Operational DefinitionsCapabilities: High level valuable product function that iscomplete.Features: Lower level valuable functionalities made up ofdifferent small story pieces.Stories: Small separate functionalities that add up to makea feature.Iteration: Iterations are short accelerated developmentphases that increase quality assurance checking andcustomer need alignment through rapid development anddeployment.Feature based development: A visible collaborativefeature-based process plan between the product team,development engineers, and customer which describesfeatures in user-focused terms.
  3. 3. Agile Development Life CycleEnvision Speculat Explore Adapt ClosePhase  e Phase  Phase  Phase  PhaseThe speculate phase elaborates upon the information gathered andoutlined in the envision phase. Using that material in the speculatephase, the agile team produces a Release Plan
  4. 4. Why create a release plan? Prioritizing features Coordinating activities Establishing cost & schedule information Keeps focus on customer needs, business objectives, & project goals Collaboration between product team, development engineers, & customer
  5. 5. What’s in a release plan?A list of iterations focused on deploying value based functionsto the customer. These iterations are:1. Maintained on feature-story cards2. Prioritized based by on feature risk and value3. Iterations and features are compiled into a product backlog *All features, stories, and product backlog information are written in customer oriented terms*
  6. 6. What’s the time-frame?
  7. 7. What’s a feature-story card?Useful product based features written in user-centered language that ties developer goals tocustomer needs.
  8. 8. What’s in a feature-story card? The technical activities and relative time required to: Document BuildDesign Test Develop Deploy Deliver
  9. 9. A feature-story card exampleFeature 1: A investment banker (user) should beable to analyze stock XYZ. Story A: User sees a comprised investment firm list of opinions on XYZ. Story B: User can click a graph to see the performance history of XYZ. Story C: User can choose a category of breaking news link related to XYZ.*Feature 1 will take relatively twice as long asFeature 2.*Story A, B, & C are high value with low risks.
  10. 10. A poem on storiesSome are big to tackle Others are small Some are high risk Others not at all Some should come 1st Others we may not even bother The one redeeming virtue is they all offer $VALUE$
  11. 11. How do you schedule stories? Valu Risk e
  12. 12. What’s the priority?Customers decide what are the high valuefeatures and stories!Development teams decide upon thetechnological risk & related time frames forfeature-stories.Project and product managers take input fromboth sides to determine the ROI.
  13. 13. How are priorities arranged?Foundational (must have) features High Value Low Risk Moderate Value Low Risk High Value High Risk Low Value Low Risk Low Value High
  14. 14. Where are all these priorities?They get put into Product backlog
  15. 15. What does the Product Backlog tell us?The backlog list contains capabilities, features, &stories that helps outline information to considerwhen: Planning iterations Assigning feature tasks to team members
  16. 16. What now?Use the release plan material (stories, prioritizedfeatures, backlog, etc.) to evaluate scope,iterations, and cost estimates. Then move ontothe next agile phase Evaluate
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