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John Denning's presentation on the NC Core to College Grant

John Denning's presentation on the NC Core to College Grant

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  • As I get started this morning, I want to invite your interruptions, questions and dialogue. One of the reasons that I’m so enthralled with the art and science of teaching and learning is because it’s such an ongoing, challenging complex set of issues to navigate. And for me – that journey – is a social process, one done better together as a group. And so as I embark on this journey of sharing some thoughts with you - and we have a collection conversation – my hope is that it’s not just what William Butler Yeats called “the filling of a pail”, but rather – this is just the start, the spark or “lighting of the fire” so to speak about a much larger conversation.
  • 62% will be some college, associates degree, BA or graduate degree. It’s not only about preparing students for jobs or restoring our place as first in the world… We need Americans who are prepared for informed, effective participation in democratic life. We need educated Americans with the capacity to solve the most pressing problems of our time.
  • Power Teaching and Learning Looks Like This:   CURRICULUM Students identify problems – in their own lives, in their communities, and in the world – and design projects mapped to state and national standards across disciplines. Students synthesize relevant knowledge and skills from their cumulative experience to design and communicate thoughtful solutions to increasingly sophisticated, authentic problems . In themed schools, authentic problems relate to school theme. Students design and lead a wide range of co-curricular learning opportunities that support college and work readiness, service learning and school theme (if applicable).   INSTRUCTION Students create their own learning plans with guidance and support from the teacher. Students help each other use technology to learn content, think critically , solve problems, discern reliability, use information, communicate, innovate and collaborate . Students effectively organize and manage their own learning teams . Students help each other exercise and communicate sound reasoning, understand connections, make complex choices, and frame, analyze, and solve problems. Students clarify ideas and other students’ work during whole-class discussions and small group work. Students ask each other to justify their thinking. Students are reading, writing, thinking and talking in every classroom every day, without explicit teacher direction, to advance collective and individual understanding of core skills and concepts.   ASSESSMENT Students participate in the development of the criteria for successful demonstration of meaningful learning outcomes. Students exercise choice in determining how to demonstrate learning outcomes. Teachers and students share a comprehensive understanding of each student’s knowledge and skills. Students monitor their progress on learning outcomes and engage in multiple, varied opportunities to learn and demonstrate outcomes. Teachers and students have ongoing communication regarding progress toward learning outcomes and next steps. Students regularly report strengths and plans for continued development relative to learning outcomes to parents.
  • 62% will be some college, associates degree, BA or graduate degree. It’s not only about preparing students for jobs or restoring our place as first in the world… We need Americans who are prepared for informed, effective participation in democratic life. We need educated Americans with the capacity to solve the most pressing problems of our time.
  • 62% will be some college, associates degree, BA or graduate degree. It’s not only about preparing students for jobs or restoring our place as first in the world… We need Americans who are prepared for informed, effective participation in democratic life. We need educated Americans with the capacity to solve the most pressing problems of our time. So…how do we tackle these contexts and think about the work of LEARN NC moving forward?
  • 62% will be some college, associates degree, BA or graduate degree. It’s not only about preparing students for jobs or restoring our place as first in the world… We need Americans who are prepared for informed, effective participation in democratic life. We need educated Americans with the capacity to solve the most pressing problems of our time.
  • Power Teaching and Learning Looks Like This:   CURRICULUM Students identify problems – in their own lives, in their communities, and in the world – and design projects mapped to state and national standards across disciplines. Students synthesize relevant knowledge and skills from their cumulative experience to design and communicate thoughtful solutions to increasingly sophisticated, authentic problems . In themed schools, authentic problems relate to school theme. Students design and lead a wide range of co-curricular learning opportunities that support college and work readiness, service learning and school theme (if applicable).   INSTRUCTION Students create their own learning plans with guidance and support from the teacher. Students help each other use technology to learn content, think critically , solve problems, discern reliability, use information, communicate, innovate and collaborate . Students effectively organize and manage their own learning teams . Students help each other exercise and communicate sound reasoning, understand connections, make complex choices, and frame, analyze, and solve problems. Students clarify ideas and other students’ work during whole-class discussions and small group work. Students ask each other to justify their thinking. Students are reading, writing, thinking and talking in every classroom every day, without explicit teacher direction, to advance collective and individual understanding of core skills and concepts.   ASSESSMENT Students participate in the development of the criteria for successful demonstration of meaningful learning outcomes. Students exercise choice in determining how to demonstrate learning outcomes. Teachers and students share a comprehensive understanding of each student’s knowledge and skills. Students monitor their progress on learning outcomes and engage in multiple, varied opportunities to learn and demonstrate outcomes. Teachers and students have ongoing communication regarding progress toward learning outcomes and next steps. Students regularly report strengths and plans for continued development relative to learning outcomes to parents.
  • Let’s now turn to the future – and wonder about what this enterprising work might look like in the years ahead…
  • Power Teaching and Learning Looks Like This:   CURRICULUM Students identify problems – in their own lives, in their communities, and in the world – and design projects mapped to state and national standards across disciplines. Students synthesize relevant knowledge and skills from their cumulative experience to design and communicate thoughtful solutions to increasingly sophisticated, authentic problems . In themed schools, authentic problems relate to school theme. Students design and lead a wide range of co-curricular learning opportunities that support college and work readiness, service learning and school theme (if applicable).   INSTRUCTION Students create their own learning plans with guidance and support from the teacher. Students help each other use technology to learn content, think critically , solve problems, discern reliability, use information, communicate, innovate and collaborate . Students effectively organize and manage their own learning teams . Students help each other exercise and communicate sound reasoning, understand connections, make complex choices, and frame, analyze, and solve problems. Students clarify ideas and other students’ work during whole-class discussions and small group work. Students ask each other to justify their thinking. Students are reading, writing, thinking and talking in every classroom every day, without explicit teacher direction, to advance collective and individual understanding of core skills and concepts.   ASSESSMENT Students participate in the development of the criteria for successful demonstration of meaningful learning outcomes. Students exercise choice in determining how to demonstrate learning outcomes. Teachers and students share a comprehensive understanding of each student’s knowledge and skills. Students monitor their progress on learning outcomes and engage in multiple, varied opportunities to learn and demonstrate outcomes. Teachers and students have ongoing communication regarding progress toward learning outcomes and next steps. Students regularly report strengths and plans for continued development relative to learning outcomes to parents.
  • The President of the Ohio Univeristy System went on to say…” It is not largesse. It is not charity. And it is not a transient act—vulnerable to the ebb and flow of financial realities or the whims of individual decision makers. Plain and simple, it is our moral duty. That’s the call for today’s modern university…

NCICU Core to College Grant Presentation NCICU Core to College Grant Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • NORTH CAROLINA INDEPENDENT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES EDUCATION DEANS NOVEMBER 2, 2012 GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA DR. JOHN D. DENNING, STATE DIRECTORK-12 & POSTSECONDARY ALIGNMENT INITIATIVES
  • “Education is a social process;education is growth; education isnot a preparation for life butis life itself." -John Dewey
  • What do we want students to knowand be able to do in the 21st century?
  • 1. Evolution of Common Core2. Implementation of Common Core in NC to-date3. Overview of Core to College grant
  • THE IMPACT OF COMMON CORE Independent NCCCS UNC Colleges and UniversitiesHigh School Graduates Ready for Postsecondary Success High School Graduates Ready for Certificate andDegree Completers Certificate and Degree Completers Postsecondary Success Productive, Employed Workers and Citizens
  • 1. Evolution of Common Core
  • Technology is changing the way weteach and learn
  • Education Requirements for Jobs, 2018 Georgetown University, Center on Education and the Workforce, 2010 p. 14 http://www9.georgetown.edu/grad/gppi/hpi/cew/pdfs/FullReport.pdf
  • Common Core State Standards • Address disparity across states, equity matters • Let’s be honest: HS wasn’t preparing all of our kids • Clear, focused guideposts • Economies of scale
  • THE IMPACT OF COMMON CORE Independent NCCCS UNC Colleges and UniversitiesHigh School Graduates Ready for Postsecondary Success High School Graduates Ready for Certificate andDegree Completers Certificate and Degree Completers Postsecondary Success Productive, Employed Workers and Citizens
  • 2.Implementation of Common Core in NC to-date
  • • SBE adopted 2010 -all sectors of higher ed immediately pass resolutions of support• DPI - Massive effort -HUGE shift in thinking about instruction/professional development -Starting round 2 of READY! Mtgs -Teacher education – program approval process
  • • Implementation Matters -it’s not just words on paper – it’s about teaching and learning -raising the bar of expectations requires exemplary leadership; along with trained faculty -students deserve continued rigor at all sectors of postsecondary
  • • Assessments • NC already has assessments • But push for “next generation assessments” = PARCC and SBAC • Computer adaptive and performance based http://www.smarterbalanced.org/sample-items-and-performance-ta
  • • Higher Education Imperatives -teacher education – getting teachers into pipeline who are CCSS-ready -more than just teacher education, Arts and Sciences -continued conversations with CAOs and Deans
  • • Higher Education Imperatives Policy Issues: -defining readiness -assessments -placement
  • Your turn: What have you done on your campus to foster a conversation about the impact of the new Common Core State Standards?
  • 3. Overview of Core to College Grant
  • • Core to College Grant • 1 of only 10 states • Gates, Lumina, Hewlett, RPA Foundations • All of a state’s education sectors to work hand in hand • Be a driver for college and career readiness
  • “They [college and universities]… must reach out as never before to fully understand the needs in our communities and to fully address them—as partners, together. That is the model of higher education in this new 21st century.” (Gee, 2010)Opportunity and Purpose: Outreach’s Changing Mission, Journal ofHigher Education Outreach and Engagement, Volume 14, Number 3,p. 5, (2010)
  • North Carolina’s Core to College Grant GOALS:1.Increase educators’ (K-12 and all levels of postsecondary), parents’and others’ understandings of the Common Core State Standardsand how they are to be implemented and impactful on the state ofNorth Carolina.2.Create meaningful alignment between K-12 and postsecondarystandards, assessments and expectations for student success.3.Adopt a set of policy recommendations supporting a commondefinition of career and college readiness.
  • North Carolina’s Core to College Grant GOALS:1.Increase understanding:  Website and set of communication tools  Variety of convenings across the state (CC, UNC, privates and K-12)  Leadership Forums  What does all of this mean for me in higher ed?
  • North Carolina’s Core to College Grant GOALS:2.Policy alignment:  Establishing communication channels  Use of new assessments  Supporting programs for access, CAA  Alignment Teams  Impact on teaching and learning for higher ed faculty  Teacher development/professional development/creation of resources
  • North Carolina’s Core to College Grant GOALS:3.Common readiness definition:  Documenting various determinants in use currently  Working toward consensus  Goal is a coherent and consistent system across the state  Ultimate goal here isn’t rhetoric – but increased opportunities for success post high school
  • In the 21st century, a variety of skills are important…
  • Questions?
  • Follow Up Tasks  Talking Points about alignment efforts  Updates from planning for convenings  Launch of website - repository for updates & information  Invitations to future convenings
  • FOR MORE INFORMATION John D. Denning, Ed.D.State Director, K-12 and Postsecondary Alignment 919.807.7099 DenningJ@NCCommunityColleges.edu