Balance, emphasis, etc
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Balance, emphasis, etc

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  • Balance: The distribution of visual weight within a composition
  • With balance, we expect a vertical axis with equal distribution…BUTThere can be a place for purposeful imbalance…can raise uneasiness within the viewer.
  • Vertical imbalance…the city overpowers the sky. The city appears to fill the entire composition…seems looming.
  • Symmetrical Balance: repeated elements on both sides of the axis…also called Bilateral Symmetry…MIRROR IMAGE. -Static balance -Formal balance -Feeling of permanence, strength, stability -Order -Present in government buildings, churches
  • Symmetrical Balance is rare in photography and painting, unlike architecture.Symmetrical Compositions  Immediate creation and emphasis of a focal point.
  • Approximate Symmetry…slight differences on either side of the axis
  • Radial Balance…mirror image on all axes
  • Spirograph! String art! Doily!
  • Asymmetrical Balance: Balance is achieved with dissimilar objects that have equal visual weight or equal eye attraction.Informal balance: More casual approach; appears less planned (though is untrue)… -Involves more complex considerations and more subtle factors.
  • Asymmetrical Balance by Value: Dissimilar value areas are equally interesting to the eye -A darker, smaller element is visually equal to a lighter, larger one.
  • -A darker, smaller element is visually equal to a lighter, larger one.
  • Asymmetrical Balance by Color: A smaller amount of one color can balance a larger area of another color
  • Asymmetrical Balance by Color: A smaller amount of one color can balance a larger area of another color
  • Asymmetrical Balance by Color: A smaller amount of one color can balance a larger area of another color
  • Asymmetrical Balance by Shape…a small, complicated shape is balanced by a larger, more stable shape.
  • Asymmetrical Balance by Shape…a small, complicated shape is balanced by a larger, more stable shape.The curvilinear shape of the chair is balanced by the many rectilinear shapes of the window sills.
  • Asymmetrical Balance by Texture/Pattern…Large areas of pattern are balanced by smaller areas of flat, smooth texture.
  • Asymmetrical Balance by Texture/Pattern…Large areas with no pattern are balanced by smaller areas of decorative pattern.
  • Asymmetrical Balance by Texture/Pattern…Large areas with no pattern are balanced by smaller areas of decorative pattern.
  • Asymmetry by Position & Eye Direction: A large shape placed near the middle of a design can be balanced by a smaller shape placed toward the outer edge.
  • Asymmetry by Position & Eye Direction: A large shape placed near the middle of a design can be balanced by a smaller shape placed toward the outer edge.
  • Asymmetry by Position & Eye Direction: A large shape placed near the middle of a design can be balanced by a smaller shape placed toward the outer edge.
  • Asymmetry by Position & Eye Direction: A large shape placed near the middle of a design can be balanced by a smaller shape placed toward the outer edge…connected by eye direction between Mary and Gabriel
  • Focal point: A point of emphasis that can attract attention and encourage the viewer to look closer. -Here the turtle is emphasized by the contrast of color and size, as well as its isolation…actual and implied lines also direct us to it. -Several focal points can turn the design into a “3-ring circus”, leaving the viewer in confusion…WHERE EVERYTHING IS EMPHASIZED, NOTHING IS EMPHASIZED.
  • Emphasis by Contrast: as a rule, focal point results when one element differs from the others. Whatever interrupts an overall feeling or pattern automatically attracts the eye by this difference. -Here, composition is dominated by distorted, expressionistic faces. His realistic self-portrait differs in its execution
  • Emphasis by Isolation: Simply by being set off by itself, it grabs our attention. This is contrast, of course, by it is contrast by placement, not form. -The doctor and the foreground figures contrast by value from the background figures, but their isolation in the composition’s corner gives extra emphasis to the doctor.
  • Emphasis by Placement: If many elements point to one direction, our eye will be directed there. -A focal point, however strong, should remain related to and a part of the overall design.
  • Scale: Size…however, size is relative.Proportion: Refers to relative size…measured against other elements or against some mental norm or standard.
  • Scale and proportion are closely tied to emphasis and focal point.Hieratic Scaling: Visual scale was often related to thematic importance
  • Power of Unusual Scale
  • 25’ 7” wide fresco in San Marco, Florence.Piece relies on balance, geometry and order…figures are small in relation to the overall size of the fresco…….FEELING OF QUIET CALM AND ORDER.
  • 2’ x 3.5’Figures are crammed together, overlap in a constricting manner…feels CLAUSTROPHOBIC AND CROWDED.Focuses on the intense emotions of the event.
  • Unexpected or Exaggerated Scale:Some artists use scale changes intentionally to intrigue or mystify rather than to clarify the focal point. -Adult figures reduced in scale, children are closer to actual scale.
  • Proportion linked to ratioThe Greeks sought to discover ideal proportions, especially in mathematical ratios. The Golden Rectangle influenced art and design throughout centuries…found in growth patterns in nature. -Ratio of the Golden Rectangle called The Golden Mean (w:1 as 1:1 +w) -Found in the Fibonacci sequence
  • Rhythm: Based on repetition…involves a clear repetition of elements that are the same or only slightly modified.
  • Legato (connecting & flowing) vs. Stacatto (abrupt)

Balance, emphasis, etc Balance, emphasis, etc Presentation Transcript

  • Balance, Emphasis, etc.
  • Henri Riviere. Funeral UnderUmbrellas. 1895.
  • Wayne Thiebaud
  • Wayne Thiebaud
  • Rose Window. Cathedral of St. John the Divine
  • Christo. Running FenceDrawing. 1973
  • Edvard Munch
  • RichardDiebenkorn.Ocean Park No.29.1970
  • Lucian Freud
  • Rachel Whiteread
  • Alice Neel.Lonliness1970
  • Egon Scheile. Portraitof the Painter AntonPeschka, 1909
  • Edouard Vuillard
  • Paula Rego.The Family1988
  • Andrew Wyeth. Christina’s World. 1948
  • David Hockney.Yves-Marie Asleep.1976
  • Fra Angelico.The Annunciation.1442.
  • Henri Matisse. Bathers with a Turtle.
  • James Ensor.Self-Portrait Surrounded byMasks.1899.
  • Thomas Eakins. The Agnew Clinic. 1889
  • David Hockney.A Bigger Splash.1967
  • Richard Roth. Untitled.1983
  • Fra Filippo Lippi.Saint LawrenceEnthroned with Saintsand Donors.c. Late 1440s
  • Kent Twitchell. LA Marathon Mural. 405 Freeway.
  • Changes in scale within a design change the general effect.
  • Domenico Ghirlandaio. Last Supper. c. 1480
  • Emil Nolde. The Last Supper. 1909.
  • Charles Ray. Family Romance. 1993.
  • Notions of the Ideal
  • Bridget Riley.Arrest 2.1965
  • Beatriz Milhazes