TIMD Philosophy 1
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TIMD Philosophy 1

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TIMD Philosophy 1 TIMD Philosophy 1 Presentation Transcript

  • The Need to Educate for Character © 2002 International Educational Foundation IEF is responsible for the content of this presentation only if it has not been altered from the original. © IEF 1
  • © IEF 2
  • Best of the 20th Century © IEF 3
  • Worst of the 20th Century © IEF 4
  • Family in Crisis  Spouse and child abuse  Infidelity  Divorce © IEF 5
  • Youth in Crisis  Sex  Drug s  STDs  Crim e © IEF 6
  • Strongest Influences on Students 1950 1990 1. Home 1. Peers 2. School 2. TV 3. Church 3. Home 4. Peers 5. TV 4. School 5. Church Source: Michigan State University Study, 1990 © IEF 7
  • 1940s School Problems 1990s School Problems 1. Talking out of turn 1. Drug abuse 2. Making noise 2. Alcohol abuse 3. Improper clothing 4. Littering 3. Pregnancy 4. Assault Source: William J. Bennett et al., “Index of Leading Cultural Indicators,” Empower America, Mar 1993 © IEF 8
  • U.S. Spending Up 500% Social Problems Crime — Up 500% Divorce — Up 400% Fatherles s Children — Up 300% U.S. from 1960 — 1990 Source: William J. Bennett, “Is Our Culture in Decline?” Education Week, April 1993 © IEF 9
  • “The greater our material power, the greater our need for spiritual insight and virtue ...” Source: Arnold Toynbee, British Historian, Civilization on Trial © IEF 10
  • Two Dimensions of a Human Being Mind Body © IEF 11
  • Two Dimensions of Value  Truth Mind  Beauty  Goodness Inner Satisfaction  Love Happiness  Food Body  Shelter  Wealth  Comfort Physical Well-being © IEF 12
  • Two Dimensions of Education  Truth  Beauty  Goodness  Love Education for Character  Food  Shelter  Wealth  Comfort Education for Career © IEF 13
  • Priority of Educating for Character Mind Education for Character Body Education for Career © IEF 14
  • Traditional Role of Education  Passing on knowledge & cultural values  Teaching moral standards and social responsibilities  Preparing good citizens © IEF 15
  • 1960s— Breakdown of Traditional Values Adult Authority Individualism & Moral Relativism © IEF 16
  • “Values-Neutral” Perspective  Pluralism as moral equivalence  Decline of religion  Distrust of authority  © IEF 17
  • Characteristics of Values Clarification  Values neutral  Feelings and process  Student choice © IEF 18
  • Characteristics of Values Clarification  Teacher as facilitator  Ignores traditional morality  Discounts parents’ role © IEF 19
  • Early Appeal of Values Clarification  Interactive  Treats students as individuals © IEF 20
  • Interactive Methodology  Participatory  Students as agents of own learning  Effective within moral framework © IEF 21
  • Limitations of Values Clarification  No moral standards  Encourages mediocrity  Not characterbuilding © IEF 22
  • Why Moral Education Went Astray Dubious assumptions  “Values – neutrality” as norm  Pluralism precludes universal values  Values = religion © IEF 23
  • Character Education — Rising Trend U.S. federal funding for character education © IEF 24
  • Character Education Based on Universal Values Spiritual Contemporary EasternUniversalWestern Values TraditionaMaterial l © IEF 25
  • Universal Values Criteria  Reversible  Generalizable  Compelling to the conscience © IEF 26
  • Universal Values Criteria  Objective benefits  Transcend cultures  Embodied as virtues © IEF 27
  • Common to All Cultures © IEF 28
  • “Education has had two great goals: To help young people to become smart and … Source:become good.” Thomas Lickona, Educating for Character © IEF 29
  • Moral Goals of Education 1. Mature character 2. Loving relationships & family 3. Contribution to society © IEF 30
  • Good Character Disposition to right conduct  Attitudes & habits  For loving well © IEF 31
  • Different Personalities United in Character © IEF 32
  • Heart — Core of Character True Lov e Heart Character © IEF 33
  • Cultivation of the Heart  Experiences of love  Moral examples  Practice of caring © IEF 34
  • Moral Goal — Mature Character  Loving heart  Self-control  Lives for others  Words = Deeds © IEF 35
  • First Dimension of Education Cultivation of the Heart Mature Character © IEF 36
  • Education in Norms  Training in proper behavior  Rules and responsibilities  For respect & harmony © IEF 37
  • Education for Character — Balances Love & Rules Love Rules © IEF 38
  • Moral Goal: Loving Relationships & Family  Strong marriages  Effective parenting  Ethical practice  Living for higher purpose © IEF 39
  • Second Dimension of Education Education in Norms Loving Relationships & Family Cultivation of the Heart © IEF 40
  • Education for Mastery  Academic education  Technical education  Education in the arts © IEF 41
  • Mastery Involves Moral Standards  Business Ethics  Work Ethics  Environmental Ethics © IEF 42
  • Mastery Involves Concern for the Environment © IEF 43
  • Moral Goal — Contribution to Society  Technical achievement  Community service  Sustainable environment © IEF 44
  • Third Dimension of Education Education for Mastery Education in Norms Contributi on to society... Cultivation of the Heart © IEF 45
  • Problem of Modern Education Education for Mastery Education in Norms Cultivatio n of the Heart © IEF 46
  • Balanced Education Education for Mastery Education in Norms Cultivation of the Heart © IEF 47