TIMD-IEF Part 11
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TIMD-IEF Part 11

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  • 1.Strengthen personal integrity <br /> 2.Practice filial piety <br /> 3.Cultivate respect and appreciation for the opposite sex <br /> 4.Practice being a true friend <br /> 5.Deepen the heart through service <br /> 6.Maintain sexual purity <br />
  • 1.Clear sense of moral values <br /> 2.Living up to one’s moral convictions <br /> 3.Self-discipline and delayed gratification <br />
  • Love and honor one’s parents <br /> Cultivation of loyalty <br /> Springboard to all forms of love <br />
  • 1.Relate to them as siblings or close relatives <br /> 2.Respect gender qualities <br /> Within family and friends <br /> Show modesty in attitude and appearance <br />
  • 1.Practice loyalty, cooperation, support and honesty <br /> 2.Make friends with various people of good character <br /> Different personalities <br /> Elder and younger <br /> Male and female <br />
  • 1.Sexual compulsions <br /> 2.Poor relationships with elders and friends <br />
  • Opportunities to learn about giving and selflessness <br /> To give is to receive <br /> Love involves effort <br />
  • 1.Essential to maturity <br /> 2.Positive, practical, achievable lifestyle <br />
  • 1.Recognize how one is possibly being manipulated <br /> 2.Maintain self-respect and self-control to resist stimulation <br /> 3.Know how to handle an emotional situation <br />
  • “ If you loved me you would let me” <br /> “ I know you really want to” <br /> “ Everybody is doing it” <br /> “ If you loved me, you would not push me” <br /> “ Yes - with my future spouse” <br /> “ Not me” <br /> Moral conviction is most important <br />
  • Cultivates empathy <br /> Fosters sense of self worth <br /> Sharpens relational and parenting skills <br /> Broadens base of friendship <br />
  • Large numbers are making the commitment to save sex until marriage <br />
  • 1.Opportunity to regain a sense of self-worth <br /> 2.Best option for those disillusioned with premarital sex <br />
  • The pure relationship of love between a man and a woman is a sacred trust to be cherished and honored, for the sake of building a true family, a healthy nation, and a world of peace. <br /> Once that love is consummated, it should never be broken. <br />
  • 1.Stimulates selfishness <br /> 2. Creates possessiveness <br /> 3. Inhibits communication <br />
  • 1.If married later, greater likelihood of divorce <br /> 2.Increased conflict and poorer communication <br /> 3.Greater risk of violence to women <br /> 7 times the risk of assault by boy friends than by husbands <br /> Source: National Crime Victimization Survey, US Department of Justice, 1992 <br />
  • “Sex is most joyful and fulfilling - most emotionally safe as well as physically safe - when it occurs within a loving, total and binding commitment...[as in] marriage... the union of two person’s lives.” <br /> Source: Thomas Lickona, American Educator, Educating for Character <br />
  • Teenage children are unable to connect sex with love <br /> Jean Piaget <br /> Adolescents are unable to think in terms of the future Lawrence Kohlberg <br /> Having sex before the heart is developed leads to problems with intimacy later <br /> Victor Frankl <br />
  • Any position in life depends on meeting certain criteria <br /> The qualification for sex is maturity and marriage <br />
  • Temptation of Sexual Love <br />
  • Temptation of Sexual Love <br />
  • 1.Protection of the heart, conscience and body <br /> 2.Opportunity to develop character <br /> 3.Freedom to develop other friendships <br /> 4.Training for fidelity <br /> 5.Less chance of divorce <br />
  • 1.Greatest gift to show sincerity <br /> 2.Freedom to learn the art of loving together <br /> 3.Freedom from comparisons to past lovers <br /> 4.Less chance of divorce <br /> 5.Training for fidelity <br />
  • Romance by itself Insufficient foundation for the enduring love needed to sustain marriages and families <br />
  • 1.Psychological damage and problems for future marriage can afflict either men or women <br /> Even if disease and pregnancy are prevented <br /> Can have lifelong impact <br />
  • 1.Caring <br /> 2.Honesty <br /> 3.Trust <br /> 4.Fidelity <br /> 5.Commitment <br /> 6.Sense of sacrifice <br /> 7.Sexual satisfaction <br />
  • 7.Anxiety over possible pregnancy and disease <br /> 8.Rage over betrayal <br /> 9.Corruption ofcharacter <br /> 10.Depression and suicide <br /> Source: Thomas Lickona, “The Neglected Heart,” American Educator, 1994 <br />
  • 1.Comparison to past partners <br /> 2.Tendency towards infidelity <br /> 3.Transmission of STDs <br /> 4.Greater likelihood of divorce <br />
  • 1.Regret <br /> 2.Heartbreak <br /> 3.Guilt and shame <br /> 4.Stunted personal growth <br /> 5.Loss of self-respect <br /> 6.Fear of commitment <br /> Source: Thomas Lickona,“The Neglected Heart,” American Educator, 1994 <br />
  • Caution and wisdom needed because of the bonding power of love <br />
  • 1.Looking for love <br /> 2.Seeking acceptance <br /> From partner <br /> From peers <br /> 3.Proving one’s manhood or womanhood <br />
  • 1.Loving has purpose and direction <br /> Grounded in heart & conscience <br /> Purpose determines depth of love <br /> 2.Love is grounded in ethical standards beyond the personal relationship <br />
  • 1.Mature character Discernment and self-control <br /> 2.Constant caring investment <br /> Communication <br /> Mutual support and service <br /> Shared interests and activities <br /> Forgiveness and making amends <br /> 3.Shared ethical values <br /> Beyond mutual gratification <br /> Connected to community <br />
  • 1.Includes sexual attraction <br /> Rooted in instinctual and unconscious forces <br /> 2.Transient stage <br /> 3.Lasting intimacy, freedom and joy takes time and investment <br />

TIMD-IEF Part 11 TIMD-IEF Part 11 Presentation Transcript

  • Drug and Our Youth— Focus on Prevention © 2002 International Educational Foundation IEF is responsible for the content of this presentation only if it has not been altered from the original. © IEF 1
  • Strategies in the Fight Against Drugs 1. Law enforcement, Interdiction & Treatment  Need more resources  Poor results 2. Prevention  Needs less resources  Promising results © IEF 2
  • Conventional Reasons Why People Begin to Take Drugs  Curiosity  Peer pressure  Change mood or sensation  Pleasure  Enhance performance © IEF 3
  • Media Influence  Glamorizes drug abuse  Road to popularity and © IEF 4
  • Information About Dangers — Poor Deterrent Need to focus on root causes of drug use © IEF 5
  • Primary Reasons People Begin to Take Drugs Substitute for the fulfillment of basic life goals  Mature character  Loving relationships  Contribution to society © IEF 6
  • Choices on the Way to Maturity Desire for Maturity Mak Self-Respect Mature Character e Effo rt False Self-Esteem Tak Selfe Destruction Dru g © IEF 7
  • Risk Factors — Weak Character  Low moral standard  Disrespect for elders’ guidance  Poor selfdiscipline  Irresponsibility Susceptibility to drug abuse © IEF 8
  • Protective Factors — Strong Character  High moral standard  Respect for elders’ guidance  Self-discipline  Responsibility Power to resist drugs © IEF 9
  • Drugs Hinder Personal Growth  Disturbed emotions  Impaired intellect  Weakened will © IEF 10
  • “I thought if I gave up marijuana and drinking then everything would somehow be all right. But the reality was that I had all the same problems that I did as when I started.” Former Drug Addict © IEF 11
  • Choices on the Way to Love Desire for Contributi on Mak Healthy e Relationships Real Effo Interaction rt & Belonging Tak e Dru g False Sociabilit y & Sense Isolation & Loneliness © IEF 12
  • Drugs as a Substitute for Love © IEF 13
  • Risk Factors — Dysfunctional Family  Lack of parental love  Lack of parental discipline  Drug abuse by family members  Violence Susceptibility to © IEF 14
  • Protective Factors — Sound Family  Parental Love  Proper discipline  Drug–free family members  Harmony Power to resist drugs © IEF 15
  • Choices on the Way to Mastery Desire for Contributi on Mak e Effo rt Tak e Dru g Sense of Competence Success in Life Illusion of Competenc Loss of Control e over Life © IEF 16
  • Risk Factors — Social Deficiencies  Ineffective schools  Few career opportunities  Lack of constructive recreation Susceptibility to drug abuse © IEF 17
  • Protective Factors — Healthy Societies  Effective schools  Many career opportunities  Creative recreation Power to resist drugs © IEF 18
  • Freedom & Drug Use Be Respo nsible True Freedom & Success Take Drug s Loss of Freedom & Addiction Free Will © IEF 19
  • Natural “Highs”  Life–affirming exhilaration  Original joy desired © IEF 20
  • © IEF 21
  • © IEF 22 © IEF 22
  • Natural High  Reinforces successful behavior  Encourages growth  Enhances wellbeing Drugged High  Reinforces addictive behavior  Short-circuits growth  Deteriorates well-being © IEF 23
  • Drugs — A Moral Problem “Drug use is a misguided attempt to find the meaning of life [that gives] users a false and temporary sense of power and control. The drug problem is fundamentally a moral [one]…” William Bennett, former director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy © IEF 24
  • Balanced Education Education for Mastery Education in Norms Cultivation of the Heart © IEF 25
  • Prevention Works Reduction of Demand Promotion of Healthy Life-styles  Strong Character  Strong Families  Healthy Society © IEF 26
  • Prevention Can Succeed American 12th Graders Using Drugs In Past Years 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 1995 1992 1985 1979 0% 1975 10% © IEF 27
  • Major Psychoactive Drugs Stimulant Depressants Sharpens and accelerate functions Dull and slow Psychedelic s Alter perception © IEF 28
  • Cocain e  Illusion of well-being  Extremely addictive  Cardiac arrest or lung failure © IEF 29
  • Amphetamin es  Sense of power  Psychological dependence  Psychosis  Stroke or heart failure © IEF 30
  • Heroin  Blocks pain and gives pleasure  Extremely addictive  Coma or cardiac arrest  Needles spread AIDS © IEF 31
  • Marijua na  Impaired memory and low motivation  Lung damage  Laced with other drugs © IEF 32
  • LSD  Hallucinations  Panic, paranoia and flashback © IEF 33
  • PCP  Delusions  Violence  Temporary insanity © IEF 34
  • Inhalant s  Cause exhilaration  Poisonous  Common among young adolescents © IEF 35
  • Gateway Drugs and Youth  Alcohol  Tobacco  Marijua na  Heroin  Cocain e  PCP © IEF 36
  • Tobacc o  Addictive  Kills three million annually worldwide Source: World Health Organization  Lung and heart disease © IEF 37
  • Alcohol Abuse  Impairs judgement and coordination  Lowers inhibitions  Causes birth defects and liver damage © IEF 38
  • Current U.S. Drug Use 12.6 million illicit drug users  10 million marijuana users  2.1 million lifetime heroin users Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1994 © IEF 39
  • Drug Abuse Among U.S. Children Doubled among 12-17 year olds, 1992-95 Source: 1994, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services © IEF 40
  • China’s Drug Problem 380,00 drug addicts in 1995  Almost 30 tons of illicit drugs seized between 19911995 Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1994 Projected to have the world’s largest number of addicts by 1998  Heroin is increasingly popular in major cities © IEF 41 © IEF 41
  • Process of Physical and Emotional Dependence Addiction  Withdrawal painful Habit & Tolerance  More needed for same effect Casual Use Experimentat ion © IEF 42
  • General Signs of Drug Abuse  Absenteeism & poor performance  Change on eating or sleeping  Hostility  Self-destructive behavior  Depression © IEF 43
  • Denia l  Defense mechanism  to avoid recognizing damage  Moves from conscious to unconscious © IEF 44
  • “After you take ‘crack’ [cocaine] for a while, you don’t want to stop until all the money is gone, until you have no choice.” ‘Crack’ cocaine user © IEF 45
  • Withdrawal Symptoms Physical Psychologica l  Convulsion s  Vomiting  Paranoia  Cramps  Depression  Pain  Flashbacks  Delirium © IEF 46
  • Drug Abuse — Never a Private Matter For every addict  Many individuals suffer  Society pays © IEF 47
  • Stunting of Personal Development  Avoid dealing with life issues  No incentive to develop character © IEF 48
  • Drugs — Destructive to Learning  Impair learning and development  Tied to school drop–out rates © IEF 49
  • Domestic Violence and Substance Abuse 50% of all spousal abuse linked to intoxicants © IEF 50
  • Stunting of Personal Development  Exploitative relationships  Tendency to isolation © IEF 51
  • Injecting Drugs Spread HIV Infection 70% of all New York heroin addicts test positive for the HIV virus © IEF 52
  • “This woman was pregnant, she was prostituting, was HIV positive and had a $250-a-day habit.” AIDS Patient © IEF 53
  • Cost of U.S. Drug Abuse — $300 Billion Annually     Health care Lost productivity Crime Law enforcement Source: Senate Confirmation Hearings for National Drug Control Policy Director, Feb 28, 1996 © IEF 54
  • Cost to Industry — More than $100 Billion  Absenteeism  Mistakes  Reduced production Source: Darryl Sinaba, et. al., Uppers Downers and All Arounders, 1994 © IEF 55
  • Worldwide Trade in Illegal Drugs $500 Billion a year industry © IEF 56