The Gold Standard - GIB Summit 2014 by Adrian Rimmer at GIB Summit

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Presented at the 4th Global Infrastructure Basel Summit 21 & 22 May 2014.
Read more about the world leading platform for Sustainable Infrastructure Finance at www.gib-foundation.org.
Next Summit: 27 & 28 May 2015 in Switzerland

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    These are the key areas of need for scaled up investment which is why GS has chosen to work on them.



  • As a leading player in the delivery of finance to low carbon growth, The Gold Standard has built on this analysis looking more concretely at 109 of our c.1000 carbon reduction projects measuring and valuing as many of the co-benefits as possible that the IPCC did not assess.

    Across a project portfolio level it’s the first time this kind of analysis has been done – and these results are a starting point for discussion and to build upon – but taking our study into account reaching for a clean and sustainable energy future becomes even more compelling from a GDP profit and loss perspective.

  • The Gold Standard - GIB Summit 2014 by Adrian Rimmer at GIB Summit

    1. 1. 0 Financing Sustainable Urbanization, Resilience and Adaptation
    2. 2. 1 Session parameters • How can investment decisions for urban infrastructure be improved by city-wide coordination and connection? • How can international climate finance mechanisms be tapped to finance resilience? • How can household, commercial and communal assets be created and leveraged by implementing and improving transit systems and stations in cities?
    3. 3. 2 Agenda • Who are we, what do we do and our focus areas • Experience and evidence • Applications and examples Global climate and development goals will not be achieved without addressing inequality of access and opportunity
    4. 4. 3 The Gold Standard Foundation • Established by WWF to define, demonstrate & drive best practice in in climate & development finance - on behalf of civil society • Now endorsed by more than 80 international NGOs • Creating trust to drive investment • Assurance of asset integrity & sustainable development impact • Differentiating transformational change from incremental change • More than 1000 projects in 50 countries undergoing certification • Gold Standard approach legislated by Switzerland • Used by the UN and NGOs to finance their own activities
    5. 5. 4 The Gold Standard approach • Maximise the impact of every dollar • Review & assurance of design, implementation and management – Detailed, transparent Project Design Documents – Pre-feasibility Assessment – Local Stakeholder Consultations – Do No Harm Assessment – Sustainable Development Matrix – Opportunity for civil society to review and input to projects – Regular, independent audits of project outcomes • Certified impacts – Transferable Gold Standard certificates or result-based payments • Applied to regulatory schemes and philanthropic activities
    6. 6. 5 Best in class partners
    7. 7. 6 Carbon markets as a financial transfer mechanism
    8. 8. 7 What value a the broader focus? SOCIAL ECONOMIC & TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL
    9. 9. 8 Capture, quantify & financially value the benefits of Gold Standard projects beyond carbon The Brief: Towards Paris 2015 – To demonstrate the impact investment of strong, effective climate action The Rationale: 109 Gold Standard certified projects with verified co-benefits, plus ‘deep dive’ case studies The Evidence: The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB), the System of Environmental-Economic Accounting (SEEA) and the Social Return on Investment (SROI) methodology. The Tools:
    10. 10. 9 Identifying the benefits beyond carbon SOCIALECONOMICENVIRONMENTAL SOCIO-ECONOMIC Biodiversity Balance of Payments Employment Livelihood Health Impacts Afforestation / Reforestation Hectares of forest created/preserved Agroforestry employment Wind Savings in fossil fuel imports Construction & Operation Cookstoves Manufacturing and distribution Financial savings from reduced fuel use Reduced respiratory illnesses / death Water Filters Distribution and installation Financial savings from reduced fuel use Reduced water borne diseases Biogas Distribution and installation Financial savings from reduced fuel use Reduced respiratory illnesses / death
    11. 11. 10 Economic value over crediting period (USD) SOCIALECONOMICENVIRONMENTAL SOCIO-ECONOMIC Biodiversity Balance of Payments Employment Livelihood Health Impacts Afforestation / Reforestation $37m $249m Wind $693 $81m Cookstoves Not quantified $33m $1 billion $628m Water Filters Not quantified $21m Not quantified $3 billion Biogas $9m $43m $180m
    12. 12. 11 Economic value per tonne of CO2 (USD) SOCIALECONOMICENVIRONMENTAL SOCIO-ECONOMIC Biodiversity Balance of Payments Employment Livelihood Health Impacts Afforestation / Reforestation $150 $27 Wind $19 $2 Cookstoves Not quantified $3 $93 $55 Water Filters Not quantified $1 Not quantified $117 Biogas $2 $7 $32
    13. 13. 12 • Indigenous people living in Sichuan Panda habitat • Firewood is the main source of energy -26 tons per household per yea • Three stone stoves for food, feed, heating • Degrading landscape, 3 months of time, Massive indoor air pollution Meet the Yi
    14. 14. 13 13 From: To: Source: WWF China • Energy Efficient stoves with chimney: • 50-70% less firewood needed and extracts smoke • 1,600 stoves installed, estimated demand min 20,000
    15. 15. 14 Conservation with all its facets: • Climate change mitigation • Biodiversity protection • Improved livelihoods • Indigenous rights • Women empowerment • Awareness, education So far, WWF projects in China, Nepal, Kenya, Madagascar are good examples of these. Result Outcomes/y Value in $/y Climate: 16,000 tons CO2 emission reduction 160,000 Biodiversity: 17,500 tons of wood = 224 ha 349,000 Health: 2.75 prevented deaths 325,000 Livelihoods: 433 hours saved = $374 per family 600,000 TOTAL: 1,434,000 Total value 9 times the carbon value
    16. 16. 15 Where do we go from here? • Continue to drive best practice into carbon markets • Apply our experience to new tools e.g. NAMAs • Apply this approach at scale – Cities - a problem and opportunity for low carbon inclusive growth – Land-use & landscapes – currently responsible for 20% of all emissions – Water & Health (adaptation) – helping to safeguard livelihoods of the poor – Linking public & private sector investments (sustainable infrastructure, supply chains)
    17. 17. 16 Gold Standard Cities • ‘Investment ready’ governance and financing framework • Defined activity areas and funding sources – Domestic funding – ODA and Climate Finance – Private sector investment • Defined goals – Mitigation – Resilience – Employment & livelihoods – Pro-poor / gender empowerment focus • Clear benchmarks and baselines • Consistent reporting and impact measurement tools
    18. 18. 17 Pilot Cities • New Delhi, India (Bottom up approach) – 8m slum dwellers, massive equity issues – Complex interventions needed for scale – What measures will drive the largest transformation and wider impact? • Columbo, Sri Lanka (Top down approach) – Strategic partnership with World Bank & Sril Lankan government – Design Columbo Green Growth Programme & MRV framework – Sector focus (Buildings, Transport, Agriculture & land management) • Sakarya, Turkey (both) – UNDP supported programme – Baselines and prioritisation of programmes – Business case development •
    19. 19. 18 Thank you adrian.rimmer@goldstandard.org www.goldstandard.org (impact report)

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